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VOLUME 33 
Thirty-five volumes were bound and distributed as follows: 
Headquarters - San Francisco: Journal Office, Reading Foom, 
Editor, Manager, S. F. Public Library, Labor Clarion, 
(one each) Total: 

Sailors' Union Branches: Tacoma, Seattle, Port Townsend, 
Aberdeen, Portland, Eureka, San Pedro, Honolulu 
and Vancouver, 
Pacific Coast Marine Firemen's Union, San Francisco 
Fishermen of the Pacific, San Francisco, 1; Seattle, 1; 
B. & R. Stearr.boatmen, San Frarcisco, 1; Sacr=imento, 1; 
Lake Seamen's Union, Chicago, Buffalo, Ashtabula, Toledo, 

Cleveland, North Tonawanda, Detroit, Milwaukee, 
Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, Boston, 
A. C. Marine Firemen's Union, Brooklyn, 
M. C. & St. of the Atlantic, New York, 

M, C. & St. Union of the Great Lakes, Buffalo, N, Y. 

Total! 



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3 
3 
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INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-THREE 

SEPTEMBER 22, 1909— SEPTEMBER 14, 1910. 



Title Xo. Page 

A 

Aliolish Sea-Slavery, To •. 13 6 

Abolishing Poverty 25 11 

Abolishing Slums 29 11 

Absurd Court Decisions 35 2 

Abuse of Police Power Zl 6 

Abusing P'ranking Privilege 38 11 

Accident Compensation, Spain's .38 10 

Accident Insurance, German 51 2 

Accidents. British Industrial 14 11 

Accidents. Railway 23 3 

Accidents to Railroafl Men 34 10 

"After the Strike" 11 6 

Age of the World 51 3 

Alaska, Mining in 19 11 

Alaska, Strange Custom of 2Z 3 

Alaska, Stay Away from 35 6 

Alaska and Pacific Coal ; 50 2 

Ambergris, Uses of 43 11 

America, Rome and 49 3 

A. F. of L. — Convention Proceedings, Etc. — 

Contempt Sentence Upheld 9 1 

Convention Call 1 7 

Convention, Report of 10-1 ; 11-1 

CTompers' .Sentence .Affirmed 7 6 

Powers of the Federation 7 7 

Seamen, Federation Supports 10 6 

Seamen's .\ppeal. The 12 6 

Seamen .Address Federation 12 7 

American Labor Productivity 32 10 

American Vessels, Oldest 40 2 

Americans Emigrate. Why 24 8 

.Americans, Canada Likes 37 11 

America's Inventiveness 26 10 

An Old Friend ("Starkey") 23 6 

Antiquity of Windmill 50 11 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Arbitration. Compulsory 21 6 

Arbitration Board Formed 47 6 

History of a Failure 35 1 

Lemieux Act, The 31 9 

Army, Sentencing Men to the 43 3 

Athletes Good Gunners 41 11 

Atlantic, Christmas on the 16 3 

Atlantic .Seamen's Items 21 3 

.\tlantic Notes 36 3 

Atlantic, Progress on the 34 6 

Australia, Coercion in 24 1 

.Australia, Population of 50 11 

■Australian Labor Victory 41 1 

Austria, Living in 23 10 

.Austria Increasing Navy 33 10 

Austria's Great Navy 22 11 

.Awakening of .Arabia 43 3 

B 

Back to the States 48 11 

Bank Clerks' Reunions 30 2 

Battleships, Oil for 35 3 

Bavarian Workmen. Homes for 49 2 

Bay State's Life Insurance 17 2, 

Beer, Non-.AIcoholic 50 3 

Benefit Funds. Insurance and 21 1 

Beri-Beri 50 3 

Berlin, Growth of 48 10 

Birthday of Samuel Gompers 20 7 

"BlacWball Jack" (By "El Tuerto") 28 2 

Bloodhounds, Get the 46 6 

Boycott, the Secondary 12 10 

Boycott, Mitchell on the 12 1 

Brazil, Immigrants in .30-10; 42-10 

Brazil, Wireless in 4? H 

Brief to President Taft 36 10 



Title Xo. Page 

Britain's Old .Age Pensions 23 2 

British Trade-Union Congress 4 1 

British Labor Treaty 8 11 

British Railway Wages 29 11 

British Labor and Wages 30 11 

British Navy Fuel 43 11 

British Seamen's Meeting 48 7 

British Labor Laws 49 2 

British Emigration 49 2 

British Co-operative .Movement 50 3 

Brown the "Horse" ('By "El Tuerto")... 9 2 

Brnt.ility on the Babcock 36 6 

Bureaucracy, Power of 52 10 

c 

Canada. Population of 21 2 

Canada, Fatalities in 25 11 

Canada Likes .Americans 37 11 

Canada, Plural Voting in 40 3 

Canada, Immigration to 45 3 

Canada, .Merchant Marine of 49 7 

Canada, Growth of 49 10 

Canal Costs More, Why the .' 23 11 

Canal, Lock, Premium for 34 3 

Canals, Traffic Through 37 9 

Canadian Waterways 33 3 

Canadian Drydock, New 42 10 

Census. German Industrial 23 11 

Chile. Republic of 48 3 

China, Ancient Walls of 19 10 

China, Living in 29 10 

China, Nationality in 33 10 

Christmas on the .Atlantic... 16 3 

Cities, Pacific Coast, Future of 32 3 

Cities, German, Lead 39 3 

Cities, Smaller, Show Growth 52 11 

Citizenship. .Applications for 23 2 

City. Make-Up of a 18 10 

City, Largest Latin-.American 31 11 

Civil List, Uncle Sam's 35 2 

Clock, Putting Back the 35 10 

Coal Shipping Belt 30 10 

Coal War. The 38 10 

Coal Enough to Last 38 10 

Coal, .Alaska and Pacific 50 2 

Coal, .An Ocean Liner's 51 11 

Coasters, Some Smart 22 3 

Cocoanut Growing, Mexican 45 10 

Coercion in Australia 24 1 

Colony of Mauritius 29 2 

Color of the Sea 20 10 

Coast Seamen's Journal — 

Volume Twenty-three / 1 6 

Coast Seamen's Journal, Press Com- 
ment on 27 7 

Coast Seamen's Journal 28 7 

Comedy of Terrors, .A (By "El Tuerto") 13 2 

Comet, Halley's 34 2 

Common Law, Unions in 37 5 

Commons, House of 32 3 

Compass, Discovery of 3 3 

Compass, Mariner's, New 18 10 

Comi)ensation to Seamen 45 11 

Compulsory Arbitration 21 6 

Compulsory Insurance 30 11 

Compulsory Wireless 44 7 

Concerning Population 48 11 

Conciliation in Denmark 47 11 

Conciliation for Seamen 49 1 

Congressmen, Records of 47 1 

Consumption, Mortality from 18 11 

Constantinople, Dogs of 50 11 

Contempt, Gompers on 8 6 

Cooks, .Marine, in .Australia 5 11 

Co-Operative Societies. English 22 . 10 



Title Xo. 

Co-Operative Societies, .Scotch 42 

Co-Operative Movement, British 50 

Cost of Living in United States 20 

Cost of City Government 50 

Courts, .And Respect for Them 49 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

.Accidents to Seamen 35 

Court Decisions, Absurd 35 

Duties to Sick Seamen 38 

Injured Firemen Aided 42 

.Mutiny on W. F. Babcock 36 

Seamen, .Accident to 2 

Seaman, Who is a 2 

Seaman Returning to Ship 52 

Seamen's Pay Withheld 6 

Trade Disputes Act 4 

When Does "Incapacity" Cease 11 

Who is a Seaman? 29 

Who is "Within the Act"? 43 

Crime and Punishment 40 

Cuba. Race Question in 19 

Cuba, Labor in 38 

Cunard Line, Subsidies Paid 51 

Cz.irina, Wreck of the IS 

D 

Damming the Mississippi 43 

Danger Signal Device 45 

Davits and Life-Preservers 22 

Deaths from Tuberculosis 19 

Deaths froin Drowning 43 

Denmark, Unemployment in 35 

DeTimark. Emigration from 38 

Denmark, Conciliation in 47 

Denmark, Insurance in 49 

Development of Thermometer 52 

"Desertion" in Norway 33 

Distribution of Wealth 50 

Disappearing Figurehead, The 51 

Discipline, Xaval 28 

Discoverer, Wreck 32 

Discoveries, Simultaneous 25 

Divers, Magnets Replacing 45 

Dogs of Constantinople 50 

Drink Bills, United States 36 

Drydock, New Canadian 42 

Dwarfs in Papua 48 

Dwellings for Workingmen 52 

E 

I'';irth. Population of the 26 

I'.arthquake Results, Catching 49 

b'.ducation in Russia 22 

I'-gyptian .Self-Governmcnt 51 

ICight Hours in Iron Trades 38 

lught-Hour Struggle. The 40 

b'lection, San I'Vancisco 8 

I'llections in Switzerland 47 

lunigration from Denmark 38 

I'.migration, British 49 

ICmperor of the Oceans (By .A. Wange- 

mann) 51 

ICmployes, luigland's Municipal 32 

ICmployment Insurance 45 

I'.ngland's Municipal Employes 32 

b'.ngland's New Naval Base 39 

iMiglish Co-Operative Societies 22 

luiglish Channel Ferry 39 

ICnglish Labor Exchanges 42 

English, .Spread of 46 

F.rt. kson's Discovery 19 

luir()])c, blight to 43 

I'lirope, .Short Route to 44 

luirope. River Tr-;ide in 45 

F.xpeditions, North Polar 16 



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COAST SEA.M1£.\S lOlRXAL IXDEX— NOLL'-M K '^\\■|•:.\T^•-TI 1 REE. 



Title No. Page 

Union> and Politics 34 10 

Unions in Common Law 37 3 

Union-Label. Law of the 46 1 

Union 1 ,al)cl Department 47 3 

Uncle Sam's Pay Roll 24 11 

LIncle Sam's Civil List 35 2 

United States. Wealth of 23 10 

United States Drink Hill 36 10 

United States. Suicide in 51 2 

United Kingdom, Labor in 41 2 

Uses of Seaweed 18-11:30-10 

Uses of Rubber 39 11 

Uses of .Ambergris 43 11 

Unskilled Labor ( Hy "LI Tuerto") 12 2 

Varying Color of the Sea 52 11 

Vatican. "M Home" .\t the 19 11 

Victory for Public Ownership 42 1 

Victory for llunian Rights (Laundrj' 

Workers ) 42 6 

Violence. L.-ihor Repudi;ites S 7 

W-X-Y-Z 

Wages, 1 ,abor and 26 11 

Wages. British Railway 29 11 

Wages, British, and Labor 30 11 

Wages and Life, Swiss 44 11 

W\ills, .Ancient, of China 19 10 

Warning, A ( Eureka ) 47 2 

Water Bonds ( S. F.). Labor and the.. 17 6 

Water Won and Lost 18 6 

Waterways, Canadian 33 3 

Waves. Height of 6-3; 37-7 

Wealth of United States 23 10 

Wealth, Distribution of 50 10 

Wheat Crop. World's 32 11 

Whales of To-Day 15 3 

Wilson on Injunctions 20 1 

Wind Locomotion 27 10 

Windmill. .\ntif|uity of 50 11 

Wireless Record 5 5 

Wireless on the Pacific 17 10 

Wireless, hirst on Sailing Vessel 35 5 



Title No. Page 

Wireless in Brazil 42 11 

Wireless, Compulsory 44 7 

Wireless, Steamships .Adopting 51 2 

Wireless on German Ships 52 10 

Word from 'Way Off 34 6 

Workers of the World 5 1 

Workers' Victory. The ( By Jakob Jo- 

hansen ) 32 8 

Workers of Switzerland 38 10 

Workingmen. Dwellings for 52 11 

World, Ocean Tonnage of the 17 10 

World's Wheat Crop 32 11 

World. Great Ports of the 37 3 

Wi>rld. .\ge of the 51 3 

Women. Occupations of 30 3 

Women in Universities 43 3 

Women as Lawmakers 49 11 

Women Workers in Germany 50-2; 50-7 

Wonders. Seven Modern 48 10 

Wreck of the Czarina 18 6 

Wreck Discovery Device 19 11 

Wreck Discoverer M 5 

Wrecks — 

.\gate 46 5 

.Mbion 48 5 

.Alexander Black 18-5; 20-5 

.\ndel.uia 34 5 

Annie L. Smale 44 5 

.Argo 12-5; 14-5; .^3-5 

Blakelcv 18 5 

Brodick Castle 14 5 

City of Peking 45-5; 49-5 

Clan Macpherson 16 5 

Columbia 16 5 

Czarina 18-5; 21-5 

Dora Bluhm 37-5; 39-5 

Eva 33-5; 34-5 

l-.va Marie 41 7 

l-arallon 21-5; 22-5; 23-5; 28-5; 29-5; 35-5 

h". S. Ciampa 24 5 

Gracie L 3i< 5 

Grayling 45 5 



Title Xo. Page 

llelga 48-5:50-5 

Horner 15 5 

.Indiana 18-5; 19-5; 29-5: 32-5: 49-5 

Isaac T. Campbell 3 14 

Tnverncss-shire 42 5 

Ivy 3 5 

James Rolph 47-5: 48-5 

J. Marhoflfer 36 5 

Joe Matthews 41 5 

John Proctor 1 14 

John S. Bennett 10 13 

Kentuckv 21 5 

Kilburn " 38-5; 50-5 

Laurentian 10 13 

1 ,ena S weasev 27 5 

Lima ' 23 5 

Loch Katrine 38 5 

Lonsdale 38 5 

Majestic 13 5 

Mary E. Russ 27 5 

.Matterhorn 12-5: 14-5: 15-5:16-5 

Mathew Turner 29-5: 30-5; 31-5 

Ohio 1-1:3-5:3-7: 18-5 

Phoenix 49-5: 50-5: 51-5 

R D. Tnman 27 5 

San Buenaventura 19 5 

Santa Clara 31-5: 33-5 

Silberhorn 20 5 

Snowdrop 3 14 

Solano 27 5 

So(|uel 13 5 

Sorenson 36 5 

Stanley 34 5 

St. Croi.x 11-5: 12-5 

Susie M. Plummer.. 15-11: 17-5; 19-5; 21-5 22-.2 

Tropic Bird 27 5 

Umhiali 2 12 

Utgard 22-5: 24-5: 35-.5 

Valencia 16 5 

Venice 31 5 

Yosemite 18 5 

Yucatan.. 23-5: 28-5: 31-5; .3.3-5: 38-5: 42-'^: 44-5 

Yuo.-it-'ii, Ruined Cities of 52 10 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Sezinien's Union of Americtu 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Qui Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: justice by Oiganization. 



VOL. XXIII, No. 



SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 22, 1909. 



Whole No. 2035. 



TO THE V\^ORLD'S SEAMEN. 



IN CONFORMITY with the request made by 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, that the 
International Seamen's Union of America 
open correspondence with the seamen's unions of 
other countries, regarding the proposed confer- 
ence of the world's seamen, President Andrew 
Furuseth and Secretary-Treasurer William H. 
I'razier have issued the following address: 

Office of Secretary-Treasurer 
International Seamen's Union of America, 
154 Lewis Street, Boston, Mass., 
August 30, 1909. 
TO THE WORLD'S SEAMEN: 

Comrades — In reading over the different mari- 
time codes it must become plain to the reader 
that there is no practical difference between them 
in reference to the status of the seaman. In all 
codes he is made the property of the vessel on 
which he sails; once having signed he must serve 
with or against his will at sea, in an open road- 
stead, or in a safe harbor. To leave the vessel 
singly or in combination brings prison penalty. 
To refuse to work, even while lying in a safe har- 
bor where there is no danger to life or property, 
brings prison penalty along with loss of wages 
earned. Wages to be earned may be and are taken 
to pay for services of shipowners' agents, who 
serve as middlemen in hunting up men for the 
vessel. In practically all codes there is permis- 
sion to hire and take to sea as members of the 
crew, any men regardless of their skill or lack of 
skill, regardless of their knowledge or lack of 
knowledge in the language used on the vessel on 
which they are serving. This means that the 
must inefficient men set the wages for the effi- 
cient ones, and that the efificient men at sea do 
the work of the inefficient ones. 

Since all seamen suffer from the same laws, 
and want of proper laws, we believe that there 
should be a meeting of representatives of the sea- 
men of all nations, with the object of coming to 
an understanding and an agreement upon a legis- 
lative programme to be submitted to all govern- 
ments and to all national legislative bodies. 

We believe that by such unanimous demand we 
shall be able to repeal the antiquated, unjust and 
injurious laws and obtain for ourselves the right 
of combination and self help, where such combina- 
tion can be exercised without endangering either 
life or property as such, namely, while lying in 
a safe harbor. We believe, further, that in the in- 
terest of safety of life at sea, we shall be able to 
obtain laws providing for a specific numiier of 
skilled men to be on board of the vessel before 
she is permitted to proceed to sea. 

You will see that such legislation would place 
the seamen on the same level with other workers. 
We could then have organization with means of 
enforcing proper improvements in the seamen's 
conditions. As it now stands we can only beg, 
and yoii know how the beggars are treated; or we 
can at most refuse to sign on in vessels until 
proper conditions are granted. This is a strike of 
the unemployed — that is to say, not a strike at all. 
A strike is quitting work in combination in order 
to make the machinery, the factory, land or rneans 
of transportation useless to its owner until he 
shall grant proper conditions. Leaving the em- 
ployer without workmen is like leaving the gov- 



ernment without authority to collect and expend 
money. Democracy insists upon holding in its 
hands the power to levy or not to levy taxes, to 
grant or to withhold supplies in order that polit- 
ical grievances may be redressed. A strike is 
withholding labor power necessary to production 
or transportation in order that the industrial con- 
ditions may be ameliorated. A people without 
power over taxation is impotent for good. Its 
only means of redress is revolution, arms in hand. 
A working class without power to withdraw its 
labor power from employers, as a last means of 
bringing about decent conditions, has no remedy 
except insurrection by means of physical force. 
This last is, of course, sheer nonsense and no 
remedy at all. The workers on shore have en- 
joyed the right to quit work for nearly a hun- 
dred years. They have used it with differing sin- 
cerity and skill in different countries. Where 
they have used it most skillfully and with the 
greatest sincerity, there they have obtained the 
best conditions. They have improved their wages, 
shortened their working hours and improved the 
shop conditions in proportion to their own unity, 
sincerity and endurance. 

We seamen must acquire this power in order to 
be able to help ourselves. If it be true that "who 
would be free, themselves must strike the blow," it 
must follow that they must first obtain a weapon 
with which to strike that blow. To the man bound 
to service or labor on pain of imprisonment, there 
is no such weapon; he must first make it, and in 
so doing, he must first realize the real meaning 
of his own condition; second, he must have cour- 
age to complain and fortitude to suffer until re- 
dress can come. 

Let us come together to try if we can agree 
upon the real trouble under which we suffer, if 
we can complain in such a manner that it must 
be understood by men on shore, and if we can 
help and encourage each other to endure, until we 
shall be endowed with the freedom, and hence 
the power, to help ourselves. 

It is the hope of the organized seamen of 
America that you will place this matter before 
your organization at the'earliest possible moment 
and open correspondence with me on the subject 
matter, and if it is possible for your organization 
to be represented at such a meeting. 

We would suggest that such a meeting be held 
in Copenhagen, Denmark, a few days prior to the 
convention of the International Transport-Work- 
ers' Federation, in August, 1910, the date to be 
fixed later. 

Hoping that I will hear from you at an early 
date, and that you will be able to assure me that 
your organization will be willing to meet at the 
time and place above mentioned, we are, 

For the Frecdoin and Unity of the World's 
. Seamen, 

ANDREW FURUSETH, 
President, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 
WM, H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 

The terms of the address set forth clearly and 
concisely the purpose of the conference. Already 
the suggestion of a conference has been favorably 
received by the seamen's unions in several Euro- 
pean countries. Acting upon the publication iri 



these columns of the resolution adopted by the 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific, the Norwegian Sea- 
men's Union has expressed its approval of the 
project. More recently the Seamen's Union- of 
Holland, through its official organ, De Neder- 
landsche Zeeman, has placed itself on record as 
favoring the conference. Our contemporary, in 
its issue of September 4, reprints the resolution 
adopted by the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, and 
also the editorial comment of the Journal on the 
same subject. In an article headed, "Away With 
the Seamen's Bondage," the Zeeman expresses its 
approval of the plan to hold an international con- 
ference, and states its belief that the representa- 
tives of the Dutch seamen will support the pro- 
posals of their American comrades to the full ex- 
tent of their power. 

The favorable attitude of our comrades in Eu- 
rope affords a substantial guarantee of the success 
of the conference. There is no good reason to 
doubt that the conference will be held, that it 
will be largely representative, and that it will 
mark an epoch in the history of the seafaring 
craft. That the conference will arrest the atten- 
tion of the whole civilized world, and that it will 
do much to enlighten the world on the subject of 
maritime affairs, thus arousing a personal as well 
as a humanitarian interest among all classes, not 
least among the governing classes — these arc 
foregone conclusions. 

Of course, the success of the conference will 
depend largely upon the degree of unanimity 
among the seamen themselves upon the main 
purposes of the gathering. These are, first, to 
declare for the personal liberty of the seaman 
(i. e., the right to quit the vessel in any safe port 
by the abolition of the penalty of "imprisonment 
for desertion"); secondly, to declare for legisla- 
tion by all maritime nations for the efficient man- 
ning of vessels. Concerning these subjects, es- 
pecially as to the first-mentioned, opinions may 
differ on the score of practicability. But there 
can be no difference of opinion as to the RIGHT 
itself. That the seaman should be FREE IN 
THE DISPOSITION OF HIS OWN BODY— 
as free as any other man — is as clearly a right as 
is the fact of the seaman's manhood. The present 
laws of "imprisonment for desertion" are founded 
upon the theory of a difference in respect to com- 
mon manhnud between the seaman and other 
classes of men. Once the fact in this respect is 
recognized by the seamen themselves and by them 
firmly declared to the world, the emancipation of 
the seafaring class from the thralldom of slavery 
will follow in the nature of things. 

"WHO WOULD BE FREE. THEMSELVES 
MUST STRIKE THE BLOW!" 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURXAI.. 



STEAMSHIPS TO TAHITI. 



Tlic Union Slcanisliii) Company, of New 
Zealand, made arrangements in 1908 to start 
in Jannary a new line between Wellington, 
having connections there for Australian 
ports, and Tahiti, where close connection 
would be made every 36 days with the 
Oceanic line for San Francisco. This Syd- 
ney-Wellington line has now made its fifth 
trip to Tahiti, where it has made connec- 
tion each time with the Mariposa for San 
Francisco. A considerable numl>er of pas- 
sengers have taken advantage of this con- 
nection in going from the United States to 
New Zealand and Australia, but the num- 
ber of through passengers in the other di- 
rection has been small, owing perhaps to 
the fact that the new line has not been so 
well advertised there as in America, and 
to the further consideration that New Zea- 
land and Australian travelers may take 
passage on ships of a through line to Van- 
couver, where connection is made with the 
Canadian Pacific Railway. The new line 
oflFers an excellent opportunity to travelers 
who may wish to go by one line and return 
by another in making tours in the South 
Pacific. 

Up to the present time very little through 
freight has been carried in either direction 
by this new line. As to business between 
New Zealand and Tahiti, it is likely to be 
done as in past years by means of the ship 
of the Union line, which continues to make 
the usual round trip between .Auckland and 
Tahiti every 28 days. A considerable quan- 
tity of through freight for San Francisco 
was of^^ered to the Union line on each trip, 
but it would have been running too great a 
risk to accept it, as the Oceanic line is un- 
der contract to give the preference to freight 
offered in the colony of Tahiti, from whicli 
it receives a subsidy for carrying the mails, 
as it docs al.so from the United States. It 
is expected that the through-freight busi- 
ness will improve for the rest of the year, 
and when the wireless telegraph system is 
installed .some diflficulties, now of a serious 
nature, may be removed. 

Some time ago the Chamber of Commerce 
of Noumea, the capital of the colony of New 
Caledonia, propo.sed that the French line of 
steamships running between Marseilles by 
way of Sydney to Noumea should be ex- 
tended to Tahiti ; and that, at the expiration 
of the contract with the Oceanic Steamsjiip 
Company, the subsidy of 150,000 francs 
($28,950), now paid for ten round trips a 
year between San Francisco and Tahiti, 
should not again be voted to that company, 
but that aid should be given to a French 
line so that iti might be extended to San 
Francisco, thus making a through line from 
that city, by way of Tahiti, Fiji, New Cale- 
donia, and .Vustralia, to Marseilles. The 
Chamber of Commerce of Papeete has ex- 
pressed itself as being favorable to the pro- 
posal from Noumea, provided that the time 
of trips between Papeete and San Francisco 
be not lengthened and that the freight rates 
be restored to wdiat they were before they 
were advanced in March. 1907. 

In the published proceedings of the 
Chamber of Commerce of Papeete it is stat- 
ed that the proposed extension of the French 
line from New Caledonia to Tahiti and 
thence to San Francisco has also received 
favorable consideration in Paris. This is not 
surprising in view of the increased interest 



which France has been manifesting in her 
cfilonics, especially those in the South Pa- 
cific, 'i'lie superior council of the colonies 
has recently instituted a comparative study 
of colonial administration, and the com- 
mission of reorganization has published a 
comprehensive report of the results of that 
investigation, which will no doubt lead to 
improvements in the government of the nu- 
merous French colonies. 

It appears from colonial publications that 
a serious effort is being made to improve 
the condition of New Caledonia, known 
cIiicMy as a ])eiia] colony (thougii prisoners 
are no longer sent there), but worthy of 
consideration on account of its mineral 
wealth and agricultural possibilities. In- 
cluding tlic Lf)yalty Islands the area is 7,654 
square miles. The proposal from Noumea 
to extend the French steamship line to Ta- 
hiti and San Francisco may be regarded as 
an indication of the interest felt in improv- 
ing the coiulit'on of that colonv. 



POPULAR EDUCATION. • 



A novel plan is now being put into exe- 
cution in Saxony to enable the peasantry 
living at a distance from the educational 
advantages of the cities to become acquaint- 
ed with certain phases of modern art and 
literature. Due to the initiative of a citizen 
of Plauen, a free traveling exposition of 
moderate size has l^een organized, and sev- 
eral villages have been selected in which 
the exposition will be held, with the help, 
in particular, of the local clergy and public- 
school teachers. 

P.ooks of interesting and elevating char- 
acter, principally by German authors, cheap- 
ly and artistically printed, are displayed. 
There are also copies of verj^ cheap editions 
that visitors may buy if they feel so in- 
clined. Much attention is paid to books for 
children, and entertaining stories, popular 
biographies, and histories are offered at 
prices within reach of all, in the hope that 
they will take the place of detective stories 
and the like, which are found everywhere. 

The living room of the peasant's home is 
rarely decorated with an artistic picture, and 
as such can now be bought in this country 
for a very low price in the form of colored 
prints of real merit, a section of the expo- 
sition is devoted to the display of attractive 
pictures of this class. 

Included in the exposition is a collection 
of laces and embroideries. As is well known, 
this part of Saxony is largely engaged in 
the |iroduction of such articles. Many wom- 
en and girls learn the different parts of the 
hand work on machine-made lace, and others 
devote themselves altogether to hand-made 
pillovv-Iaces. With this in view, the art 
school of this city has loaned to the ex- 
position a representative line of artistic 
laces, showing various stitches that can be 
learned without great difficulty, even by in- 
experienced hands. Those who may wish 
to copy the stitches or designs can get the 
use of the different pieces. -\lso, several 
very old specimens of Saxon lace have been 
given provisionally by the local art school. 

-Although this peculiar exposition of art 
and literature is just starting on its travels 
in the remote rural districts, sufficient inter- 
est has already been shown by the people 
for whom it is primarily designed to encour- 
age the sup]-)orters of the philanthropic en- 
terprise to further efforts. 



FRENCH NEEDLE WORKERS. 



The recent in(|uiry In the French I'.ureau 
of Labor is set forth in a report dealing 
with some of the "home" industries, espe- 
cially those in the branch of needlework. 
In the Loire region, at Bourges, Mans, and 
Cholet, women labor ten hours or more per 
day sewing on shirts, skirts, and other ar- 
ticles of clothing. For this work they de- 
rive an annual income of from 108 to 240 
francs ($20.84 to $46.32). In numerous dis- 
tricts a wage of from 3 to 5 centimes (5 
centimes:^-! cent) per hour is paid. Com- 
petition both in respect to labor and mar- 
kets is said to have produced this condi- 
tion. The beautiful work of other days, 
kiiovvn as classicpie, is no longer in demand. 
The poor stuff flooding the markets, prin- 
ci])ally in the country districts, has given 
rise to the keenest competition among le- 
gions of working women who engage in 
every kind of ordinary hand work. In Bre- 
tagne, at Concarneau, the sardine packers, 
when the season is slack, are employed in 
the production of "Irish lace" at ridiculous- 
ly low wages. They produce their goods 
from patterns furnished to them by the large 
buyers. At Auvergne the field laborers make 
pillow lace, which nets them at the rate of 
25 centimes (5 cents) {)er meter (39.37 
inches). The.se same goods are said to be 
sold elsewhere for l..=iO francs (39 cents) 
per meter. The attempt made by certain 
fashionable ladies to place the laces "en 
vogue" has, according to report, met with 
little success. 

At a recent conference at the Academy of 
AToral and Political Sciences the question of 
a change of system with regard to such la- 
bor and its compensation was discussed by 
men prominent in the lace industry and 
trade. These men disc<3urage any attem])t 
to provide relief through legislative means, 
but suggest that an arrangement be effected 
with the workers which will insure them a 
more equitable basis in the production of 
their hand work. This includes the consid- 
eration of a minimum annual wage for a 
day of 10 hours, as well as the condition 
that, in the distribution of work, the price 
of "making up" should accord with the min- 
imum rate. There seems to be a disinclina- 
tion to follow in the steps of recent British 
legislation in these special classes of indus- 
try. The feeling appears to sanction the 
scheme of a voluntary understanding or con- 
tractual relation between the cottage work- 
ers and the agents. 



.\t the re(|uest of the local authorities, 
the Russian Minister of the Interior has 
granted jiermission for the importation of 
-Australian beef into \'ladivostok during 
1909, provided each shi])ment is supplied 
with a veterinary certificate vistfed by a Rus- 
sian consul. 



Never in the history of the Canary Is- 
lands has there l)ecn so large a crop of 
grapes as in 1908. and more wine has been 
made than can be disposed of. The retail 
price for a liter of fair native wine is 30 
centimos (6 cents). 



The importation of Ceylon elephants to 
work in the Philippine lumber camps is pro- 
posed to make up for the scarcity of draft 
animals in the islands. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SUBMARINE NAVIGATION. 



One of the most prolific sources of danger 
on board submarines is tlie chlorine gas 
which is immediately generated if sea water 
gets into the storage batteries. A very small 
quantity of chlorine gas in the air will ren- 
der work impossible, by causing violent 
coughing and a very little more will cause 
suffocation. 

In October, 1905, three submarines of the 
"A class were carrying on instructional exer- 
cises in Stokes Bay. 

While A 4 was below surface some water 
got into the accumulators. Before the sur- 
face could be reached again an explosion 
occurred, and some of the gear was thrown 
out of trim, with the result that the vessel 
rose at an angle. 

When the craft was seen to rise out of the 
water, stern first, with her conning-tower 
still under, the tug Nettle rushed to her as- 
sistance, and, attaching a hawser, pulled her 
level. 

Then the conning-tower was opened, and, 
amidst the yellowish fumes of the chlorine 
gas, the crew crawled out in a half-suffo- 
cated condition. 

Twice the coolness and heroism of her 
officers have saved the A 9 from terrible 
disaster. 

In February, 1906, the frail craft was 
struck 1)y a trading vessel when twenty-five 
feet under water. Lieutenant Eraser or- 
dered the blowing of the ballast tank, and 
the jjumping out of the water that had got 
into her conning-tower. Aluch to the relief 
of all the boat rose to the surface. 

In July of last year, as ])art of a flotilla of 
seven submarines, the A 9 left Portsmouth, 
accompanied by the parent ship Aeolus. 
Lieutenant Groves was in the conning- 
tower, with Lieutenant Warren, when he 
noticed a strong smell of petrol gas, followed 
by the movements of the vessel becoming 
erratic. lie signaled to the crew of eight 
below, but received no answer. The two 
officers then ventured below, and found the 
engines going full speed, but the crew all 
lying apparently lifeless. 

Lieutenants Groves and W'arren tried 
again and again to reach the engines, but 
were driven back by the fumes. A petty 
officer, who had been above with them, de- 
scended, but was stricken down. Then the 
gallant officers enveloped their faces in wet 
clcjths, and Lieutenant Groves succeeded in 
turning off the supply of petrol, thus stop- 
])ing the engines and the generation of gas. 
lie was found by the rescue-party, that ar- 
rived soon after, lying stretched across the 
engines ; but he had saved his men and his 
shi]). 

'JMiere were no white mice on board the 
A 9 when this accident happened, although 
lormerly every submarine carried three oi 
these little creatures. They were allowed 1 
shilling a week each for rations, and the 
sum was entered in the Navy pay-roll. Their 
duty was to run about their cages, squeaking 
shrilly whenever they detected the ])resence 
of noxious gases ; and many a disaster they 
have averted. 

Recently, they were replaced by an auto- 



matic contrivance which serves the same 
purpose. — London Answers. 



NEW YORK'S BARGE CANAL. 



The stupendous engineering work which 
the United States Government is carrying 
on at the Isthmus of Panama so completely 
fills the public eye that very little is heard 
of that other great work of canal construc- 
tion which is being executed in our very 
midst in the enlargement and reconstruction 
of the old Erie Canal between Buffalo and 
Albany. Certainly but few people outside 
of professional circles are aware that in 
point of magnitude of excavation the figures 
for the New York State barge canal rival, if 
they do not exceed, those of the Panama 
canal. Admitting that there can be no com- 
parison on the score of accommodations be- 
tween a canal twelve feet in depth and one 
with a maximum depth of forty-five feet, it 
should not be forgotten that whereas the 
Panama canal from shore line to shore line 
is but forty miles in length, the New York 
barge canal is nearly 400 miles. Further- 
more, the latter work involves the construc- 
tion of thirty-four dams, fifty-three locks and 
seven guard locks, the construction of which 
is complicated by the fact that the canal, be- 
ing built through the most thickly popu- 
lated section of New York State, the effect 
of these works on adjoining- properties and 
water powers has to be considered and due 
precautions against damage taken, involving 
additional costs in time and labor. 

It is in the comparison of the amount of 
excavation done, however, that the sur])ris- 
ing fact is develo])e(! that the total amount 
of excavation and its equivalent in concrete 
structures, if compared for the same period 
of time, is found to be actually greater on 
the State canal than on the national under- 
taking at Panama. Up to January 1, 1909, 
the excavation on the barge canal amounted 
to 15,168,000 cubic yards, and if to this be 
added the concrete and other construction 
work, the total cost up to that date reaches 
$8,701,000. On the Panama canal, up to 
January 1, 1908, the total amount of material 
taken out amounted to 22,255,000 cubic 
yards, and up to that time practically no 
work had been done on the concrete struc- 
tures. It is stated by the engineers that if 
the sum of money expended during the 
])eriod under consideration on concrete and 
other structures on the barge canal had been 
paid for excavation at the prevailing rate, it 
would have been possible to remove an ad- 
ditional 10,417,000 cubic yards of material. 
This would have brought the total of exca- 
^'ation up to 25,585,000 cubic yards, which 
would have been equivalent to an increase 
of 12 per cent over the amount of excavation 
done on the Panama canal during the same 
numl)cr of years of operation. It is only 
fair in comiection with these figures, how- 
ever, to bear in mind that the present rate 
of excavation in Panama is far more ra])id 
than that on the State barge canal. This, 
however, does not invalidate the force of the 
above comparisfju, as showing the magni- 
tude of the vv(5rk now l)eing done between 
Buft'alo and Albany. — Scientific American. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, l]^ 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 1^ Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 85 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., BufTalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of tlie 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Ofiices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepcstr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Scemannischer Arbeitcr, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmcr 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 

Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforhundct, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

Denmark. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenh.ivn, Toldbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kohcnhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond. 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 

Austria. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreiclis, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Fcderacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques V pnerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, I (Bar- 
celoneta) Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvetto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (.'\ltos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



The coiubiiicd unions ;il Bri)kcn 
Hill, Australia, are thinking of es- 
tablishing co-operative grocery, meat, 
produce, and wood stores, also a 
bakery. 

A recent conference of representa- 
tives of labor organizations in Syd- 
ney, Australia, decided upon immedi- 
ate affiliation with the unions in the 
Newcastle and Maitland districts. 

The net result of all the changes in 
British wages in July was a decrease 
of £619 per week, as compared with 
a decrease of £12,788 per week in 
June, and one of £17,144 per week in 
July, 1908. 

Summonses have been issued in 
Melbourne, .\ustralia, by the Federal 
Crown solicitor against five persons, 
who declined to answer questions in 
connection with wages, before the 
Harvester Commission. 

A statement was made recently by 
an Early Closing .\ct inspector in 
Sydney, Australia, that the awards 
under the wages board are being 
broken everywhere in New South 
Wales by the employing class. 

The Sydney (Australia) branch of 
the Shop Assistants and Warehouse 
Employes' l-'ederation has disked em- 
ployers to recognize the union badg.- 
and allow it to be worn by members 
of the federation during working 
hours. 

Dr. Hodgkin, when delivering a 
university lecture in Sydney, Aus- 
tralia, recently, declared that the fac- 
tory system, the great source of the 
national wealth of England, must be 
jealously watched, to prevent its de- 
generating into something like prac- 
tical slavery. 

Returns received from certain se- 
lected British ports (at which about 
83 per cent of the total tonnage in 
the foreign trade is entered and 
cleared), show that during July 47,094 
seamen, of whom 4,644 (or 9.9 per 
cent) were foreigners, were shipped 
on foreign-going vessels. 

Consequent on the adoption of the 
British Coal Mines Regulation Act;' 
1908, working hours of most of the 
underground workers in coal and iron- 
stf)ne mines in the United Kingdom 
(with the exception of those in North- 
umberland and Durham) were re- 
duced on July 1. 

In reply to an unemployed deputa- 
tion recently Premier Wade of New 
South Wales stated that all the State 
Government could do was to supply 
work either directly by Government 
works or provide facilities for those 
unemploye<l getting work from 
private employers. 

The Shop Assistants and Ware- 
house Employes' Federation of Aus- 
tralia has drawn up a claim in re- 
gard to hours and conditions of labor 
to be laid before the Federal Arbitra- 
tion Court. The claim has been 
agreed to by the branches in Victoria, 
New South Wales, Queensland, and 
South Australia. 

The total number of cases of poi- 
soning and of anthrax reported under 
the British Factory and Workshops 
Act during July was 73, consisting of 
60 cases of lead poisoning, 1 case of 
phosphorus poisoning, 1 of arsenic 
poisoning, and 11 cases of anthrax. 
Six deaths were reported during July, 
4 caused by lead poisoning, and 2 by 
anthrax. In addition to the above, 
18 cases of lead poisoning (4 of which 
were fatal) were reported among 
house painters and plumbers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LIPPM AN 


BROS. 


S32 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next 


to Fritz & Ernett 


SAN PEDRO CAL. 




COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 


OUTFITTERS 


Union Goods for Union 


Men 



CJIfiBUSTEU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

iUiGOMUTStf 



San Pedro Letter List. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to Inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stifl, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and oflEers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
seaman Ernst Dau, please notify the 
German Consul at San Francisco. 

James Thoburn was at the Sea- 
men's Institute about 1902. Letter 
awaiting him at 242 Steuart street, 
San Francisco. 

James Sample, last heard of on ship 
Santa Rita in .Xpril, 1909, is inquired 
for by Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart 
street. 

Arthur John Martin. Was in San 
Francisco last March. Any news of 
him sent to Seamen's Institute will be 
appreciated. 

Robert Fordyee Bowers, over 5 
feet in height, rather stout, was in 
American Navy during 1906. Letter 
awaiting him at Seamen's Institute, 
242 Steuart street, San Francisco. 

Robert Fordyee Bowers, age 33 
years, height over 5 feet, stout build; 
correspondence awaiting him at Sea- 
men's Institute, 242 Steuart street, San 
Francisco. 

Samuel England, age 48 years, com- 
municate with Seamen's Institute, 242 
Steuart street, San Francisco. 

John M. Murphy, dark hair, blue 
eyes, height 5 feet 8, smooth face. 
Last heard of at Oakland. Any in- 
forination, communicate Seamen's In- 
stitute, 242 Steuart street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Harry W. Morse, of 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 



LEVY'S DEFT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 614 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

LiOs Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



C. L. M UN SON 

Dealer in 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Andersson, Albin. 
Alander, O. J. 
lAmmusen, Martin 
! Anderson. A. 
Andersen, Hans J. 
Asplund, Emil 
Andersen, Harald 
Anderson, Henry 
Anderson, Oscar 
Axelsson, C. B. 
Apps, P. 

Anderson, O. -1286 
Bray, J. K. 
Bensen, Ray 
Bausbach, Brwin 
Bery, Charles 
Berger, Joe 
Berggren, G. -349 
Barrach, Herman 
Backman, Adolf 
Bjorsetb, Knut 
Bade, Alexander 
BorgKren, John 
Bolander, J. E. 
Broback, Charles E. 
Bersin, Jacob 
Carlsson, N. 
Christensen, Harry 
Carlson, C. G. F. 
Christiansen, Hj. 
Carlsson. A. 
Capello, H. 
Carlson, Chas. 
Celley, Edward 
Christenson, John 
Christiansen, -901 
Colombay, Louis 
Charlsen, Charlie 
Calnan, George 
Castro, Manuel 
Dahlman, J. A. 
Dories. J. H. 
Danielson, E. B. 

(Package) 
Englebrlght. Harry 
Ebapanen, W. 
Bngbretsen. -668 
Eiickinson. Eric 
Ellingsen, F. 
Erickson, Charley 
Fredriksen, H. G. 

-529 
Folvlg, John 
Fridlund, John 
Foldat, John 
Gelger, Josef 
Gustafson. Geo. 
Gray, Gustav 
Gliser. Walter 
Gulbrand.sen, A. 
Gliese. W. 
Hazzal, S. G. 
Hamiening, F. 
Holz. P. 
Ifeckman, Fred 
Holy, Otto -1764 
Hage. Arne 
Hansen, Bert 
Haupt, Emil 
Hansen. Haakon 
Hanson, Jacob 
Henrlksen, Aug. E. 
Holm. Stephan 
Ingbretsen. -668 
Ingebretsen, O. -125 
Johnson. F. -1911 
Jensen. J. -1801 
Johansen, C. -1191 
Jobson, Charles 
Jonsen. Thomas 
.lolinson. G. E. 
Jeshke, H. 



Jeffersen, V. 
Jacobson. John 
Jensen, J. H. -1311 
Johannsen. Christian 
Jansolm, J. -1440 
Kalberg, \V. -688 
Kattel. J. 
Karsberg, C. 
Knudsen, Billy 
Kruger, H. 
Lau, Gustav 
Lynd, Charley 
Larsen, Chris 
Long, Harry 
Lange, Frederlk 
Lunian, Alku 
Lawson, Jack 
Loeman, Charles 
Lund, Harry C. 
Lundstrom, Sam 
Lewis, G. 
Lactat, Victor 
Larsen, Marlnius 
Mulley, James 
McMahon, John 
McFadden, W. 
Manning, W. 
Muller, Hugo 
Melin, Einar 
Nestor, Wilson 
Nielsen, SIvert 
Nielsen, J. A. -780 
Nurml, Victor 
Nyberg, Erik 
Newman, John 
Osterholm, -867 
Olsen, Adolf 
Olesen, Geo. 
Olsson, Erik 
Olsen, Oluf 
Orten, Sigurd 
Ohm, Gunvall 
Oustad, Hans 
Olson, Bertel 
Owens, Joseph H. 
Peterson, Oscar C. 
Petersen, O. -864 
Peterson. F. G. 
Pagel, Erwin 
Pereltzes, H. 
Peratis, N. 
Paulsson, Adolf 
Panier, A. 
Passou, Teddy 
Petersen, W. -1284 
Peterson, Th. -563 
Raymond. J. 
Remmel, F. 
Robsham, Jens W. 
Rodriquez, Manuel 
Rosan, Oscar 
Ruter, Herman 
Seller, Willy 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Siverberg, Harry 
Svendsen, Otto F. 
Smith, J. S. 
Sorensen. -1664 
Soderstrom, A. I. 
Scott, Ed 
Svedstrup, E. 
Schlobies, Chas. 
Torres, Lojo. V. 
Torjussen, Gunvald 
Thorson, Tom 
Tillman, C. -763 
Vik, Jakob 
Vidal, Juan 
Wldln, Andrew 
"Westad, Johan 
Yager, A. 
Zimmerman, F. C. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 



Fourth street, 
Between Front and Beacon 
SAN PEDRO. 



SU., 



JACOB OLSBN 

Keeps the Best Bra.nd8 of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

Watertown, FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 



Mass., about 5 ft. 8, light hair, blue 
eyes, wore glasses. Enquiry from 
Lillian J. Morse. Letter awaiting him 
at Seamen's Institute, Steuart street, 
San Francisco. 



of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. i 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Tollat 

Article*. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Camille Moortgat, who arrived at 
San Francisco in September last, is 
inquired for by the Belgian Consulate 
at San Francisco. 

Donald Corsie, sailor, aged about 
55, left the Great Lakes in 1885 for 
the West Coast and probably Aus- 
tralia, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Wm. McLaughlin, Julius Franz, K. 
Grunert, J. Koglund, W. Wickstrom 
and C. Christensen, who were mem- 
bers of the crew of the schooner Min- 
nie E. Caine at the time of her wreck, 
are inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

B. H. Lewis, who left the British 
ship Pyrenees at San Francisco in 
the spring of 1901, is inquired for by 
the British Consul at San Francisco. 

Frank Posstethwaite, who left 
Monteagle at Vancouver, B. C, May 
26, 1906. Letter awaiting him at 
Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart street, 
San Francisco. .Any information 
gratefully received. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The Globe Grain and Milling Company of Los 
Angeles, San Francisco and Sacramento, has 
closed the lease of 500 feet of water-front in 
Portland and will erect on it one of the most 
complete grain handling plants in the Northwest. 

The port of Mulege, on the coast of Lower 
California, was overwhelmed by a tidal wave on 
September 4. There were several fatalities and 
considerable property was destroyed. The tidal 
wave flooded the inland district for a distance of 
about two miles. 

Kuno Delefson was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on September 17 as master 
of the steamer Cascade, vice J. G. Ludlow. The 
steamer Mayfair, A. Olson master, and the 
schooner Nina Cyrus, J. Rosendal master, were 
enrolled. 

The following vessels are reported spoken: 
French bark Charles Gounod, from Brest for 
Puget Sound, August 25, latitude S south, longi- 
tude 34 west; French bark Jean Bart, from Dun- 
kirk for Oregon, September 1, latitude 12 north, 
longitude 27 west. 

Captain Emil Franckc, who was in command 
of the Great Northern liner Dakota when that 
vessel was lost ofif the Japanese coast in March, 
1907, has been appointed superintendent of the 
northern district of the Pacific Coast Steamship 
Company. 

Oscar Thompson, mate of the steamer Kadiak, 
was arrested at San Francisco on September 15 
on complaint of John Sorenson, a deckhand, who 
alleges cruel and abusive treatment September 
10 while on the passage from Alaskan waters to 
San" Francisco. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the 
San Francisco Custom-house on September 15: 
Schooner George Washington, J. Olsen master; 
steamer Washtenaw, C. C. Graham, master; 
steamer Sioux, J. E. Hammond, master; steamer 
Arctic, M. Kalnin, master. 

Mat Daly, employed as a waiter on the steamer 
Breakwater, disappeared while the vessel was 
ofif Umpqua, on her way to Portland on Septem- 
ber 11. The case was reported by Captain Mc- 
Genn upon the arrival of the Breakwater on the 
12th. It is supposed that Daly fell overboard. 

Canned salmon worth over half a million dol- 
lars comprised the cargoes of five salmon packets 
which arrived at San Francisco on September 13 
and 14. The five vessels, the Tacoma. Star of 
Holland, Star of Chile, Sintram and Standard, 
brought in aggregate 250,000 cases. 

After an absence of five and one-half months, 
the schooner Czarina arrived at San Francisco on 
September 11 from codfishing in Bering Sea. She 
brought 115,000 codfish and 140 barrels of salmon 
to the Union Fish Company. The Czarina was 
eighteen days sailing from Pirate Cove. 

Badly disabled, the French bark Notre Dame 
d'Arbor, from Antwerp to Portland, which was 
in collision with an unknown ship off the English 
coast, has' been towed into Falmouth, according 
to advices received at Portland on September 11. 
A large portion of her cargo had been jettisoned. 

The latest report with regard to steamship 
service for the Grand Trunk Pacific is that the 
company is negotiating for two fine turbine liners, 
the Cairo and the Heliopolis, for service in the 
Pacific. The steamers are reported to be two of 
the finest in Great Britain and fitted up in the 
most costly style. 

Captain W. H. Patterson, a Columbia River 
pilot, was found guilty at Portland un September 
15 of negligence in causing a collision between 
the George W. Elder, which he was piloting, and 
the tug Daniel Kern, by which the latter was 
sunk on August 17. He was suspended for ten 
days. / 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 16: Steamer Point Arena, C. C. Flan- 
sen vice O. S. Johnson; steamer Hercules, H. G. 
Bell vice F. H. Cruthers; steamer Atlanta. H. W. 
Anderson vice R. W. Hanson; steamer Liberty, 
S. B. Randall vice A. C. Johnson. 

The wreck of the steamer Ohio will be adver- 
tised for sale on the Canadian side. Customs of- 
ficials having refused to permit an American 
vessel to salve the wreck. The fact that any at- 
tempt to save the cargo would be difficult and 
costly without cutting into the hull has delayed 
an agreement for the disposal of the wreck. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 14:- Steamer Point Arena, C. C. 
Hauser. vice O. S. Johnson; steamer Hercules, 
H. G. Bell, vice F. H. Cruthers; steamer Atlanta, 
Henry W. Anderson, vice R. W. Hanson. The 
steamer .Arctic. M. Kalnin, master, was enrolled. 

The well-known barkentine Archer, which for 
some time has been engaged solely in transport- 
ing lime fron; Roche Harbor to San Francisco, 
will now be engaged in the coastwise trade, carry- 
ing cement and general cargo from San Francisco 
to Puget Soun<l. The Archer will !)e e(|uipped 
with a gas-producing engine of 300 horsepower. 

Two more salmon packets arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on September 12. They were the Alaska 



Packers' ship Charles E. Moody, Captain Larsen, 
and the bark James Nesmith, Captain Campbell. 
The Moody was twenty-five days from Koggiung 
and brought 70,418 cases of salmon. The Nesmith 
was twenty-seven days from Naknek and had a 
cargo of 47,000 cases and 3000 barrels of salmon. 

With three of her crew seriously injured as a 
result of an explosion of a carbide buoy being 
refilled at San Juan harbor on the west coast of 
Vancouver Island, the tug William Jolliffe of the 
Canadian Marine Department returned to Vic- 
toria, B. C., on September 16. The injured men, 
Chief Officer James Moore, W. Caven and George 
Alexander, were conveyed to the hospital. All 
will recover. 

Jebsen and Ostrander, operating the German 
steamers Ella and Erna between San Francisco, 
Puget Sound and lower Coast points, have been 
admitted to the West Indies cofifee conference, a 
combination which controls practicaly all the cof- 
fee shipped from Salvador and Guatemala, the 
privileges of which heretofore have been enjoyed 
by the Pacific Mail Steamship Company and the 
Kosmos line. 

Launch owners on San Francisco Bay and 
tributaries have scored a victory from the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor in regard to the 
law that requires all small craft over fifteen tons 
to carry both a licensed engineer and pilot, life- 
boats, fire extinguishers and other equipment. 
Commissioner of Navigation E. T. Chamberlain 
has just decided that such craft arc exempt from 
the law. 

Laden with 5637 tons of coal for the use of the 
United States Navy, the British tramp Hynd- 
ford. Captain Home, arrived at San Francisco 
on September 17. sixty-seven days from Newport 
News, via the Straits. The Hyndford is one of 
a fleet of foreign bottoms that are on their way 
to San Francisco from the .Atlantic Coast with 
fuel for the Government bunkers at Mare Island 
and California City. 

The first consignment of California-grown 
hemp shipped from San Francisco was contained 
in the cargo of the American ship Astral, which 
sailed on September 17. bound for New York. 
The hemp was raised on an island in the San 
Joaquin, and is an experimental shipment, 
amounting to ISO tons. In addition to this the 
Astral had shipments of salmon, beans, fruit, 
lumber, wine, asphaltum and general merchandise. 
The vessel's cargo measured 5600 tons. 

Negotiations extending over two years have re- 
sulted in the decision of the American-Hawaiian 
Steamship Company to build a 6000-ton steel pas- 
senger steamship to be named the Honolulan, 
for service between the Hawaiian Islands and San 
Francisco. It is announced also that the com- 
pany has contracted for the building of two 
freight steamers, the Kentuckian and the Geor- 
gian, each of 6000 tons capacity. The steamers 
will be built by the Maryland. Steel Company at 
Sparrow Point, Md. 

Three salmon packets arrived at San Francisco 
on September 11 from the northern canneries. 
The Star of India was twenty-one days from 
Nushagak and brought 36,000 cases of salmon to 
the Alaska Packers. The bark Isaac Reed was 
thirty days from Naknek, and brought 55,000 
cases of salmon to the Alaska Packers. The 
schooner Salvator was twenty-eight days from 
Koggiung. The latter brought 4395 barrels of 
salmon to Peter Nelson. The Alaska Packers' 
ship Indiana, which arrived on the 10th from 
Nushagak, brought 45,000 cases of salmon. 

As a result of the wreck of the steamship Ohio 
and the subsequent investigation by the Marine 
Underwriters' agents in the vicinity of Sarah 
Island a complete change will be made in the in- 
side passage route. This will be especially true 
of the larger vessels with their deep draft, 
for the stranding of the Ohio has shown con- 
clusively that the passage where she hit is too 
treacherous to be used by the largest vessels on 
the run. In the future, instead of going on the 
east side of Sarah Island, as has been the custom 
of American vessels, they will take the passage 
on the west side of the island, which has been 
carefully sounded, chartered and buoyed by the 
Canadian Government. 



To Mariners: You will please take notice that 
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 
has installed and is maintaining between San 
Pedro and Terminal Island, one (1) subaqueous 
telephone and telegraph cable, 750 feet in length. 
That at said points said company will maintain 
monuments indicating the place where said cable 
lies. Do not drop anchor at these points. San 
Pedro, Cal, December, 1907. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years ai1_ offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., IViA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORIC, N. T., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 50 Union St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

• Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 674 West Madi.=on St. 

Branches: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main SL 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies: 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 305 French St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 11S5 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 63 East Kinzie St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y.. 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
'I'OLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St, 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St, 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the express.ions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 22. 1909. 



VOLUME TWENTY-THREE. 



This issue of the Journal l)cgins the twenty- 
third year of publication. Our readers will be 
interested in this announcement as a reminder 
of the flight of time. Seems like twenty-two 
weeks, or even days, since the Journal made 
its first bow. Now it is the oldest labor paper 
in the United States, according to the best of 
our knowledge and belief. Throughout these 
rears the Journal has been sustained by the 
kindness of its friends — readers, subscribers, 
and advertisers- — whicli kindness is hereby 
gratefully acknowledged. In setting out upon 
anotiier year, we besjieak a continuance of our 
friends' regard and offer tlio assui^ance of our 
continued effort to deserve tlie same. 



LXDINIDUAL ASSESSMENT. 



The "individual" assessment ordered by the 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific for the jnirpose 
of making good tlie amount advanced from 
the Union's treasury in aid of the Lake Dis- 
trict of the International Seamen's I'nion, is 
now due. Already a considerable ])ro])ortion 
of the members have paid the "individual" as- 
.sessment, tluis affording the best possible proof 
of the willingness and enthusiasm with which 
the members of the International in all districts 
have come to the aid of their comrades on (he 
Great Lakes. I'^or the benefit of those mem- 
bers of the Sailors' Union who have been at 
sea continuously during the recent past we 
publish herewith the resolution adopted by the 
Union on July 19, as follows: 

Section 1. Resolved, That an assessment of 
three (3.00) dollars is hereby levied upon each 
member, payable either as a whole or in two 
quarterly installments of $1.50 each for the pur- 
po.«e of recouping the treasury of this Union. 

Sec. 2. Assessment "shall be collected in pref- 
ence to monthly dues, and any member who has 
not paid the first installment thereof on or be- 
fore December .31, 1909, or the whole assessment 
on or before March 31, 1910, shall be deemed to 
be in bad standing regardless of his standing as 
to dues. E.xception is made in favor of mem- 
bers who are in good standing under this sec- 
tion "at the time of the vessel's departure." 
(Art. XIV, Sec. 67. of the Constitution.) 

Sec. 3. Members joining, transferring to, or re- 
instated in this Union on or before December 31, 
1900. shall ii.ay both inst.-illnicnts nf the assess- 



ment, and members joining, transferring or re- 
instated after such date shall pay the second in- 
stallment only. Probationary members shall not 
be admitted to full membership until their assess- 
ment has been paid. 

Sec. 4. Members desiring to take out Retiring 
Cards on or before December 31, 1909, shall pay 
the first installment, and members desiring to re- 
tire after such date must pay the assessment in 
full. Retiring members reporting back on or be- 
fore December 31, 1909, must pay both install- 
ments, and retired members reporting back after 
such date shall pay the second installment only. 

Sec. 5. Any member who can produce proof 
that "sickness actually prevented him from going 
to sea" (doctors' certificates or hospital dis- 
charges; see Resolution May 18, 1908) for a pe- 
riod of not less than thirty (30) days during the 
three months next preceding December 31, 1909, 
shall be exempt from payment of the first install- 
ment of the assessment; and any member who 
can show like proof of sickness tor a like period 
during the three months from December 31, 1909, 
shall be exempt from payment of the second in- 
stallment. Proof of illness in this case must be 
presented before the member in question accepts 
employment. Transferred members who can 
prove that they have paid the assessment to any 
other union affiliated with the International Sea- 
men's Union of America shall be exempt from 
paying the same to this Union. 

Sec. 6. Collection of assessment shall be con- 
tinued until otherwise ordered by the Union. 

A continuance of the present disposition of 
the members to pay the assessment promptly 
will greatly facilitate the business of the Union 
and aid in establishing a record which will go 
far to strengthen the loyalty and confidence 
of the members toward each other. 



"Al'T ON THE INJUNCTION. 



i 'resident Taft, in an address delivered at 
C'liicago on the 16th inst., made what is de- 
scribed by the press as a ".strong defense of 
labor's right to organize in a lawful manner." 
The substance of the President's "defense" 
.was merely a repetition of the sentiments gen- 
erally prevailing on the subject, even among 
those who are most pronounced in opposition 
to tile practical workings of the labor move- 
ment. On the subject of the Injunction the 
1 'resident was a little more definite. On this 
jioint Mr. Taft said : 

Xow that the election has come and gone, I 
w.int to take this opportunity of saying that I 
have not forgotten my own promises or those of 
the platform, and I propose in the next session 
of Congress to recommend the legislation on the 
subject of injunction which was promised in the 
Republican platform, and to see whether by 
such legislation it is not possible to avoid even 
a few cases of abuse that can be cited against 
the Federal courts in the exercise of their juris- 
diction. 

It is interesting to recall the language of 
the Re])ublican i)latform, wliich is as follows : 

The Republican party will uphold at all times 
the authority and integrity of the courts. State 
and Federal, and will ever insist that their 
powers to enforce their process and to protect 
life, liberty, and property shall be preserved in- 
violate. We believe, however, that the rules of 
procedure in the Federal courts with respect to 
the issuance of the writ of injunction should be 
more accurately defined by statute, and that no 
injunction, or temporary restraining order, should 
be issued without notice, except where irreparable 
injury would result from delay, in which case a 
speedy hearing thereafter should be granted. • 

This language, as was pointed out at the 
time of its adoption, so far from offering a 
remedy for the evil of "Government by Injunc- 
tion," really condoned and confirmed that evil. 
It now remains to be seen how Mr. Taft pro- 
poses to fulfil the pledges of his party. This 
we find in a later address, delivered at Des 
Moines on the 20th, in which he said: 

I am entirely opposed to excepting from the 
operation of any law of general application a 
class of persons like laborers or workingmen or 
farmers or ministers or teachers or lawyers. 
Take the present Anti-Trust law, therefore, and 
insert a special exception to the application of 
that law by providing that it should not apply 
to the trade-union class and it would be legis- 
lation of the most vicious character; but when 
you make the law apply only to conspiracies 



seeking to suppress competition or to monopolize 
the trade, then the labor boycott is probably not 
included, simply because the statute would not 
seem wide enough to include it in its scope, and 
this result is obtained without class legislation 
at all. 

I am in favor of this change because I believe 
that the ordinary action in equity by injunction 
in any place where the boycott is operative can 
effectively accomplish all the purposes that ought 
to be accomplished by the suppression of such 
an evil. On the other hand, to employ the Anti- 
Trust law for the purpose of suppressing evils 
growing out of the labor organizations is to 
take advantage against such unlawful organiza- 
tions of the literal terms of a statute which prob- 
ably was not intended to include that which ju- 
dicial construction could not avoid including 
within its words. 

In brief, it is the President's purpose to rec- 
ommend an amendment to the Anti-Trust law 
which will extend the "conspiracy" provisions 
of that measure to the labor organizations. 
The President would have the law specifically 
l)rovide for the suppression of the boycott, a 
thing that can only be done at present by a 
"stretch of construction." Of course, this 
proposal is quite in keeping with the promises 
and pledges made by the Republican party in 
the last campaign. 

Reverting to the President's Chicago speech 

of the 16th, we find the following among the 

features of that "strong defense of labor's 

right to organize in a lawful manner" : 

Of course, when organized labor permits itself 
to sympathize with violent methods, with 
breaches of the law, with boycotts and other 
methods of undue duress, it is not entitled to our 
sympathy. But it is not to be expected that such 
organizations shall be perfect, and that they may 
not at all times and in particular cases show de- 
fective tendencies that ought to be corrected. 

Here we have the President's conception of 
the boycott as a mea.sure of "undue duress." 
to be corrected by the method of classing it 
as a "conspiracy." Throughout Mr. Taft's 
"strong defense" nothing is said that more 
clearly indicates that gentleman's misunder- 
standing of the labor movement than his ex- 
])ressions on the "leveling tendency" of the 
labor movement. Upon this point the Presi- 
dent says : 

One defect which has been pointed out has 
been the disposition of inajority members in 
labor unions to reduce the compensation of all 
men engaged in a particular trade to a dead level 
and to fail to recognize the difference between 
the highly skilled and very industrious workman 
and the one only less skilled and less industrious. 
T think there is a movement among trade-unions 
themselves to correct this leveling tendency, and 
nothing could strengthen the movement more 
than the adoption of some plan by which there 
should remain among union workmen the impetus 
and motive to be found in greater reward for 
greater skill and greater industry. 

Here we have an idea that is as old as it 
is erroneous, namely, that organized labor 
"keeps down tlie wages of all to the level of 
the least skilled and industrious." This idea 
grows out of a mistaken conception of the 
"minimum wage." Those who claim to speak 
with authority upon labor questions ought to 
know, and generally do know, that the "mini- 
mum wage" is not necessarily designed to be 
the wage of all men employed in a given trade, 
but is merely the lowest wage that may be 
paid to any man. There is nothing in the 
"minimum wage" rule, or in any other rule of 
the labor movement, which prohibits an em- 
ployer from paying a higher wage to the more 
skilled or more industrious among his em- 
ployes. So far as the "leveling tendency" of 
the "minimum wage" is concerned, it remains 
to be said that that tendency is upward. Re- 
move the "ininimum wage," and the tendency 
of all wages would be downw-ard. And this is 
])recisely what the critics of the "ininimum 
wage" desire, although, of course, they affect 
the opposite disposition. 



Demand the union label on all purchases 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A. F. OF L. CONVENTION CALL. 



American Federation of Labor, 
Headquarters, 801-809 G Street N. W., 
Washington, D. C, 

September U, 1909. 
To All Affiliated Unions, Greeting: You 
are hereby advised that, in pursuance to the 
Constitution of the American Federation of 
Labor, the Twenty-ninth Annual Convention 
of the American Federation of Labor will 
be held at Toronto, Ontario, Canada, begin- 
ning at ten o'clock Monday morning, No- 
vember 8, 1909, and will continue in session 
from day to day until the business of the 
Convention has been completed. 

Representation. 

Representation in the Convention will be on 
the following basis : From National or Inter- 
national Unions, for less than 4,000 members, 
one delegate ; 4,000 or more, two delegates ; 
8,000 or more, three delegates ; 16,000 or more, 
four delegates ; 32,000 or more, five delegates ; 
64,000 or more, six delegates; 128,000 or more, 
seven delegates, and so on ; and from Central 
Bodies and State Federations, and from local 
trade unions not having a National or Interna- 
tional Union, and from Federal Labor Unions, 
one delegate. 

Organizations to be entitled to representa- 
tion must have obtained a certificate of affilia- 
tion (charter) at least one month prior to the 
Convention ; and no person will be recognized 
as a delegate who is not a member in good 
standing of the organization he is elected to 
represent. 

Only bona fide wage workers, who are 
not members of or eligible to membership 
in other trade unions, are eligible as dele- 
GATES FROM Federal Labor Unions. 

Delegates must be selected at least two weeks 
previous to the Convention, and their names 
forwarded to the Secretary of the American 
Federation of Labor immediately after their 
election. 

Delegates are not entitled to seats in the 
Convention unless the tax of their organiza- 
tions has been paid in full to September 30, 
1909. 

It is, of course, entirely unnecessary here to 
enumerate the imminent important subjects 
with which our forthcoming Convention will 
concern itself, but the reminder is not at all 
amiss that every effort must be made to broad- 
en the field and means for the organization of 
the yet unorganized workers, to strive more 
effectually than ever to bring about a better 
day in the lives and homes pf the toilers, to 
defend and maintain by every honorable means 
in our power the right to organize for our 
common defense and advancement, and to as- 
sert at any risk the freedom of speech and of 
the i)ress. The Convention will also decide 
upon a closer afiiliation with the organized 
trade-union movement of Europe. These and 
other great questions of equal importance will, 
of necessity, occupy the attention of the To- 
ronto Convention. 

Therefore the importance of our organ- 
izations AND OUR MOVEMENT, THE DUTY OF 
THE HOUR AND FOR THE FUTURE, DEMAND THAT 
EVERY 0RGANIZ.\TI0N ENTITLED TO REPRESEN- 
TATION SHALL SEND ITS FULL QUOTA OF DELE- 
G.\TES TO THE ToRONTO CONVENTION, NOVEM- 
BER 8, 1909. 

Do NOT ALLOW FAVORITISM TO INFLUENCE 
YOU IN SELECTING YOUR DELEGATES. Re FULLY 
REPRESENTED. 



Be REPRESENTED BY YOUR ABLEST, BEST, MOST 
E.XPERIENCED, AND FAITHFUL MEMBERS. 

Credentials. 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to all 
affiliated unions. The original credential 
must be given to the delegate-elect and the du- 
plicate forwarded to the American Federa- 
tion OF Labor office, 801-809 G. Street North- 
west, Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Credentials will meet at 
the headquarters of the American Federation 
of Labor six days previous to the opening of 
the Convention, and will report immediately 
upon the opening thereof at Toronto ; hence 
secretaries will observe the necessity of mail- 
ing the duplicate credentials of their respective 
delegates at the earliest possible moment to 
Washington, D. C. 

Grievances. 

Lender the law no grievance can be con- 
sidered by the Convention that has been de- 
cided b}' a previous Convention, except upon 
the recommendation of the Executive Council, 
nor will any grievance be considered where the 
])arties thereto have not previously held con- 
ference and attempted to adjust the same them- 
selves. 

Railroad Rates. 

The various Passenger Associations have 
been requested to grant a special rate. Full 
])articulars relative to Railroad Rates will be 
mailed to each delegate as soon as his creden- 
tial is received at American Federation of 
Labor headquarters. 

Reservations in any of the hotels can be 
made by addressing the Chairman of the Con- 
vention Committee, D. A. Carey, 95 Markham 
.Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Headquarters of the Executive Council will 
be at the Prince George Hotel. 

Delegates should notify Chairman D. A. 
Carey of the time of their arrival at Toronto, 
and over which road they will travel. 

If there be any further information regard- 
ing the Convention, or the arrangements for 
the convenience of the delegates, it will be 
communicated in a later circular, or through 
the American Federationist. 

Samuel Gompers, President. 

Attest : 

Frank Morrlson, Secretary. 

James Duncan, First Vice-President ; John 
Mitchell, Second Vice-President ; James 
O'Connell, Third Vice-President ; D. A. Hayes, 
I'ourth Vice-President ; Wm. D. Huber, Fifth 
\ ice-1'resident ; Jos. I". Valentine, Sixth Vice- 
President ; John R. Alpine, Seventh Vice- 
President; H. B. Perham, Eighth Vice-Presi- 
dent ; John B. Lennon, Treasurer, Executive 
Council American l*"c(leration of Labor. 



As a part of a national movement for bet- 
ter preservation of the teeth several Ger- 
man cities are providing free dental treat- 
ment for school children. 



A pineapple cannery in Formosa, man- 
aged by Japanese, also extracts the long fiber 
from the leaf of the fruit for use in the 
manufacture of grass cloth. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Ilendqiiarters, Boston, Mass.. Sept. 15, 1909. 
Shipping and prospects good. 

WM. TI, FR.AZIER, Secretary. 
\'/,.\ Lewis St. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 20, 1909. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7:30 p. m., P. Scharrenberg presiding. Secre- 
tary reported shipping fair. The Shipwreck Bene- 
fit was ordered paid to members wrecked in the 
steam-schooner Fair Oaks. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 
44-46 East St., Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Agency, Sept. 13, 1909. 
F'rospects for the future good. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 13, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
pro.spccts uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 13, 1909. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend .'\gency, Sept. 13, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fairly good; 
prospects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
2291^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



.Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 13, 1909. 
Shipping situation unchanged. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 62. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Sept. 13, 1909. 
Situation unchanged. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 12, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping poor; pros- 
pects fair. 

JOHN W. ERTCKSEN. Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 13, 1909. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 7, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping good; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Hcad(|uartcrs, San Francisco, Gal., Sept. 16, 1909. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Rurke in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slack. The Shipwreck Benefit was 
ordered paid to two members of the steam- 
schooner Randon. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 9. 1909. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. Phone Sun Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 9, 1909. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headeiuarters, Chicago, Sept. 13, 1909. 
General situation unchanged. 

V. A. OLANDER. Secretary. 

143 West Madison St. 



DIED. 

Nicolas Aro, No. 1309. a native of Russia, aged 
27 died at Nushagak, Alaska, on June 12, 1909. 

Vincent Chevalier, No. 10,38, a native of France, 
aged 31, drowned from the codRshing brigantmc 
H;'r'-iet G. in .Alaska waters, sea.son of 1909. 

Fred Dalman, No. 285, a native of Russia, aged 
33, died in Nushagak, Alaska, on June 24, 1909. 

Olaf Olsen Heller, No. 1664, a native of Nor- 
way, aged .W, died at Astoria, Or., on Sept. 7, 
1909. 

Peter H. Mathiesen, No, 1173. a native of Ger- 
many, aged 27, drowned at Nushagak, Alaska, on 
June 10, 1909. 

Albert Woods, No. 121, a native of Massachu- 
setts aged 33. died at Eureka, Cal., August. 1909. 



COAST SEAMEN'S TOURNAL. 



*^^* 




ON THE OREAT LAKES. 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




iC'vS^ 



FAKE PENALTIES IMPOSED. 



On August 30, Captain Samuel Masscy, of 
Cleveland, of the steamer D. R. Hanna, of 
the Hutchinson fleet, was found guilty of 
misconduct by the United States Inspectors 
of Steam Vessels, at Toledo, and they de- 
creed that his license be suspended for thir- 
ty days. 

The charges were made by Inspector 
Fluckey, of the Immigration Department, 
who alleged that Massey violated the Alien 
Contract Labor law during the strike early 
in the season. He also averred that when 
he went onto the Hanna to arrest Daniel 
La Rush, one of the crew, Captain Massey 
threatened him with bodily harm. He also 
charged that Massey substituted another 
man for the one wanted by the Inspector. 

Captain James Stone, who is Supervising 
Inspector of the district, listened to an ap- 
peal by Massey's attorneys, and decided 
against the accused, sustaining the verdict 
of the Toledo Inspector. 

Captain Stone's decision follows: 

"The Board of Local Inspectors at To- 
ledo, before whom the trial was had, found 
the captain guilty of misconduct, as pre- 
scribed under section 4450 R. S. On August 
31 an appeal was taken from the decision. 
Attorney Masten presented his arguments 
on behalf of his client. Captain Massey, 
claiming that the Steamboat Inspection 
Service had no jurisdiction in the case, as 
the actions of the master in trving to de- 
ceive, mislead and obstruct the United 
States Immigrant Inspector from arresting a 
member of his crew, did not constitute an 
offense and misconduct while acting under 
the authority of his license, as provided in 
section 4450 R. S., with which \ icw I do not 
coincide. 

"In my opinion, the master of a steamer 
being on board, and in direct charge of his 
steamer, any action of his regarding the ship 
and her crew is done while acting under the 
authority of his license, by which authority 
he is in absolute command, whether in port 
or outside, and he can not at will cease to be 
the responsible master of his ship, while 
thus engaged. The fact of the captain's 
guilt was clearly proven, and not denied by 
his attorneys. 

"I, therefore, find by the evidence before 
me that Ca])tain Masse)' was guilty of mis- 
conduct, as provided in section 4450 R. S., 
in obstructing a United States officer while 
in the performance of his official duties. The 
action of the local board is, therefore, sus- 
tained." 

At Conncaut, Scptfml)cr 11,1 met Ca])taiii 
Massey in the bank. He is still sailing the 
D. R. Hanna, and the United States Inspec- 
tors are not making any kick. They are 
fakes and under control of the owners. 
These fines and suspensions are all fakes to 
quiet the nerves of people not "in the know." 

Conneaut, O. W. H. Jexkins. 



MANY VESSELS UNDER CONTRACT. 



The Chilean Congress has abrogated a 
contract made by President Montt with a 
French company for harbor improvements 
at Valparaiso, which were to have cost 
$19,466,000. 



Prosperity in the Lake shipbuilding busi- 
ness is coming with a rush. At the rate that 
orders for new vessels have been placed dur- 
ing the past two weeks all the building 
berths for early delivery in 1910 will soon 
be taken. One company has lined up about 
all the business it can handle for early de- 
livery next season. 

The Pittsburg Steam.ship Company, which 
is the Lake end of the United States Steel 
Corporation, has placed an order for three 
freighters of the largest class with the Great 
Lakes Engineering Works of Detroit. The 
deal was closed by H. Coulby, president and 
general manager of the steamship company, 
and A. C. Pessano, president of the ship- 
building company. 

This makes five 600-foot steamers that the 
Pittsburg Steamship Company has ordered 
to come out next year, and shows that the 
officials of the Steel Corporation not only 
have confidence in the future business, but 
look for a big sea.son in 1910. Two of the 
big ships, contracts for which were closed 
some time ago, will be built at the Lorain 
yard of the American Shipbuilding Com- 
pany. 

The three steamers ordered recently will 
be duplicates of the Thomas F. Cole and 
other boats of that class that have been built 
by the Pittsburg Steamship Comi)any dur- 
ing the past few years. 

The boats will be 600 feet over all, 580 
feet keel, 58 feet beam and 32 feet deep. 
They will have triple expansion engines and 
Scotch boilers. The new ships, which will 
have a carrying capacity of 12,000 tons each, 
will have 34 hatches. 

The price was not given out, but the boats 
will cost something more than $400,000 
each. They will be built at the Ecorse yard 
and about 15,000 tons of steel will be used 
in their construction. The material will of 
course be furnished by the United States 
Steel Corporation. President Pessano said 
that work on the new boats will be started 
as soon as the plates and shapes arrive at 
the shipyard. 

The five new boats ordered by the Steel 
Trust this year will have a carrying capacity 
of about 1,250,000 tons in a season and will 
be a big addition to the fleet, which is now 
the largest carrying the American flag. 

Next season the Pittsburg Steamship 
Company will have fifteen (lOO-foot steamers 
and nineteen vessels of more than 10,000 
tons capacity. In a full season the nineteen 
steamers will move about 6.250,000 tons. All 
the big carriers have been built since Mr. 
Coulby took charge of the Steel Trust fleet 
in 1905. 

The Great Lakes Engineering Works has 
booked orders for seven vessels, six bulk 
freight steamers and a package freighter for 
1910 delivery. The .American Shipbuildinp 
Company has orders for nine steamers, mak- 
ing a total of sixteen vessels that the Lake 
builders have under contract for 1910 de- 
liverv. 



LAKE LEVELS FOR AUGUST. 



The United States Lake Survey reports 
the stages of the Great Lakes for the UKMith 
of .'\ugust, 1909, as follows : 

Feet above tide water. 

Lakes. New York. 

Superior 602.42 

Michigan-Huron 581.04 

Erie 572.79 

Ontario 246.82 

Since last month Lake Superior has risen 
three inches. Lakes Michigan-Huron have 
fallen one inch, Lake Erie has fallen three 
inches and Lake Ontario four inches. 

During September Lake Superior is likely 
to rise one and one-quarter inches, Lakes 
Michigan-Huron are likely to fall two 
inches. Lake Erie is likeh' to fall three and 
one-quarter inches and Lake Ontario five 
inches. 

Lake Superior is seven and one-half 
inches lower than the average August stage 
of the past ten years and six inches lower 
than last year. It is six and one-half inches 
higher than in July, 1892, but eleven and 
one-quarter inches lower than in 1899 and 
ten inches lower than in 1903. 

Lakes ]\Iichigan-Huron show a stage one 
and three-quarter inches lower than the 
average .August stage of the past ten years 
and eight inches lower than last year, but 
fourteen inches higher than in .August, 1896. 
In .August, 1885, the water was twenty- 
seven and three-quarters inches higher. 

Lake Erie is one and one-half inches 
above the mean August stage of the past 
ten years and four and one-quarter inches 
lower than in .August last year, but seven- 
teen inches higher than in 1895. It is fifteen 
and three-quarter inches lower than in 
.August, 1876, and fifteen and three-quarter 
inches lower than in .August, 1883. 

Lake Ontario is four and one-half inches 
higher than the average August stage of the 
past ten years and thirteen and one-half 
inches lower than in .August last year. In 
1870 it was thirteen and three-quarter inches 
higher, and in 1883 twelve and one-quarter 
inches higher than in 1909. In August, 1895, 
it was twenty-nine and three-quarter inches 
lower than this year. 



Within a few days contractors will start 
construction of a concrete pier at the head 
of the Canadian locks which will cost in the 
neighborhood of $75,000. The old wooden 
piers, which were put in when the lock was 
constructed, are worn out. The work is ex- 
pected to be completed by the opening of 
navigation next spring. The Canadian Gov- 
ernment is about to replace the old fog horn 
on Caribou Island with another plant cost- 
ing about $50,000. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns ! 



William Livingstone, President of the 
Lake Carriers' Association, issues the fol- 
low notice to mariners: The light exhibited 
on Courtright buoy in the St. Clair River is 
occulting. This is an error. The Canadian 
Government advises that the light will be 
changed and fixed white on or about the first 
of October. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



LAKE SEAMEN ON PARADE. 



Conneaut, Ashtabula and Erie celebrated 
La.. or Day at Erie. Promptly at 7 a. m. the 
Conneaut Central Labor Union and affili- 
ated bodies formed on the main street at 
Conneaut and with the band leading 
marched to the Bessemer Railway station, 
where a special train of ten coaches was 
waiting to take the participants to Erie. 

The Lake Seamen's Union pickets at Con- 
neaut and Ashtabula, together with Com- 
rade McCoy and your humble servant, were 
in line. The Seamen carried two banners, 
each thirty feet long, as follows : 

International Seamen's Union of 

America. 
Sailors, Firemen and Cooks Are On 
Strike. Don't Be a Strike Breaker. 
Each banner was carried by three mem- 
1)ers and attracted a great deal of favor- 
able comment. The Seamen were given the 
place of honor in the line. Arriving at Erie 
we were met by a band of fifty pieces which 
escorted us to our place in the line. Com- 
rades Johnson, of the Seamen, and Leibold, 
of the Firemen, were on hand with about 
125 men to swell our ranks, and again the 
Seamen with their strike banners were 
given the place of honor. Thousands upon 
thousands viewing the parade read the ap- 
peal of the Seamen, "Don't Be a Strike 
Breaker," and were impressed. The Seamen 
also scattered handbills along- the line of 
march. These bills were especially gotten 
up for the occasion by General Secretary 
Olander, and were a strong argument for 
the Seamen. 

Conneaut, O. W. IT. Jenkins. 



ACCIDENTS OF A WEEK. 



Sault Stc. Marie, Sept. 6. — After lightering 400 
tons of her cargo of iron ore the steamer Arthur 
H. Hawgood was released from the bottom near 
the upper end of Canadian canal and brought to 
the pier on the American side. 
^ Divers this evening finished the worlv of put- 
ting on a cement patch in the forward compart- 
ment. She will leave to-morrow morning. 



Escanaba, Mich., Sept. 4,— Bound for BufTalo 
with a cargo of 11,000 tons of iron ore, the 
steamer LeGrand S. DeGrafT grounded on Sand 
Point last night. The steamer is one of the 
largest on the Lakes. She is hard on the bottom. 
The DeGrafif was loaded at the St. Paul dock, 
leaving shortly before 10 o'clock last night. The 
steamer measures 7,971 gross tons, is 585 feet long 
with 60-foot beam. She was built in 1907, and is 
owned by the Western Transit Company, of 
North Tonawanda, N. Y. 



The Crete completed her repairs at Lorain 
Friday at noon. 



Tlic steamer George L. Craig is being re- 
paired at Toledo as a result of her collision with 
the steamer Collingwood. 



The Abraham Stearns is undergoing bottom rc- 
IKiirs at the Lorain drydock. 



The Brazil, which was in No. 1 drydock in 
this city. Cleveland, came out yesterday and 
went to Toledo to load coal. 



Detroit, Sept. 3. — The steamer Western Star 
was aground at Bar Point, but was released this 
morning by the tug Harding. She is not believed 
to be injured. 



The steamer German which was aground at 
Big Point was released yesterday and she re- 
loaded the lightered ore. 



The steamer Northern Queen mcl wiih an ac- 
cident to her engines in Lake Superior yesterday 
and she was towed to Duluth. 



Detroit, Sept. 9. — The steamer L. C. Smith is 
having a new low pressure cylinder put in by the 
Detroit Shipbuilding Company. .She will be 
here until the end of the week. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



SOME "WELFARE" WORK. 



Detroit, Sept. 6. — Since early yesterday 
the tug Harding has been having a busy 
time of it at the St. Clair flats ship canal, 
having worked on three ships that went on 
the bank below the lower entrance to the 
canal. 

The steamers Joseph G. Butler and the 
Frederick B. Wells, bound up, were at- 
tended to first. Both were released without 
lightering, though the Wells was listed six 
or eight inches. 

Later the steamer B. F. Berry, also bound 
up, went on in the same neighborhood. The 
Harding was not able to get her off, and this 
morning she took the lighter Rescue up to 
the stranded boat and a part of her coal 
cargo has been taken ofif. 

The barges Sagamore and George Hart- 
ncll were in collision ofif Turtle light, To- 
ledo, Thursday night. The Sagamore, bound 
out, was in tow of the tug A. W. Colton and 
the Hartnell was bound for Toledo in tow 
of the steamer Harvey H. Brown when the 
collision occurred. The Sagamore has five 
damaged plates and it will take a week to 
make repairs on her. 

The Sagamore is having a run of bad luck. 
She left the yard of the Toledo Shipbuilding 
Company Thursday, where she had been for 
two weeks making repairs. She was towed 
back to the shipyard. 



Sault Ste. Marie, Sept. 9. — The steamer 
Senator, which was sunk near Detour, was 
floated this afternoon after about 2,000 tons 
of her ore cargo was removed. She was 
pumped out and was taken from her resting 
place on Pine Island reef. 

The wreckers are having no trouble in 
keeping her clear. Fires have been started 
under her boilers. She will be taken to a 
dock at Detour to-morrow, where the work 
of putting her in shape for taking her to 
Cleveland will be completed. 



Detroit, Sept. 9. — A Hungarian fireman 
on the steamer vSharples was scalded about 
the hands to-day while she. was coming 
down the St. Clair River, owing to a flue 
blowing out of the boiler. The steamer is 
at the Detroit Shipbuilding Company plant 
for repairs. The fireman had his wounds 
dressed at the Marine Hospital. 



TOLEDO'S NEW DRYDOCK. 



Captain C. E. Benham, the Lake Survey 
expert, said recently that the new drydock 
that is now under course of construction 
at Toledo will be one of the finest in the 
country. It will have walls of concrete, and 
will be built on a bed of solid clay. It will 
be most complete in the way of moorings 
and fastenings for boats. The entrance will 
be in such shape that there will be no in- 
terference with the concrete when the boats 
are being placed in the drydock. The forma- 
tion outside the entrance is encased in steel 
to protect the concrete, and the construction 
is such that there are no corners which 
would come in contact with the vessels en- 
tering. The gate is 94 feet wide in the clear, 
and the base 85. The concrete walls at the 
bottom' arc 14 feet solid through. Vessels 
will be launched into the drydock from the 
ways when the new structure is completed. 
It will be over 700 feet long, so that the 



largest ships on the Lakes may be accom- 
modated there. It is understood that 
Charles A. Calder, general manager of the 
Toledo Shipbuilding Company, designed the 
new drydock. He was formerly chief engi- 
neer for M. A. Hanna & Co. 



FIREMAN CLAIMS DAMAGES. 



A libel of $25,000 on the steamer James 
E. Davidson has been filed in the United 
States Court at Detroit as a result of the 
explosion on the vessel in the St. Clair River 
last month. The case is brought by Cleve 
Mason, who was badly scalded about the 
face, arms and legs. 

He claims that the boat was short 
handed and that the assistant engineers were 
incompetent, causing the boiler trouble, and 
that the boat stopped in the St. Mary's 
River ten hours to repair the boilers. Mason 
asserts he has been injured internally. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frank Donnelly is inquired for by his 
mother, Mrs. Eva Donnelly, 1317 Clark St., 
Racine, Wis. 



L. F. Sweeney, No. 3132, Lake Seamen's 
LTnion, is anxiously inquired for by his 
family. Address K. Murphy, 541 North 
Clark street, Chicago, Ills. 



Fred Smith, No. 9872, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is wanted by his mother, at Buflfalo, 
N. Y. Any one knowing his address please 
communicate with W. L. Smith, 55 Main 
St., Bufifalo, N. Y. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Teleplione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Teleplione 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Bell Phone East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, Wis 515 East Second Street 

.Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada Box 235 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

SUB-AGENCIES: 

MANITOWOC, Wis 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, Pa 305 French Street 

Telephone Bell 682. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 

HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O; 

RELreF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Esfnnaba. Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Gra-.J Haven. Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Mich. Sheboygan, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludington, Mich. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



PROGRESS IN SURGERY. 



In a recent account of the progress in 
surgery during the past fifteen years, a 
noted American surgeon, Dr. \A'. W. Keen, 
points out that the remarkable success 
achieved has been due chiefly to experi- 
mental research. In ordinary language, this 
somewhat professional phrase means that 
cats, guinea pigs and rabbits are used to 
test the theories of medical investigators, 
and that the success or failure attending the 
experiments forms the basis for the subse- 
quent treatment of the maladies of mankind. 

Foremost in modern surgical achieve- 
ments Dr. Keen places operations involving 
the heart and arteries. The year 1897 
marked the first successful attempt to sew 
up the heart ; since then there have been 
114 similar operations, with sixty-four re- 
coveries. In the treatment of wounds of 
the arteries the old method of tying up the 
artery above and below the wound" com- 
monly led to gangrene in the limb, from 
which the blood supply was cut off. This 
disastrous sequence has been almost en- 
tirely eliminated in recent times by the 
adoption of methods following the outcome of 
numberless experiments on animals. 

In like manner, according to Dr. Keen, 
the direct transfusion of blood, the trans- 
planting of healthy bone in the place of 
diseased portions, the cure of goitre, and 
the marked success that has followed the 
use of serum in diplitlieria. hydrophobia, 
and cerebro-spinal meningitis in human be- 
ings is due to the long series of experi- 
ments on the dumb creation in the labora- 
tories of the surgeon. The cure of many 
infectious diseases in animals tlicmsclves 
has been discovered in the same way. 

Here is a strong defense of vivisection. 
In considering its justness one does not 
need to vilify the wielder of the scalj^el, nor 
sneer at the sentiment of the anti-vivisec- 
tionist. It is hardly conceivable that men 
who devote all their efforts to the ameliora- 
tion of suffering would ruthlessly inflict 
pain on any creature. The test of their de- 
votion has been evident by the fact that in 
cases where experiments on animals were 
futile, they have jeopardized their own lives 
in the pursuit of healing knowledge. The 
words on Lazear's tablet — he who offered 
himself willingly to the yellow fever tests 
in Cuba — commemorate this truth, "With 
more than the courage and devotion of the 
soldier he ri.sked and lost his life to show 
how a fearful pestilence is communicated, 
and how its ravages may be prevented." 

Granting the necessity for these experi- 
ments, the friends of the animals may still 
find many opportunities for the exercise of 
their protective care. To them and to the 
doctors may be commended the full tenor 
of the couplet from "The Ancient Mariner"; 
He prayeth well who loveth well 
Both man and bird and beast. 

— Washington Post. 



KILLING THE SALMON. 



The 800-foot bridge over the Yellow- 
River at Lanchowfu, China, in the province 
of Kansu, is nearing completion. .Ml ma- 
terials had to be conveyed nearly 1,000 miles 
in carts. 



Ten thousand people are in the salmon- 
catching and canning business. The sea- 
son is short and the harvest is said to be 
uncertain. The salmon run, as it is called — 
the plunge of the mating pairs to the nest- 
ing grounds far up stream from the sea, 
lasts from one to three weeks only. Yet 
4.000,000 to 5,000,000 cases, each contain- 
ing forty-eight one-pound cans, are packed 
annually, with 42,000.000 fish, and the mar- 
ket value of tlie product is $28,000,000. 
There are 200 canning plants along the Pa- 
cific Coast from California to Alaska and 
so many thousands of snares for the finny 
victims that newcomers in the trade ac- 
tually have difficulty to find places in which 
to spread their own decoys. 

It is a short time they have and the work 
is fast and furious, and has in it all the 
ruthlessness of other such killings. The 
fish must be dressed and canned while they 
are fresh and firm, and the speed to handle 
at the canneries the huge takes of the mul- 
titude of fishermen must be great. The 
hands of men are too slow for the w-ork. 
Even specialist.s — and there were multitudes 
of them a very few years since — in the art 
of cleaning fish, are useless. A short time 
ago, thousands of Chinese employed in the 
canneries, who did nothing else and knew 
almost nothing else but to wield the knife 
over the salmon, worked with almost in- 
credible skill to keep pace with the supply. 
Now a machine, called the Iron Chink, be- 
cause it does the human Chink's work — or 
rather the work of many Chinks — is estab- 
lished in each factory and turns the shining 
river beauties into eatables at the rate of 
t)ne a second instead of the hand-rate of 
one a minute that used to be a boast. A 
two-horsc-])ower engine thus does the work 
of sixty Chinese workers, for each machine 
contents itself with so little power. — Tech- 
nical World Magazine. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATTORM. 



Delegates from thirty-three countries at- 
tended the recent international congress of 
refrigerating industries at Paris and formed 
a permanent association. 



CANADIAN LINE TO MEXICO. 



The Canadian Cjovernment has decided 
to increase its annual subsidy for steam- 
ship service to Mexico on the Pacific Coast 
from $.=^0,000 a year to $75,000 during the 
current year beginning April, 1909. This 
action has been taken on account of the 
fact that the Mexican Government has with- 
drawn its annual subsidy of $50,000 to this 
steamship line, and the Canadian Govern- 
ment desires to maintain a freight service 
in connection with the Tehuantepec Rail- 
way. It is stated that freight is transported 
via this route at a very considerable less 
rate than by the direct transcontinental 
route and with the loss of only a few days' 
time. The steamships of this Mexican Pa- 
cific line carried only 3,000 tons of freight 
from Mexico to Canada and 16,000 tons 
from Canada to Mexico during the last 
year, and most of this latter freight was 
destined for European ports via the Tehuan- 
tepec Railway. 



.\ccording to the annual railway report 
11 persons are killed or injured on the In- 
dian railways every 24 hours. The num- 
ber reported killed during the year- 1908-9 
was 2,137. and the number injured was 
1,852, which is larger than any previous 
year and double the figures of killed and 
injured in 1904, 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
;uk1 bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEIM'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page &.) 

•PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C. 122 Alexander St., P. O. Box 
1365. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

AUKKDEBN, Wash.. P. O. Box 62. 

poKTI>.\ND, Dr., 51 Union Ave. 

EI'REKA, Cal.. 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

S\X T'iCI)Rf>. •"al.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: . 
SK.\TTT-E. Wash.. Uns", Western Ave., P. O. 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, W'ash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

ASTORL\, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. ...„„. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. . , .. „> 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. , », ,, 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SE.^TTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. „ 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the- above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

ITDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



MAKE-UP OF THE SKYSCRAPER. 



If one of New A'ork's modern skyscrapers 
such as the Metropolitan Life or the Singer 
building, with their cloud-piercing towers, 
could be picked up bodily and dropped on 
some prairies there would be practically 
everything needed to start a little city, in- 
cluding the population. 

Take the Singer building, for instance. It 
contains 136 miles of various kinds of metal 
piping. The telephones., elevators, electric 
lights, fans and clocks require 3425 miles of 
wire, which, if stretched out, would extend 
from the top of the Singer building to the 
top of Eiffel tower in Paris, with 300 miles 
left over. The steel used in the construction 
of the Singer building, if made into three- 
quarter-inch wire cable, would reach from 
New York to Buenos Ayres, a distance of 
7100 miles. 

The terra cotta floor blocks in the build- 
ing, if spread out on a plane, would cover 
8.36 acres. Placed end to end, they would 
extend ninety-seven miles, or from New 
York to Philadelphia. It contains 5,033,800 
bricks, and these, laid end to end, would 
reach 635 miles, from New York to Detroit. 
They would pave a footpath twelve inches 
wide from New York to Boston.* 

This modern skyscraper contains 101 tons 
of sheet copper, enough to cover 4.64 acres. 
The copper, combined with the statuary 
bronze in the building would yield 46,208,- 
000 cents, or $462,080. 

If the concrete in the foundation of the 
building were all loaded on two-horse trucks 
it would make a continuous line of 10,180 
trucks, thirty-eight miles long, or twice the 
distance from the Singer building to Yon- 
kers. 

The steel in the building would make 125 
large type mogul locomotives : that is, a con- 
tinuous line of engines for a mile and a half. 
It would make a seventy-four-mile stretch 
of heaA^y modern track, rails, spikes and tie- 
pieces. Made into elevator cables, it would 
extend 7100 miles, and if the total lengths 
of all the strands of wire in the cables were 
put together they would cover an area of 
fifty acres. 

There are 13.3 miles of picture molding 
in the l)uilding. If all the moldings for the 
doors, pictures and windows were put in a 
straight line they would reach sixty miles. 

More than 5541 tons of mortar were used 
in the masonry. This would make a path 
fourteen inches wide and one inch thick from 
New York to Washington, a distance of 240 
miles. About 197 tons of paint were used 
on the various surfaces. This would cover 
a board fence six feet high from New York 
to Springfield, 126 miles, with one coat. 

There are 25.4 acres of wall area in the 
new skyscraper. It would make a line of 
l^laster twelve inches wide from New York 
to Boston. 

The glass in the Iniilding, 85,203 square 
feet, would make a continuous show window 
six feet high on one side of Broadway from 
Liberty to Thirty-fourth street. There are 
256,000 square feet of metal lath, or five 
and nine-tenths acres. To support those 
laths 49.1 miles of structural angle irons 
were required, together with 130 miles of 
tying wire and 110,000 bolts. 

There are 8.85 miles of elevator cables in 
the building, and nine fans capable of blow- 
ing 6,820,000 cubic feet of air an hour, which 
would make it possible for an ordinary 



sized town almost to generate its own tor- 
nado. 

The lighting system of the Singer build- 
ing represents a capacity of 278,800 candle- 
power. The boilers of the building, to gen- 
erate light, heat, power, etc., must yearly 
generate 150,000,000 pounds of steam. This 
will take 18,000,000 gallons of water and 
8000 tons of coal. 

The tower elevator cars travel about 600 
feet a minute. With the building fairly well 
filled the cars will travel 310 miles daily and 
make a yearly total of 98,270 miles, or about 
four times the distance around the earth. 
The length of the highest elevator shaft is 
546 feet. — Industrial World. 



CAPE TO CAIRO RAILWAY. 



Two more steps have recently been taken 
toward the realization of the late Cecil 
Rhodes' "substantial dream" of a Cape to 
Cairo railway. It is announced that this 
month Messrs. Pauling & Co. will start 
work on the construction of a 400-mile ex- 
tension northward from Broken Hill. At 
the other end of the "gap" is Halfaya, 1,340 
miles south of Cairo and only separated 
from Khartoum by the Blue Nile, across 
which a new railway and road bridge is 
now in course of construction by the Sou- 
dan Government. As soon as the Soudan 
Government railway administration is able 
to utilize this temporary bridge for the pas- 
sage of its goods trains it intends to make 
a start with the southward extensions of 
its system, and rail head will be established 
at Seunar, a city of the Eastern Soudan on 
the Blue Nile, 160 miles south-southeast of 
Khartoum. From Seunar it is also intended 
to construct a branch line in a westerly 
direction, doubling back at almost a right 
angle to El Obeid, the capital of Kordofan. 
This railway will cross the White Nile near 
the village of Goz Albu Guma, about 1^2 
miles south of Khartoum, and the contract 
for the construction of the road and rail 
bridge at this point has been awarded to the 
same firm which built the viaduct over the 
Zambesi at Victoria Falls, the Cleveland 
Bridge and Engineering Company. It is a 
curious coincidence that these distant but 
connecting links are being built by the same 
firm of British contractors and the erection 
supervised and carried out by the same resi- 
dent engineer. 

It was originally intended that the Cape 
to Cairo Railway line would pass from 
Broken Hill northeastward through north- 
east Rhodesia, but the plan has been 
changed so that it will run almost due north 
from Broken Hill to the border of the 
Congo State, then northwestward to Star 
of Congo mine. The 400-mile extension will 
reach that point and, as stated above, will be 
commenced at once, and will be of standard 
gauge. 

The construction of the line from Broken 
Hill to the border of the Congo State will 
be carried out by a company known as 
"Rhodesia Katanga Junction Railway and 
Mineral Company (Limited)," and the line 
from the frontier to the Star of the Congo 
mine will be built by the Compagnie du 
Chemin de Fer du Katanga. — Consular Re- 
port. 



Demand the Hatters' label when buying a 
hat. 



SOUTH AFRICAN UNION. 



By a referendum vote of three to one Na- 
tal has declared in favor of joining the South 
.\frican union. This clears the way for the 
complete federation of the colonies of Trans- 
vaal, Cape Colony, the Orange River Colony 
and Natal. The British element is dominant 
in Natal, and there has been antagonism to 
union because of the fear that the confeder- 
ation would be controlled by the Boers. The 
vote indicates that larger ideas have gained 
the day and that the greater good of all has 
been the determining factor. 

When comparatively recent history is re- 
called the fear of the Boers seems natural. 
But there has been a rapid change of feel- 
ing in South Africa. The Englishman who 
was inclined to be suspicious of the former 
enemy has found him ready to accept the 
new conditions of life and to go forward 
under them to contentment and prosperity. 
As a result suspicion has been disarmed, and 
those who once opposed union as objection- 
a1)le from the point of view of the English- 
man have come out boldly in favor of it. 

The desirability of simplifying adminis- 
tration has been an important consideration. 
To govern about 1,000,000 white people there 
have been four Governors, four Parliaments 
and four sets of machinery. The cost of 
such administration has been excessive. The 
economic aspect has influenced many in fa- 
\or of the simpler plan of a single govern- 
ment for all. 

Along with the distinct administration 
there has been noticed a tendency toward 
separation. This has afifected commercial re- 
lationships and retarded internal develop- 
ment. Where a free interchange of com- 
modities was desirable the separate govern- 
ment plan has worked in favor of discrimina- 
tions and trade barriers whose ultimate ef- 
fects were seen to be disastrous to the com- 
mon interests of all. 

The wisdom of a common polic}' toward 
the natives has been apparent. The advan- 
tages of combined efifort in the fight against 
the locust, the tick, and other foes of the 
farmer have appealed to many. The desire 
to break down as rapidly as possible the 
barriers erected by racial differences has 
l)een influential. 

Good sense has won the day. For the 
present the vexed question of language has 
been settled on the bi-lingual basis. Eng- 
lish and Dutch will be used, time being al- 
lowed for the determination of precedence in 
accordance with the law of the survival of 
the fittest. Other adjustments have been 
made in generous spirit. All indications 
l)oint to a happy issue of troubles in South 
Africa and to a successful future thcre.^ 
Chicago Tribune. 



.\ combination of shipowners has been 
formed at Blagoveshensk, Siberia, and has 
l)urchased all the wharves, godowns, and 
barges of the Amur Steamship Company, 
and now owns a fleet of 18 steamers and 
31 barges, and they expect to control the 
navigation of the central and lower ,\mur. 



The Chinese Board of Communication is 
negotiating the taking over of the China 
Merchants' Steam Navigation Company. 
This step is reported to be in connection 
with ])reparations for creating a modern 
navy. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Taylor's Nautical School 



According to newspaper reports. 
Abdul Hamid, the deposed Sultan of 
Turkey, is writing a history of his 
reign. 

A dispatch from Tiflis says that 1000 
Persian brigands are massed on the 
frontier and are menacing the Rus- 
sian guards. Re-enforcements have 
been hurriedly sent. 

The Austrian consulate at Saltillo. 
Mex., was attacked by a mob and 
-other political disturbances occurred 
in connection with the Independence 
Day celebration there. 

Count Tolstoi, who celebrated his 
eighty-first birthday recently, went to 
Moscow on September 17 for the first 
time in several years. He appeared 
to be in vigorous hejilth. 

A dispatch from Portici, on the 
Bay of Naples, to the Giornale d'ltala, 
says that Vesuvius is active again. 
Guides report rumblings followed by 
slight seismic shocks. 

Walter S. Bond of New York ha.s 
climbed Mont Blanc from Chamouni 
in eight hours. He thus breaks the 
record of nine and a half hours, made 
by Morehead, an Englishman, in 1865. 
Lord Northcliffe, owner of the Lon- 
don Times, predicts war between Ger- 
many and Great Britain. He says 
that in the Krupp gun works alone 
100,000 men are working night and 
day and on Sundays preparing for 
war. 

A treaty conchu'ed at Rio Janeiro 
on September 8 between the repre- 
sentatives of Brazil and Peru has put 
an end to the frontier dispute be- 
tween these countries in the Amazon. 
Each country retains its actual pos- 
sessions in the Amazon. 

A temperance campaign which 
promises to have a marked effect on 
the consumption of alcohol in Ger- 
many has been begun as the result 
of a resolution adopted at the Social- 
ist convention in Leipsic on Septem- 
ber 16. 

A dispatch received at St. Peters- 
burg from Teheran, Persia, says the 
pretender to the Persian throne, Ab- 
dul Hussein, has appeared at Luristan 
and proclaimed himself Shah. He is 
receiving the support of the local 
population. 

The Irish Land bill passed the 
British House of Commons on Sep- 
tember 17 by a vote of 174 to 51. 
The House of Lords probably will 
pass the measure after modifying the 
clause regarding compulsory acquisi- 
tion of lands. 

A dispatch to the London Daily 
Telegraph from Copenhagen says that 
a sensation has been caused in Sweden 
by the decision of the Cabinet to 
present a bill to Parliament to abolish 
all order of rank and grades of 
precedence except among the officers 
of the army and navy. 

The National Egyptian Congress in 
session at Geneva on September 14 
renewed its protest against the further 
"wicked occupation of the country" 
by Great Britain. The congress se- 
lected September 14, the twenty- 
seventh anniversary j)f the entry of 
the British troops into Cairo, to voice 
its protest. 

The High Court of St. Petersburg 
has rejected the appeal of the victims 
of the so-called "Republican" process 
held before the Military Tribunal in 
Tcigri, lasting from May 22 to July 
3. This body found the defendants 
guilty and sentenced them immediate- 
ly, the leaders being condemned to 
death. 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
find best equipped private Nautical School In 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
American and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inntions. Warrant officers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commls- 
•sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
ing the United States Naval Academy and 
American Mercliant Marine. 

Personal instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M. A.. Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
etc. 



ROOS BROS. 

Biggest Values in Men*s Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Hats 

50 YEARS INHbUSINESS 

ROOS BROS. 

MARKET STREET San Francisco 




Named shoes are frequently made In Non- 
Union factories. 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what Its name, unless It bears a 
plain and readable Impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP are 
always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence of 
the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Relatives are inquiring for the fol- 
lowing missing sailors: Alf. Carter 
of Wellesley Street, Auckland, New 
Zealand. John Cruickshank, late mate 
of Br. bark "Kilmeny," was in St. 
Mary's Hospital last August. Charles 
Seymour; made trip in transport S. S. 
"Sherman" in January, 1907. Was at 
Vancouver 1907. Address Seamen's 
Institute, 242 Stcuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," th« "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, - Eureka, Cal. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by tlie Seattle 
Postofllce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 

period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 

Allf-n. W. J. T.,auritsen. Hans 

Anderson, Alf. Larsen, Kristian 

Andorson, Andrew I>aive, V. 

Anderson. Carl P. Linder. Victor 

Ankerstrom, C. Uind, Hjilmar E. 

Anker, C Uorin. Kristian 

Berentsen. R. Matliison, Nils 

Benson, E. Cartinson, Christ. 

Bianca, F. Machado. E. 

Bird. Chr. Malmberg, A. C. 

Bray. A. E. Magnusen, E. W. 

Brauer, Geo. Martinsohn, A. 

Brown, Jim McMahon. J. 

Burkland. .John Mehupt, Jas. 

Carlson. Ole Mikkelsen. Kristian 

Carlson, Uudwik Miller, Adolf 

Carlson, Thure Molver. Olaf 

Carnell. Geo. B. More. A. O. 
Christofferson, Emil Morrison, J. 

Christensen. Vlggo Monoghan. J. 

Chapman. F. G. Moore, James 

Conee. A. Nagel. A. 

Coughlan, Chas. Nelsen. M. 

Daly, John Ness. Carl 

Daniels. C. Nielsen, Wilhelm 

Dreifelt, Albert Nielsen, B. P. 

Poll, Herman Nielsen, Waldemar 

Egelkoff, Kri-d Olson, Anton 

Klliot, W. V. Olsson, Just 

Eliasen, E. Olsen, O. A. -S72 

Englierg. Oscar Olason. A. 

Ernst. George Olsson, Johan 

Erick, Mr. Olsen, Andrew 

Erikson. Alton Olson, Charles 

Erickson. Axel R. Orten, Sigurd 

Espy, Orville Owens. J. ir. 

Flynn. Maurice Peters, J. 

I'jelstad. K. M. Pettersen. Sigurd 

Franzell, Arthur Pernln, Clir. 

Frodriksen. B. D. Pertells, W. 

Geklor. Fritz Penny, W. 

Gonyt'tte, Joseph Petersen. P. 

Gustafson, Karl O. Price, Bruce 
Hansen, H. C. -1998 Rasmussen, A. N. 

Haga, A. Andersen Rasmussen, R. -525 

Hansc-n, T. S. Reinman. Karl 

Haug, H. H. Rider. Arthur 

Hansen. H. Johan Rider, David 

Hansen. H. K. Rugland. Ole 

Harris, Jos. E. Sandstrom. F. 

Itediund, Arvid Sanchez, F. 

Holhvood, Mr. Sandstrom. O. H. 

Hewitt, 1". Saalenes, T. J. 

Jsensen, Johannes Samuclson, Harold 

-16S4 Schmak, M, 

Jt-nsen, Louis Scherlen, Robert 

Jcrsch, W. Schultz. Ernest 

Jorgensen, J. A. Sckubber. H. 

.locketyn, J. Skoog, August 
Jolmson, C. F. -1566 Soderlund. J. F. 

John.son, Eric Solly, Ed. 

Jolmson, P. K. J. Sorensen, Hans 

Johnson, Chas. Stoff. K. 

Jolmson, C. J. Syvertsen, Ole 

.Johnsen, Hans Swanson, J. 

Joliansen. Knut Sunby. A. E. 

Johansen, Alf. Tcllofson. Peder 

Johanson. Victor Thompson, T. 

Johnson, Emil Thorn. Arvid 

Klintberg, Chas, Torgersen, Ludvig 

Kleini'. Carl Tockelyn, T. 

Klausen. Karl Victorsen. Ernest M. 

Klingenberg. John Warren. Louis 

Kristiansen. Louis Wallace, A. 

Kri.stofforsen. Emil Walter. E. R. A. 

Kristiansen, Nils Wennerke, A. 

Lathonen, Frank Wifstrand. C. T. 

Larsen. H. C. M. Worm, Albert 
Latz. Konstant 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEV i. YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers In Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HE LIVES UP TO HIS NAME 

WHO 

Why Boss the Boss Tailor 



HERMAN SCHULZE. 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET. COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 




SC ANDI A HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



UE EMPLOYS ONLY FUiST- 
CLASS UNION HELP 
NUF CED. 

Boss the Tailor 

1120 IMARKET ST. 

Opposite Seventh San Francisco 



GOOD 


FOR A 

CUP OF 


COFFEE 


OR A 


SQUARE MEAL 




TRY 




EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEK, Prop. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



John Widell, who has been on the 
Pacific Coast and in Alaska for 
about 18 years, is inquired for by his 
nephew, Bernt Valdemar Blomquist, 
Box 65, Seattle, Wash. 

Oswald Schnaubelt, a native of 
Schneidemuchl, Germany, born 1883, 
last heard of 1903, is inquired for by 
his mother. Address Mrs. M. Schnau- 
belt, Neu Beelitz, near Bromberg, 
Germany. 

William McT-ean, a native of Ar- 
broath, Scotland, supposed to be sail- 
ing on the Pacific Coast, and a mem- 
ber of the Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, is inquired for by his brother, 
Murdo, ship Loudenhill, Tacoma, 
Wash. 

The five sailors who left the schoon- 
er A. J. West at Honolulu, on March 
30, 1908, are requested to communicate 
with the Secretary of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific. The libel against 
the A. J. West has been adversely de- 
cided by the Federal Court at Hono- 
lulu. 

MARSHFIELD, OR. 

UNION CIGAR STORE 

383 FRONT ST. 

MARSHFIELD, OREGON 

Dealers in 

, CIGARS AND TOBACCO, CANDY, 
NUTS. ETC. 
Longshoremen and Sailors' Headquarters 
HERMAN CORDES. Prop. 
Phone 97-L 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, 


WASH. 


BURNETT 


BROS. 


JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 


WATCHES AND 

Cor. of HERON 

ABERDEEN, 


JEWELRY 

& G STS. 

WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



TACOMA, WASH. 



116 South 



'G" Street, 
Aberdeen, 



Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &t CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins. 

Blanltets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 




TACOMA, WASH 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 



"THE WHITE HOUSE" 

ALEXANDER & McBRIDE 

403 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
75c; Hickory Shirts, BOc. 



Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Enn" Overalls 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clotfaing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

■ PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Waah. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 

around the corner from the Union OfHce. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 
PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 
Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Waah. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing la our motto. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

11 Coleman Dock, SEATTLE, Wash. 

Offlce Phone, Ind. 1713. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed in the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. v 

494 ARCADE BUILDING 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 

Dry Qooda, Clothing, Boots and Shoea, 

Hata and Capa, Genta' Furnlah- 

Inga and Sallora' Outfita. 

316 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Johan Pommer, a native of Russia, 
aged about 38, supposed to be some- 
where in a Pacific Coast State, is in- 
quired for by Alex Pommer, Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, 44-45 East street, 
San Francisco. 



R. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squlre-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Waah. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Wilhelm Drews, born at Breiten- 
felde, Germany, who was first mate 
on the American schooner "Philip- 
pine" in 1906 at Aberdeen, is inquired 
for by the German Consul, San Fran- 
cisco. 






It is announced that President Taft 
will appoint George R. Colton, of the 
District of Columbia, as Governor of 
Porto Rico. 

President Taft started from Bever- 
ly, Mass., on September 15, on a tour 
of the West, including a visit to the 
Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition. 

Robert S. Lovett was elected on 
September 13 to succeed the late Ed- 
ward H. Harriman as head of the 
Union Pacific Railroad executive com- 
mittee. 

The will of Edward H. Harriman, 
the deceased railroad magnate, be- 
queaths all his property to the widow, 
amounting to between $75,000,000 and 
$100,000,000. 

Claims for $11,500,000 for extra 
work done in the construction of the 
present subway from King's Bridge to 
Brooklyn, are pending against the 
city of New York. 

Postmaster-General Hitchcock on 
September 13 signed an order in- 
creasing the fee for registration of 
mail from 8 to 10 cents, to take efifect 
November 1, 1909. 

Lord Charles Beresford, in an ad- 
dress at New York on September 17, 
declared his belief that a coalition of 
the English-speaking nations would 
preserve the peace of the world. 

Spencer F. Eddy of Chicago has 
sent in his resignation from the Dip- 
lomatic Corps to President Taft. 
Eddy is at present United States Min- 
ister to Roumania and Servia. 

William Lloyd Garrison, son of the 
great Abolitionist and widely known 
as a publicist and reformer, died at 
Lexington, Mass., on September 12, 
aged 71 years. 

John D. Spreckels, Lyman J. Gage 
and U. S. Grant, Jr., are head of a 
company capitalized at $1,000,000 to 
promote a world's fair in 1915 to cele- 
brate the opening of the Panama 
Canal. 

L. H. Glavis, chief of the field di- 
vision of the General Land Office, 
with headquarters at Seattle, was dis- 
missed from the service on Septem- 
ber 16 by telegraph by Secretary of 
the Interior Ballinger. Glavis is 
charged with attacking the integrity 
of his superior officer. 

A British subject, William G. Ir- 
win, now owns the entire island of 
Lanai of the Territory of Hawaii, ac- 
cording to a deed which has just 
been filed in the office of the Regis- 
trar of Conveyances at Honolulu. 
Lanai lias an area of 139 square miles, 
86,000 acres, and a population of 
about 600, chiefly laborers. 

Tlie Bagley Tobacco Company an- 
nounces that it has resumed the man- 
ufacture of its tobaccos, after four 
weeks' cessation caused by damage 
due to fire in one of its factories at 
Detroit, Mich. The company has 
also given a contract for the con- 
struction of a new factory at Detroit, 
whicli will be the most complete of 
its kind in the country. 

According to the Commissioner of 
hnmigration at Ellis Island, N. Y., 
580,616 immigrants landed at that 
port in the year ended June 30. Of 
these 564,473 came from Europe, 6,831 
from Asia, and the balance from the 
West Indies, South America, etc. Of 
the European immigrants the bulk 
consisted of Italians (166,129), Rus- 
sians (98,834), Hungarians (84,014), 
Austrians (74,645), British (50,286), 
and Germans (22,908). 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The War Department has issued 
orders that no tows be permitted on 
the Hudson River between September 
24 and October 10, on account of the 
Hudson-Fulton celebration. 

Captain G. W. Waltemar, of. the 
schooner Issac T. Campbell, which 
was wrecked in the Gulf of Mexico on 
August 26. arrived at New York on 
September 10 on tlie Mallory liner 
Brazos. 

The three-masted schooner John 
Proctor went ashore off Cape Hen- 
lopen on September 13, and is slowly 
breaking up. The crew landed in the 
boats. The schooner probablj' will be 
a total loss. 

Tlie American schooner Henry 
Crosby arrived at Mobile, Ala., on 
September 12, dismasted and without 
provisions or water. She was wrecked 
in the hurricane of August 24 off 
Grand Cayman Island. 

Captain Netiierton of the British 
steamship Comedian, at Galveston, 
Tex., on September 14, reported that 
three strong streams of oil are bub- 
bling on the surface of the Gulf of 
Mexico, 160 miles south of Galveston. 

Statistics compiled by Navy Pay- 
master Jere Maupin show that 7700 
men are saving and 6300 arc helping 
to support their families, almost 
$2,000,000 being assigned for the 
former purpose and $1,500,000 for the 
latter. 

The 26.000-ton battleship to be built 
l)y the New York Shipbuilding Com- 
pany will be known as the Arkansas, 
and that by William Cramp's Sons & 
Company, as the Wyoming. The con- 
tracts for these ships were let re- 
cently. 

.\ contract for the building of two 
steel steamships to run in the coal- 
carrying trade between Charlotte, N. 
Y., and Montreal, has been awarded 
to the Detroit Shipbuilding Conijiany 
by the George Hall Company, of Og- 
densburg, N. Y. 

The Cunard liner Mauretania broke 
all transatlantic records on Septem- 
ber 9 by making the passage between 
Queenstown and New York in 4 days 
1 1 hours and 35 minutes, beating the 
record of the I.usitania by seven 
minutes. 

.\ challenge for an international 
yacht race for the America's Cup in 
.•\ugust. 1910, is expected to reach the 
New York Yacht Club next month 
from Sir Thomas Lipton. It will come 
through either the Royal Ulster Yacht 
Club or the Royal Irish Yacht Club, 
to both of which Sir Thomas belongs. 

The Secretary of the Navy on Sep- 
tember 10 recommended to Secretary 
MacVcagh of the Treasury Depart- 
ment that life-saving medals be 
awarded to Roy W. Akers, coxswain. 
United States cruiser Albany, and 
Thomas McDonald, gunner's male on 
the Virginia. Secretary Meyer per- 
sonally commended Martin F. Cur- 
ran, gunner's mate of the Montana, 
for gallantry in jumping overboard to 
rescue a shipmate. 

A recent dispatch from New Or- 
leans announces what appears to be 
another assured New Orleans to Phil- 
adelphia steamship line. The new 
line will probablj' be called the Phoe- 
nix Steamship Company, and is the 
outgrowth of the Joseph Company's 
failure to get satisfactory terms from 
either the Southern Pacific or the 
Philadelphia and Gulf lines for the 
carrying of iron from New Orleans 
to Eastern ports. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Cotters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
l-'nion Office are advertised for tliree 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg. Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abel. Paul 
Abbors. Arne 
Adamsson, John 
Adolf, Chas. 
Adamsen. Oscar 
Aga, Johan 
Ahem. Daniel 
Akerman, W. 
Akerson, Oias. A. 
Albright. Emil 
Allen, W. J. 
Alonzo, Julius 
Andersen, Chr. 
Andersen, -lo(>2 
Andersen, Sam 

Baardsen, Tellef 
Bakman, Karl 
Bartels, Herman 
Barrinto, J. 
Bastion, -12S2 
Bauer, Frank 
Beausang, K. 
Beck, Mr. 
Beckman. Rudolph 
Bensen, B. 
Berentsen, K. 
Berntsson, M. 
Bertilsen-1083 
Birde, Chr. 
Birkelund, R. 
Bjorkholm, G. A. 
BJorkman, C. H. 

Callaway, Edw. 
Carisun, John A. 
Carlson, Krnest 
Carlson, Oscar 
Carlson, Custav 
Carlsson, E. G. 
Carlsson-776 
Carnaglian, Mr. 
Cairick, J as. B. 
Ceelau, John 
cnaler, B. 

Uahl, Olaf 
Liahl, Jonn B. 
uay, Harry 
Ue Baere, Harry 
Ui-xon, John 

Kdelman, G. 
Kklund, Harry 
Kliasen, E. 
KIlis, Jack 
hJngelgrecn, L. 
Kngberg, Oskar Beo 
Kngblom, Albert 

Falkner, John 
Fcoley, 1 homas 
Flem, Knut 
Garden, Chris. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Geiger, Joe 
Gem, Adam C. 
German, R. 
Gibbs, Harry U. 
Gottlieb, Sam 
Grawert, Joe 
Green, Chas. 

ilaak. UeinholU 
Hallstrom, J. K. 
xialvorsen, .^.nton 
italvorsen, \Vm. 
Halvorsen, Aiilton 
Hamm, Edward 
Hansen, -Uli? 
llaugen. Bars 
Hansen, -lli*5 
Hansen, -IBas 
Hansen, Mkolai 
Hansen, Harold O. 
Hansen-1576 
Hansen, Geo. 
Hansen, H. T. 
Hansen, Jens M. 
Hansen, Theo. 
Hansen. Markus H. 
Hanson, Frank 
Hanssen, -l»to? 
Ingeman, -132 
Irwin. Robert 
Iversen, Tom 



Jacobson, -1304 


Jackobsen-1786 


J ago, K. 




Jensen, 


J. K. 


Jansen, 


-i»a4 


Jensen, 


Chas. 


Jensen, 


-1U76 


Jensen, 


Ernst 


Jensen, 


Kris 


Jenson. 


T. C. 


Jolmsen 


-12S1 


Johnsen 


Mathias 


Jolmson 


Geo. 


Johnson 


Hilmer 


Johnson 


Richard 


Johnson 


John E. 


Johnson 


-1800 


Johnson 


Carl 



Kaasik, August 
Kaho, H. 
Kane, G. 
Karlson. Aug. 
Karlgren-644 
Karsberg, C. 
Kaufhold. Ed. 
Kavall, John 
Keelan, J. 
Kellgren, J. A. 
Kenniston, Frank 
Kerr, Wm. 
Laason, -1790 
Laason, -1370 
Laason, M. 
Lahr. Otto 
Lane. Leonard 
Lang. Gustaf 
Langvardt, Chr. 
Langdon, Chas. 
Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, Sofus 
Larsen-1288 
Larsen, Peter 



Andersen, -1124 
Andersen, -1541 
Andersen, -1560 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Ned 
Anderson, Jolm 
Andersson. Emil 
Andersson, -1246 
Apps, P. 

Aronsen, Halfdan 
Aunbaun, A. 
Austin, Andrew 
Axelsen. Ax«l 
Aylward, Jas. 

Black. Victor 
Boisen, Jorgen 
Boyesson, John 
Brams, Carl S. 
Brander, Wm. Me. 
Brandt, -1725 
Bra.v, John K. 
Bray, Edward 
Brinton, Geo. 
Bro.x, Harry 
Brulm. Paul 
Buaas. Thomas 
Bult. Ernest 
Bung, B. 
Burer, Frank 
Bustamante. Jose 

Chotard, Emilien 
Chnstensen, -1126 
Christiansen, J. F. 
Christensen, E. H. 
Christopiier, Geo. 
Chrislolfersen-1288 
Chisholm, RT 
Classon, John 
Claus, C. 
Curran, Nicholas 

Dories, H. 
Draear. Krtgardo 
Dunn, C. W. 
Duncan, G. M. 

Erdman, B. J. 
Ericson, (J. VV. 
Erieksen, Gerhard 
Erlkson, P. E. 
Erlksen, Leonard 
Espensen, E. N. 

Fox, T. B. 

Frederiksen, B. 
Fuehs, J. 
Green, H. R. 
Gron, Edward 
Gronlioim, -872 
Gronman, H. R. 
Grossl-766 
Gunnarson, Jolm 
Gunderson, Oie 
Gundersen, Martin 
Gustafsson, G. B. 

Harmening, F. 
Heescne, H. 
Hegener, Reinhold 
Hein, M. 
Heinz, Jack 
Heikklla, P. 
Heller. O. 
Helmer, F. II. 
Hendriksen, Adolf 
Henriksen, -1737 
Henriksen, Adolf G. 
Herniansen, -1622 
Hetman, Walter 
Hewston, James 
Hilke, Carl 
Hoglund, Frank 
Holmslrom, K. A. 
Hoist, Richard 
Hultberg, E. 
Hutchinson, Mr. 
Iversen, Fred 
Iversen, Carl 

Johnson-1669 
Johnsson, !■ rank 
Joliansen, -1420 
Johansen, -2004 
Johansen, C. H. 
Johansen, -1705 
.lohanson, -880 
Johanson, -1082 
Johanson, -1420 
Johanson, -1734 
Johansson, Theo. 
Johansson, Gust 
Johansson, Oscar 
Johannessen, John 
Johannessen, -1.S63 
Jorgensen, Jakob 
Jurgensen, Jakob 

Keskula. John 
Kjellen, Chas. 
Klaesson, Axel 
Knudsen, Lars 
Knudsen. Lauritz 
Koening, D. 
Kolter, L. 
Kopats, Oscar 
Krlstiansen, Nils 
Kristoftersen, -1288 
Kuehme, W. 

I>aine, Nicholas 
Laine, Wm. 
Lang- 89 
Langben, Chas. 
Larson, L. 
Larson, J. 
Larsson. Efraim 
Lass, -1406 
Lauretsen, Ole 
Lehto, Alex. 
Leithoft. Carl 
Linde, O. B. 



Lindberg, John 
Lindholm-610 
Lindroos, Oscar 
Lommos, Henri 

Made, L. W. 
Madsen, Thorolf 
Madsen, -952 
Malm, Axel 
Malmberg, Elis 
Margnusson, E. W. 
Martin, Geo. 
Malliiesen, L. Niels 
Mathisen, I. H. 
M:itlnesen, Ing. 
Matisen, N. 
Matson. Ralph 
Mattson, H. A. 
Mattson, K. J. 
Mattson, Alex 
Mi-Embers. R. 
McKeown, Thos. 

Naber, M. 
Nauman, Alf. 
Nelson, C. M. 
Nelsen, Andrew 
Nester, W'ilson C. 
Nielsen, -950 
Nielsen, Olaf 
Nielsen, -918 
Nilsen, Anders 



Lundgren, -1295 
L\mdlioln), K. A. 
lAUKlberg, John 

Mehent, Joe 
Melart, Rolf 
Melen, Edwin 
Meiin, -1712 
Mersman, A. 
Mesak, Edw. 
Mikkelsen, A. S. 
Miller, Wm. 
Moller, L. 
MoUer, Nils 
Moore. Patrick 
Morken, Kristian 
Muller, Otto 
MuUer, Geo. 
Mullin, Joseph 
Munze, Dick 

Nilsen, -346 
Nilson, Karl J. 
Nllssen, Carl Johan 
Nilsson. Edw. 
Nilsson, -935 
Nilsson. Carl F. 
Nordstrom, Gus 
Norvik. Morten 
Nyquist. Wm. 



O'Daly, John 


Olsen, M. 


Getjen. Fred 


Olsen, Eugen M. 


t)lau.sen. Krist 


Olsen, Marinus 


Olausen, Ellas 


Olsen, -499 


Olesen, Marinus 


Olson, -S34 


Olsen, Amund 


Olsson, Karl 


Olson. P. J. 


Ommundsen, H. 


Olsen. Olai 


Opaerbeck. E. 


Olsen. Gust. 


Osterdahl, Chas. 


Olsen, Soren 


Osol, Theo 



Palamo. M. G. 
Palizek, Lorenz 
Prdersen, Alf. 
IVdersen, N. B. 
I'cderscn, -888 
Pedersen, S. Rein- 

liold 
Pedersen, C. E. 
Pedersen, Olav 
Pedersen, Olaf A. 
I'eclorsen, -1086 
Pedersen, -1110 
Penny, Matthew 
Persson, Hjalmar 
Peterson, Henry 
Peterson, Peter 

Rasmussen, Emil 
Rasmussen, Jens P. 
Kasiuuss«n, -525 
Rasmuson, A. 
Ravall, John 
Iteichelt. H. A. 
Ilcutern, Axel 
Rigoult, Bert 
Rintzo, John 

Saar, Hans 
rfabel, F. 
Sampson, Carl 
Samsing, Carl 
Sand. B. -2113 
Sandberg, N. A. 
Sandstrom. O. H. 
riander, Chas. 
Sauer, Emil 
Saul, Th. A. 
Schevig, A. B. 
Sihlachte, Alf. 
Sehluter, Paul 
Schmidt, Fritz 
Schmitt, Geo. 
Scholl, Karl 
Scholtens. Ben 
Schrodt, Alf. 
Schroder. F. A. 
Sclmlz. Gust. E. 
Schultz, Axel 
Schutz, Ludvig 
Scott, Ed. 
Silander, Gus. 
Seiiiberg, John 
Sexon. ('has. 
Sie. John 
Slebert. Harry 
Siem, C. 
Siegurd. J. I. 

Teigland. Karl 
'I'crente. M. 
Tliomas, Jos. W. 
Thorsen-615 
Thorsen-689 
Thorn, Edmund 
Thorn. Arvld 
Tillman, A. 
Tillman, Chas. 

L'dbye, Harold 
Uhdermann, P. 

Valentine, Geo. 
Valeur, Marius 
Velure-218 
Verbrugge, D. W. 
Vega, F. A. 
Vickers, John 

Wahl. Robert 
Walilstrom. Alb. 
Wallin. John 
\'i"altland. John 
Wang. Julius 
Watson, A. J. 
We.slhiifer. H. 
Westlund, Wm. 
Wetzel, Curt 
Wetland, John 
Weyman, Emil 

Zimmerman, F. 



PACKAGES. 
Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Andersson, Vlcktor Kolstad, Anton 

Atkinson. Samuel Oetjcn, Fred 

Holmstrom. Carl A. Pietila. -1338 

Jensen, -1944 Rutbberg, E. 

Johnson. Chas. Selander. Gust 

Johannessen, -18G3 Torklldson, Marius 
Kaasik. A. 



Petersen, Henning 
Petersen, -782 
I'etersen, -1019 
Petersen, Karl O. 
I'eterson, -499 
Pettersen. O. T. 
Pettersson. -1208 
Pettersson-1186 
I'etlerson. Oscar 
Pietila, T. 
Plenter, Wm. 
Poder, J. 
Pothien, S. 
I'rcniU. L. 
Purnhagen, Ludv. 

Roalsen, F. E. 
Kobsham, Jens W. 
Rokov. Steffan 
Rommel. Andrew 
Rosenberg, Frans A. 
Rost. K. G. 
Rotlov, St. 
Ryits, A. 

Sievers, Herman 
Silfoerlierg, Harold 
Sllvenlus, W. R. 
Simpson, L. C. 
Skagnian, W. A. 
Smith, Fred 
Smith, -64S 
Smith, Jas. B. 
Sinder, Victor 
Soderlund, A. 
Soland. Hans 
Solberg, T. 
Sorensen, A. 
Southeriand, A. 
Stugeland. P. 
Steen. H. 1>. 
Steen, llilmar 
Stein, John 
Stolt, A. J. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Suominen, N. 
Svansson, -913 
Svendsen, Otto 
Rwensson, Martin 
Swansson. Emil 
Svane, Albert 
Svensson-1795 
Svensson-1795 
Svensson-1932 
Sorensen, S. M. 

Tofte. H. 
Tollefsen. Aug. 
Tollefsen. Andreas 
Torkelsen, Marinus 
Torvik, Olaf 
Trenton, i>ouis 
Tupitz, C. 
'I'virner, Ted 

Utves, K. L. 

Vinje. Hllmar 

Vogel-214 

von den Steene, J. 

Vongehr. Ewald 

^'ortnlan, Wm. 

Wibbed, Louis W. 
Wiberg, E. A. 
Wikland, Chas. 
Wikstrom, O. 
Wilhelmsen, G. 
Will, C. 
Wilke. Wm. 
Willman, Frans-1020 
Wil.son, Fred 
Witt. August 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thomas Ayres Phillips, seaman, last 
heard of at 44 Minna street, San Fran- 
cisco, in 1902. Information wanted 
by British Consul, San Francisco. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Alfo, John 
Aeckerle. Ernst 
Anderson, Eskil 
Andersson, J. S. 
Berntsen, Julius 
Cox, H. E. 
Farm, J. B. 
Fostwedt, Carl 
Hultberg, Ernst 
Jensen, M. 
Jacobsen, Hans 
Johnson, C. A. 
Kearns. Edwin 
Koch, Carl 
Kjorsvik, Johan 
Kruger, Heinrlch 
Kent. Jack 
Klebingat, Fred 



Lindeman, A. 
Lorin, Crlstian 
Lynd. Chas. 
Moren, E. H. 
Olson, Olaf 
Olson, Otto 
PonnJ Anton 
Patterson, A. K. 
Roalsen, Fred 
Rasmussen, Andrew 
Scott, Ed. 
Sundholm. Freppa 
Schultz, Ernst 
Schmidt. Franz 
Schneider, William 

I. 
Sanchez, Frank 
Tamm, P. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Andenson, A. B. 
Anderson, Chas. -90' 
Belirf'nt. E. -1579 
Berndt, Hugo 
Buhmeister. John 
Cliapman, F. 
Charlson, M. 
Christoffersen. Emil 
Clausen, Nils 
Davey, Chas. 
Kkblom, Alfred 
Ekiund, Sven W. 
Eliasen. E. -396 
Kranzell. A. 
Frederickson, F. H. 

-529 
Hansen, Peto 
Harris, J. 



.Tacobsen, Olai 
Johanson, Emil 
l-arsen, Holger 
Lund, Peter 
McGuire. George 
Meyers, Clias. 
Nilsen, Oscar L. 
Nordenberg, John 
Olsen, Ole Johan 
Olsen, Slgvald 
Poppe, George 
Ratshet, August 
Saunders, J. 
Sovig, Chas. 
Swanson, Ben 
Turner, Alfred 
Turner, Richard 
W^ells, Leo L. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Alirens, W. 
Anderson, E. 
Alexander, K. 
Arnold, E. B. 
Anderson, P. T. 
Anderson, Harry 
Andersson, J. R. 
Anderson, -1534 
Abbors, A. 
Anderson, Sven 
Appelgreen, J. 
Buchtman. F. 
Billington, M. 
Birkelund, R. 
Busse. Ch. 
Brandt, N. 
Benson, Jon. 
Boosban. Ch. 
Carlson, K. J. 
Christensen, H. 
Cliristensen, C. E. 
Duval, Benoit 
Dories, H. 
Dowe. J. 
Domhoft, J. 
Drager, Otto 
Eichel, Ch. 
Eliassen. H. -599 
Eliassen. G. -1427 
Foeketyn, P. 
Furman, P. 
Frank, P. -499 
Goepper. Ch. 
Godley, Geo. 
Hansen. H. M. 
Haniger, A. J. 
Hammond. J. A. 
Hammerquist. A. J. 



Hope, Ole 
Jacobsen, -1786 
Johansson, 1700 
Johannessen, J. 
Jacobsen, Erland 
Jensen, L. 
Jalonen, J. 
Johannesen, Carsten 
Kristlansen, L. 
Kavander, W. 
Kosklnen. W. 
Long. L. 
Lerch, Paul 
Lewis, G. H. 
Lundgreen, C 
Matsson, Karl 
Morris, Oscar 
Mulley, James 
Maibom, H. 
Metge, G. 
Morden, J. 
Mlchalsen, J. 
Nielsen. V. -1000 
Oien, Thom. 
Orten, S. 
Pierson. A. 
Pederson, -896 
Petersen, C. 
Pedersen, James 
Rantanen, -770 
Rustanious, J. 
Quistgard, C. 
Swales, A. E. 
Swansen. Carl 
Syversen. H. 
Tuvfeson, Knut 
Taddlken, A. 
Vongher, Ed. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Ahrens, Walters 
Anderson, Sven 
BoyI, John 
Edwardsen-149 
Ellingsen, Edward 
Erkkila, Andrew 
Hillig, Albert 
Hultberg, John 
Johansen-2021 
Knudsen, T. 



Kirwin, Milton L. 
Melln, Edwin 
Klebingat, Fred 
McCallum, Chas. 
Mehrtens, Herman 
Peterson, Paul 
Samuelsen, Harold 
Stabell, Prank 
Walser, Ernest 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S LETTER LIST. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Letters at the Alaska Fishermen's of- 
fice will be advertised for six months 
only and will be returned to the Post 
OfBce at the expiration of seven months 
from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify the 
Secretary of the Alaska Fishermen's 
Union of their present address, in order 
to have their mail forwarded them. 



Arvldsson, A. M. 
Andersen, August 
Andreasen, Mogeno 
Anderson, A. O. 
Amtson, Albert 
Benson, John 
Bore, Carl Marius 
Carlson, Gust. 
Farrell. Henry D. 
Gulllksen, Gustav 
Hagen, George L. 
Hansen, Harry 
Johnson, Otto 
Johnson. George P. 
Kerr, W. 



Lofman, K. 
Morrison, A. 
Nicolaisen, Otto 
Nielsen, Carl Johan 
Nlkolaisen, Otto 
Olson, Ole 
Olson, Oskar 
Olson, Oluf 
Peterson, Prank V, 
Prescott, Fred 
Quay, Duncan R. 
Riise, Wm. 
Swanson, Chas. 
Thompson, A. 
Tonnesen, Jorgen 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' P^lrnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
Office: 
23 UNION AVENUE • - Portland, Or*. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

(Member u£ Ibe Assuciated Saviugs Banks oC 

San Fraiiciseo. ) 

526 California St., San FranciscOj Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,504,498.68 

Deposits, June 30, 1909 36,793,234.04 

Total Assets 39,435, 681. 3!s 

Remittance may be made by draft, postoffice 
or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s money orders, or coin by 
express. 

Office hours — 10 o'clock a.m. to 3 o'clock p.m., 
except Saturdays to 1^ o'clock m. and Saturday 
evenings from 7 o'clock p.m. to 8 o'clock p.m. 
for receipt of deposits only. 
Officers. 
President, N. Olilandt; first yice president, 
Daniel Meyer; secoiid vice prcside'it, Euiil Uniiic; 
casliier, A. H. R. Schmidt; assistant casliicr. 
William Herrmann; secretary, George T^M^tI,^■; 
assistant secretary, A. H. iVIuller; Goodfellow 
& Eells, general attorneys. 

Board of Directors. 
N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhardt, I. N. Walter. J. W. Vnn Borgon, 
F. Tillmann Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. Good- 
fellow. 

Mission Branch, 2.'572 Mission street, hctween 
Twenty-first and Twent.y-second streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of dennsito nnlv 

C. W. Heyer. Manager. 
Richmond District Branch, 432 Clement 
Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. 
For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
W. C. Heyer, Manager. 

HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 
Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
|2 to $2.50 per week. Electric bights. 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN. Manager. 

HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 weelt; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 

THE ADMIRAL 

146 EAST STREET 

100 large, nicely furnished rooms from 
35c to $2 per day, $2 to $5 per week. 

Electric Light and Call Bells, Hot and 
Cold Water, and Clean, Sanitary Bedding 
in Every Room. Electric Elevator Ser- 
vice. Free Baths. 

FERRY HOUSE 

CORNER EAST AND MISSION STS. 

Opposite Ferry Building 
EARTHQUAKE AND FIREPROOF 
The only house in the block between 
Market and Mission streets which was not 
injured by the great catastrophe of 1906. 
Nice Sunny Furnished Rooms from 25c 
to $2 per day; $1.50 to $6 per week; rooms 
for two persons $2.50 per week. 

BANNERS, REGALIA, ETC. 

Gold Bullion, Silk Embroidered and 
Painted Silk and Satin Banners; Hand 
Embroidered Silk American and Spe- 
cial Flags; Reversible and Ribbon 
Parade Badges; Silk and Satin Sashes 
and Regalia. All Union Made and 
Manufactured by 
THE WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 
860 Mission St. Phone Kearny 1966 

Patronize Home Industry. 

BXPRESSIINQ 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411 San Francisco 

JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
109STEUARTST., SanFrancisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 
BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CICAR CO.. NANUrACTURERS 

133 HARTFORD ST., S. F. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CAUFORIOA 

MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 

Branches: 624 Van Ness Avenue and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letters of Credit issued, payable in all parts of the world. 
Chas. F. Leege, Pres. W. A. Frederick, Vice-Pres. B. G. Tognazzi, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, "Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vice-Pres. 



SOMETHING NE"W 

THe Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

" ANTIDOTE, " 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
t a n t Advantages 
which can be found 
In No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking in. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first few smokes in 
an ordinary Pipe, 
the First Smoke in 
a n "ANTIDOTE" 
Is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 
protects the briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" is always 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) is • 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing it to pass off into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

RASSE:R BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET, S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Carl Bundessen, a native of Geeste- 
niunde, Germany, born 1883, is in- 
quired for by Alfred Wrede, 20 East 
street, San Francisco. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in 
(|uired for by his mother. Any one 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Portland, 
Ore. 

Henry Laurent, who has been sail- 
ing between San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 

John Johnson, a native of Norway, 
born September IS, 1858, at Blege- 
leidet Banile; last heard from in 1904 
living at 2.10 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, 165 Third 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



C. J. SWANSON 

Clothier & Furnisher for Gentlemen 
Up-to-Date Suits Made to Order 

$12 and Up 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed $1 
Alterations a Specialty 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 

Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform gold braids and gold wreaths of 
all descriptions. 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Waihiagton 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CAUFORNIA 



posso^ROAD 



OVERALLS 

Neustadter Bros. 

SANFRANCISCO NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



g-^ m jm ^'-^ w^r- m '^•r-^ O See that this label (in light blue) 

SIV10rCfcI<^;rrr: z.'^^' '^'^ " "'"' 

issued by Autfiorilyof tne Cigar MaKers' Intefnallonal Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

Uhii 'Sfllrfif;^, \M tin CIgwj cMiUiwd muils bw Imvb l»n made bya MBt-UaSS TOn<111311 
a tiLHUH or THE CICAB MAKERS 'INIUKATIOIWL UNION ol Amtita. in oijjni»ti<»i devoted to Dm a'' 
vjncemuil of the MOR«,l,(*ltRlMatiil IMauauAl WtllARt Of ni[ CaMl. •'---- 



Therefore we roconuMlld 



e CiQars to Jll smokers UirouQtiout the world 
' All htringements upon this Label wdlbe punished accof dmg to latM 



FAC 
' SIMILE 



^ ]1C (jh/k^ti^. PresuUnt, 
V CtffUc, 



>f America. 




The United Clerks' Union of Syd- 
ney, Aubtralia, lias decided to prc>s 
on the federation of the union with 
those of X'ictoria and Qtieenslaiid in 
order to take Federal ;icti>>ii. 

A labor fair will be held in San 
Francisco ditring Portola week, Octo- 
ber 19-23, for the purpose of raising 
funds to erect a Labor Temple. 

The American Federation of Musi- 
ci;ms ha.s won a victory by the ex- 
chisirrii from the Hudson-Fulton Cen- 
tenary parades in New York of all 
bands belonging to rival organiza- 
tions. 

The San Francisco Labor Council, 
on September 17, voted to expel the 
aiiti-McNuIty locals of the Electrical 
Workers' Union, in accordance with 
the request of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

President Taft, in an address at 
Chicago on Septeinber 16, repeated 
his ante-election declarations on the 
labor question and promised to rec- 
ommend to Congress the passage of 
legislation on the Injunction ques- 
tion. 

The second strike of workmen em- 
ployed at the plant of the Pressed 
Steel Car Company at McKee's 
Rocks, Pa., which was declared on 
September 13, was brought to an 
abrupt end on the 17th, when the men 
returned to work. 

Beginning on September 13, the 
mines of the Hazelton (Pa.) region 
will be operated on a schedule of four 
days a week. It has been two months 
since the collieries have been on such 
good time, two and three days having 
been the average. 

An Order-in-Council has been is- 
sued extending the scope of the Bris- 
bane (Australia) Carting Trade Board 
to omnibuses and other public ve- 
hicles which are drawn by horses or 
driven by power in the Brisbane dis- 
trict. 

Judge MacFarlane, of Pittsburg, 
Pa., on September 10, handed down 
an opinion declaring the Eight-Hour 
law of Pennsylvania constitutional. 
The occasion for the decision was in 
the case of the Coinmonwealth against 
John F. Casey, a contractor engaged 
in work at a filtration plant. 

The entire plant of the Fall River 
cotton mills, owned by M. C. D. Bor- 
den of New York, was shut down on 
September 13 following a strike. The 
weavers, numbering 1000, went on 
strike to enforce their demands for 
an increase of about 10 per cent in 
wages, and as a result the manage- 
ment decided to close the whole 
plant. 

As the result of a conference be- 
tween the officials of the Department 
of Justice, District Attorney Jordan, 
of Pittsburg, and Special Agent 
Hoagland, it was announced that 
there have been no clear cases of 
I)eonage nor any vitilations of the 
Federal labor laws at the Pressed 
Steel Car Company's plant to warrant 
Federal prosecution. 

Eighteen countries were repre- 
sented at the International Trade- 
Union Congress, held at Paris, 
I'Vance, beginning .A.ugust 30. The 
secretary announced a meinbership in 
affiliated organizations of 4,246,000. 
"This is an increase over 1908," the 
secretary says in his report, "and it 
(leinonstrates that, in spite of losses 
in the membership of some countries 
due to industrial causes, trade-union- 
ism is_ advancing steadily." 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Wrong Diagnosis. — Many a gi 
thinks she has broken her heart when 
she has only sprained her imagina- 
tion. — Life. 



A False Allegation. — "I hear the 
Comeups have a peerless daughter." 

"Hardly, peerless. Her father 
bought her a duke last week." — Bal- 
timore American. 



The Climax. — When the thermom- 
eter is in the nineties the climax of 
folly is shown by the fat man who 
drinks three or four highballs and 
races after a street car that he does 
not particularly need to catch. — 
Philadelphia Ledger. 



Impossible. — "Do you believe the 
suffragettes ever get what they 
want?" 

"Not all they want," whispered Mr. 
Enpec, gazing about cautiously. 
"They're women, you know." — Kan- 
sas City Times. 



Seeking Something Practical. — 
"What has become of that inventor 
with a device for signaling Mars?" 

"He has given up the project for 
the present. He is trying to invent 
a signal that is sure to be caught by 
tlie motorman when you are running 
for the last car." — Washington Star. 



Ghostly. — Gertie Wythavoyse — 
"You heard the song 1 sang last even- 
ing at Mile. Misick's recital? All day 
to-day I have hummed and whistled 
nothing else — the tune seems to 
haunt me!" 

Blanche Kruelthyng — "No wonder, 
dearie — the way you murdered it." — 
Judge. 



Charitable. — "I have called tn 
make the arrangements for the trip 
your daughter is to make to Europe 
to have her voice cultivated." 

"But I am not sending my daughter 
to Europe to have her voice culti- 
vated." 

"I know it — it's the neighbors. — 
they made up a purse." — Houston 
Post. 



Joint Accounts 



This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for Instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against the 
account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

Siircc.^sor U> 

THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 

DEPOSITARY OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Capital and Surplus $600,000. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

LEWIS I. COWGILL, President HENRY WILSON 

FREDERICK F. SAYRE. Vice-President ALBERT SUTTON 

L. M. Mao DONALD, Cashier JACOB JENSEN 

J. C. ESCHEN W. H. LITTLE 

Money transmitted to all parts of the world at lowest rates. 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. r. COLLINS. Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



D. EDW^ARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

50 EAST ST., and 4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 




tGENT 0. S. eOVERNMENT CHtRTS IND NAUTICAL PUBLICATIONS 

HrnoeiuPHic and geodetic 



H. J. H. UORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Gore ol Sacramento aod Market Sts.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

DCALEn IN 

Watches, Chronometers, Clocks 

So]id Gold Goods, Diamonds 



MARINE ca, FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by' Transit Observation 
Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN S. CO. 
Baltimore Qlothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. 
Boss of the Road Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 
Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 



Try Baglcy's 
Sweet Tips 

For Pipe or Cigarettes 

lOc Tins 



kTUMDbWDnaU 



(u^^tniii ol tKa >^ 1(6 
!.^gl36k.1NTDIN/mONAl | 




SoremmCh 



All W»tek B«palrinf 



RELIABLE \ 



Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 

715 MARKET STREET next 1o Call Buiming 

Branch Store 2593 Mission Street neat 22nd 

San Francisco, Cal. 

T ^. ., Largest and Finest Assortment in Diamonds 

' 'Watches, Clock.s, Jewelry, Silverware. Cut Glass, Opera 

Clas ses. U mbrellas and Silver Novelties. ^^^ 

<^^ Eyes Eiamined Free by Eipert Opticians ^^ 

Tstcpkonc Kesrny JOIJ j^k. I8K. & UK. Solid OoU WtJdlri Rings Sola by Weljlil 




UNION 



- ^-^^^ ^Ha^ ^-^Jf^H^i MADE 

^ !LJZ!""""iiT .iA.. lafe 



UNITED STATES NAUTICAL COLLEGE 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

This Modern Navigation School has no superior in the world to-day. 
As a practical navigator the Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right e.xperience and ability to teach you up-to-date 
methods in a systematic and e;isy iirunier. You can find one or more of our jjiiplis 
on most any vessel sailing out of tliis port. ASK THEM. 

Advice on Maritime I^aw. Ship's Business and Naturalization FREK. 
Evenings By Appointment. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 

320 MARKET ST., S. F. Visitors Welcome. Telephone Kearny 4686 



SAN FRANCISCO STORE 

Turnishings 
for Men 

From a Complete 
New Fall Stock 

Men's Fancy Golf Shirts— Made 
"f splendid madras and percale 
cloths, these shirts will give splen- 
did wear. They are made in the 
regular shirt or coat styles, with 
cuffs separate or attached. Come 
ill a variety of effective colors, in 
striijcs and small figures. All sizes 
in tile lot. S]H'cial at 75c each. 

Men's Golf Shirts — These shirts 
are made of a good percale and 
for ordinary wear will give great 
satisfaction, inasmuch as the colors 
are good and the shirts well made. 
These shirts are cut on the regular 
shirt pattern, and the cuffs arc at- 
tached. All sizes, from 14 to 17. 
Special at 50c each. 



Market and Sixth Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



PAGB 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Now located at 

82 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry St«., San Franclica 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubbar 
Boots and Oil Clothioe. Seamen's Outflta 
a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at tha 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — ^Look for the Name 
and Number. 



Don't forget Charles Johnson's 

DEFENDER CIGAR STORE 

22 East St., San Francisco. 

.My aim is to please everybody with 

good goods, fair prices and ■ 

courteous treatment. 

Agent for Sheerln's Laundry. 



TKe James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
Political Printinga Specialty 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

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When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal o( Seamen, by Seamen, (or Seamen. 



Out Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXIll. No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1909. 



Whole No. 2036. 



STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



To THE PUBLIC: 
The strike of sailors, firemen and cooks 
against vessels of the Lake Carriers' As- 
sociation continues. Over four months have 
elapsed since the struggle began. 

Have YOU stopped to consider what this strike 
is about? Do you know WHY the seamen mani- 
fest such iron determination to win? There are 
reasons, good, valid reasons. 

An organization of shipowners, known as the 
Lake Carriers' Association, denies American sea- 
men any right to remain members of a labor 
union. Last year this association of employers 
began to discharge seamen for no other reason 
than that the men refused to give up membership 
in their Unions. Throughout the season of 1908 
the shipowners tried some open and many 
shadowy means to force the men to give up then- 
membership in the Unions. 

Failing entirely to break up the organizations 
of the men in these ways, the Lake Carriers then 
tried another scheme to the same end. 

In the spring of this year, 1909, they inaugurated 
the so-called "welfare plan." It was THAT 
which finally forced the strike. 

The name "welfare" looks nice. It sounds 
charitable, well-meaning and benevolent. BUT 
THE NAME WAS ONLY A MASK TO 
COVER A LECHEROUS, COLD-BlOODED 
SCHEME TO ESTABLISH A MODERN 
FORM OF SERFDOM ON THE GREAT 
LAKES. 

The "welfare plan" turned out to be nothing 
less than the vicious and degrading "continuous 
discharge book" system. Each sailor was to be 
compelled to register with and also pay a fee to 
the Lake Carriers' Association. A full personal 
description is taken of every man. He js then to 
be given a "Record Discharge Book," as it is 
called by the shipowners. 

This was to "brand" him permanently— even as 
cattle are branded— a fit subject to be employed 
on association vessels. But this was not enough, 
it seems. That book, without which he was not 
to be employed, may be taken away from him 
without his consent at any time. 

He must deposit it with the ship's master as 
soon as he -goes on board. This rule is required 
so as to place him fully in the power of the ship- 
owner, through the ship's officers. The sailor is 
then to be kept guessing, uncertain all the while, 
whether he will get his own book back again 
when he leaves the vessel or whether he is to be 
blacklisted by being arbitrarily deprived thereof— 
his only means to get work. 

The result of such an intolerable, irrespon.sible 
system, its absolutely certain moral, or rather im- 
moral, effects upon the minds of any class of 
workers who would submit to it, can better be 
imagined than described. 

It would place the seamen ENTIRELY at the 
mercy of the shipowners. Under it every sailor, 
fireman and cook would be subjected to the 
whims and caprices of any one of more than two 
thousand subordinate officials in the employ of 



the vesselowners. Each of these individuals 
would have full and absolute authority to deprive 
any seaman of the discharge book, without which 
the seaman could not again obtain employment. 
Any petty official could deprive any seaman of his 
means of earning a livelihood on the Lakes, for- 
ever. No defense is to be permitted, no reasons 
given. 

The sole purpose of this so-called "welfare" 
scheme is to render the seamen humble and sub- 
missive to every whim of the Lake Carriers, by 
keeping them in constant FEAR of the blacklist. 

IT IS A SPY SYSTEM OF THE MOST 
VICIOUS KIND, COUPLED WITH AN AB- 
SOLUTE IRRESPONSIBLE POWER OF 
PUNISHMENT. IT IS INTENDED TO HOLD 
SEAMEN TO THE SHIPS AT WHATEVER 
WAGES AND CONDITIONS THE SHIP- 
OWNERS MAY CHOOSE TO GIVE. 

How was it that the serfs and slaves were held 
to their masters in the days that all the world 
now blushes to remember? 

It was not PHYSICAL restraint that really 
held the slave. To have applied constant physical 
force would have required as many overseers as 
there were slaves. What was it, then, that held 
them? 

It was FEAR — cra-c-en — impotent — hopeless — 
FEAR, a mental condition created among the 
slaves by the masters, that kept them in bondage 
and prevented them from rebelling. It kept the 
slaves from thinking — from getting together — 
from acting together. Unreasoning dull dread 
held them powerless. It was FEAR, constant, re- 
lentless, ever-present FEAR, that broke their 
spirit and forced them to cringe and submit. 

The would-be masters of free American work- 
ingmen no longer dare to apply very much phys- 
ical restraint. But they still try, at times, to cre- 
ate among workingmen that same mental condi- 
tion, that same FEAR and dread which in the 
days gone by held the slave to his master. 

That is EXACTLY what the misnamed "wel- 
fare plan" of the Lake Carriers' Association aims 
to do to the men on the Great Lakes. MIGHT IS 
TO BE MADE RIGHT. FEAR, SPIRIT- 
BREAKING, SOUL-DESTROYING FEAR, IS 
TO BE MADE LAW— THE LAW OF THE 
LAKES. 

Under this system, once it is permanently es- 
tablished, even the mere act of quitting a vessel, 
except at the will of the master, is punishable. 
The seaman MUST NOT DARE to resent ill- 
treatment— he MUST NOT DARE complain. 
Like the slaves of old he would not be allowed 
to join with his fell»ws in seeking better things. 
He would be denied the human right of organiza- 
tion. If he would voice his grievance at all, it 
must be done "individually," alone and unpro- 
tected. What chance would he have? 

Under continual espionage he would be kept in 
constant FEAR — always in dread of the one fatal 
mark which then would exile him from his call- 
ing forever. A hundred good marks in his dis- 
charge book would avail him nothing. THE 
SYSTEM KNOWS NO MERCY. No matter 
how excellent his previous record his book would 
ALWAYS be subject to irresponsible revocation 
at any time, without redress. Continuous, dull, 
degrading, impotent FEAR is cunningly intended 
to govern his mind. 



This, then, is the system against which the 
sailors, marine firemen and marine cooks are on 
strike. This is the damnable "welfare plan" of 
the Lake Carriers' Association. Can any one 
blame the seamen for so stubbornly refusing to 
submit to it? 

It is to PREVENT SERFDOM on the Lakes 
that the seamen are struggling. They are fighting 
to maintain their LIBERTY. They KNOW this. 
They understand the REAL issue. That is why 
the strike goes on. That is why the seamen 
will continue the struggle until an honorable set- 
tlement, abolishing "The discharge book system," 
and recognizing the right of organization, is 
agreed to by the shipowners. 

Can any liberty-loving, red-blooded, honest man 
deny the justice of the position taken by the 
Unions of Seamen in this strike? 

WHY do the Lake Carriers want to disorganize 
the seamen? 

WHY do they so eagerly desire to break the 
Unions? 

WHY do they inaugurate the misnamed "wel- 
fare" scheme, intended to render the men as help- 
less and as obsequious as serfs? 
WHY? 

It is because the Lake Carriers want LABOR 
on the Lakes made more submissive, more servile, 
and therefore CHEAPER. So that the old system 
of miserably low wages, formerly in vogue on the 
Lakes under these same Lake Carriers, may be 
again instituted. 

It's a "business" proposition. The Lake Car- 
riers aim to reduce the labor cost, WAGES. Not 
only to REDUCE wages, but to KEEP wages 
down after the old low level is again reached. 

Organization among workers means improved 
wages and conditions. It means increased labor 
cost, more pay for the workers. The shipowners 
recognize this as a fact, they object to it, and 
therefore are endeavoring to disorganize the sea- 
men. 

If they succeed, WHAT THEN? Will a return 
to the old conditions which prevailed some years 
ago, low wages, long hours, short crews and lay- 
offs, benefit any one except the shipowners? 

What will be the effect upon the wages and 
conditions of OTHER workers connected with 
the shipping industry? Will not the standard of 
.ALL be lowered? Will the "company stores," 
the "company living houses," and all their at- 
tendant evils make their appearance in the Lake 
cities and towns? IS NOT THAT THE HIS- 
TORY OF THE IRON AND STEEL INDUS- 
TRY? 

THEN — -what about the effect upon the busi- 
ness men in the many ports where the patronage 
of seamen and dockworkcrs is of most importance 
to the retail merchants? 

Will not the workers, the merchants, even the 
very cities and towns, suffer alike? 

IS IT NOT TO THE INTEREST OF ALL 
TO PREVENT THIS? 

THE SAILORS, MARINE FIREMEN AND 
MARINE COOKS NOW ON STRIKE DE- 
SERVE THE SUPPORT AND SYMPATHY 
OF EVERY MAN, WOMAN AND CHILD IN 
THE GREAT LAKES REGION. IN DEFENSE 
OF AMERICAN MANHOOD, AMERICAN 
IDEALS AND AMERICAN FREEDOM, THE 
STRIKE MUST BE WON. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



LABOR IN THE NETHERLANDS. 



The new law governing labor contracts in 
the Netherlands which went into effect on 
February 1, 1909, contains the following 
provisions : 

In the civil code of the Netherlands only 
three paragraphs referred to "the hiring of 
servants and workingmen," but as that law 
was enacted prior to the year 1838 it is not 
surprising that its stipulations were con- 
sidered too one-sided under the present con- 
ditions of labor and living; hence a new 
law was presented and received the sanction 
of both Chambers of the States-General. 

The contract or agreement between em- 
ployer and employe or laborer may be 
made verbally as well as in writing; in the 
latter case all costs and charges in connec- 
tion therewith are for account of the work- 
giver (employer), who is supposed to be 
financially the stronger party. 

All contracts, and even receipts for wages, 
are exempted from "stamp tax." If agree- 
ment to deviate from the requirements of 
the law should be made, which is in some 
instances allowed, it is essential that a 
written contract be made. 

A married woman, who is still consid- 
ered as a minor in Dutch judicature, is spe- 
cially permitted to accept a jjosition, sign 
the labor contract, and collect the wages, 
without the consent of the husband; but 
when she contracts, as an employer, for the 
services of household servants, .she is sup- 
posed to have first obtained the required 
permission of her husband. 

Thus far the Dutch husband has had the 
sole right to dispose of the income of his 
wife, unless it was distinctly agreed by con- 
tract made before the marriage that such 
should not be the case, but this general rule 
has, by the new law, been revoked as far 
as the income of the wife as "laborer" is 
concerned. In order to prevent the hus- 
band from lawfully claiming the earnings of 
his wife and spending them in any manner 
he sees fit, this law provides thsk the mar- 
ried woman is entitled to "the disposal, in 
the interest of the household," of all mon- 
eys which she earns or which is due to her 
under an existing labor contract. 

A minor can only contract for labor with 
the permission of his father or guardian, 
which permission is considered as given 
when the lawful representative has not 
raised any objection within four weeks after 
the contract has gone into effect. 

In everything connected with the labor 
agreement the minor has the same rights as 
if he were of age, with two exceptions: d) 
He cannot begin legal proceedings unless 
assisted by his lawful representative, and 
(2) as to the collection of his wages he is 
still a minor. The written contract may 
contain a stipulation that his wages are 
wholly or partly payable to his lawful rep- 
resentative, and even if a written contract 
does not exist this payment will have to be 
made to his lawful representative if the lat- 
ter insists upon it in writing. To avoid all 
possible complications in regard to the work- 
giver refusing to pay the minor his wages 
or the father or guardian claiming his 
wages, the law provides that the work-giver 
is fully discharged of all obligations by mak- 
ing payment to the minor unless the lawful 
representative has forbidden by contract or 
in writing that such payments should be 
made to such minor. 



If the work-giver be a minor he will not 
be allowed to make an agreement or con- 
tract unless he has been declared of age in 
all forms of law. 

Regulations made up by the work-giver 
(employer) are only binding on the work- 
men in the following instances: (1) A com- 
plete copy of the rules must be handed to 
the laborer; (2) a copy must be filed, for 
the information of the public, with the jus- 
tice of peace in the district where the work- 
ing place in question is located, and (3) a 
copy must be posted for reference in the 
factory or workroom. 

Wages must be paid to the workmen in 
person unless a written authority exists by 
which somebody else is authorized to col- 
lect the same. The wages must, as a rule, 
be paid in currency. Products of the busi- 
ness may only to a small extent take the 
place of cash money in payment of wages. 
Thus, if previously agreed upon, a baker, 
for instance, is allowed to give his help one 
loaf of bread per day in part payment of 
his wages. House servants, waiters, seam- 
stresses, who are in the domestic circle of 
the employer, are partly paid by the board- 
ing and lodging which they receive. But, 
as a fundamental principle, it has been laid 
down in the law that payment or part pay- 
ment in the .shape of groceries and other 
neces-sities of life are illegal and void. This 
restriction has been made with a view of 
putting a stop to the practice of forcing 
upon workmen the obligation of buying in 
certain stores kept by the employer or his 
proteges and drawing their wages in the 
necessaries of life for themselves and fami- 
lies, which, in many instances, has been the 
cause of defraudation on the part of the em- 
])loyers and of great dissatisfaction among 
the working people. 

The new law provides that the amount of 
wages which, owing to the ignorance or 
economical weakness of the workman, is not 
paid in cash may again be claimed, and must 
then be paid a second time by the employer. 
Payment of wages must be made at the end 
of the agreed period; thus week laborers 
must be paid at the end of every week. 

In case the payment does not take place 
in time the work man or woman can claim 
after the third day 5 per cent additional for 
five daj'S and 1 per cent for every further 
da}' to which the payment is deferred, but 
it must never exceed 50 per cent of the 
week's wages. Sunday labor must not be 
exacted unless it is specially agreed upon 
by written contract. 

Funds are permitted to be established for 
the purpose of payments to the working 
people in case of illness, infirmity, death, 
etc., and the contribution of the employe 
may be deducted from his wages, but the 
interested workmen must be represented in 
the management of such funds and the 
moneys must be kept entirely separate from 
the business and personal possessions of the 
employer. The rules and regulations of 
such funds are binding as soon as they are 
signed by the representative managers and 
filed with the justice of peace of the district. 

A copy of the rules and regulations must 
also be kept plainly visible in the factory 
or workshop. 

All employes who are boarding with their 
employers are entitled to medical treatment 
for at least six weeks, unless he or she on 
their own accord should prefer to be nursed 
and treated elsewhere. 



The employer, however, is not obliged to 
have the employe treated in his (the em- 
ployer's) house; the law insists upon 
"proper treatment," and when the employe 
is sent to a hospital for account of the em- 
ployer the requirements of the law are 
fully met. 

Fines will only be exacted under the fol- 
lowing conditions: (1) Where they have 
i)een agreed upon in the labor contract and 
the amount of the fines therein stated; (2) 
the contract must be in writing and the em- 
ployer and employe must both have signed 
it; (3) the disposition to be made of the 
fines must be clearly stated ; (4) the em- 
ployer is obliged to give a written statement 
showing the amount of fine and the reason 
for its deduction. The amount of fines is 
not to exceed one day's wages out of one 
week's pay. 

The requirements of law must be ob- 
served by all employers and employes, with 
the exception of shipowners and captains 
and crews of seagoing vessels. Employes 
and workmen whose income amounts to 
$480 per year are considered more or less 
financially independent, and for such some 
paragraphs of the law which are strictly 
binding for workmen earning less wages 
mav be deviated from or set aside. 



TIDES OF PUGET SOUND. 



The waters of the Narrows, from which 
a party of University of Puget Sound stu- 
dents escaped through good fortune after 
a boat was upset, are treacherous. It is a 
place of terrible tides. Viewed from the 
precipitous shores the surging waters are 
magnificent. The scene has been compared 
with the Hudson above New York City. 
The waters of that part of Puget Sound 
which extends to Olympia, Mud r>ay, Shei- 
ton and Henderson Hay, a vast inland .sea 
within itself, all flow in and out of the Nar- 
rows. 

In the upper reaches of the sound some 
twenty-five or thirty miles from the Narrows 
the tides attain a height of more than twenty 
feet. When the tides begin to fall all the 
accumulated water rushes out through the 
Narrows like a great river at flood. In like 
manner when the tide sets in the direction of 
Olympia the Narrows become a swift and 
turbulent stream. Frightful whirlpools arc 
numerous. Streams running powerfully in 
contrary directions strike and the water 
boils. 

Large steamboats struck by the contrary 
currents groan and creak and sway under the 
strain. This being .so, it is no wonder that 
small craft often overturn in the Narrows. 
A whirlpool has been known to seize a row- 
boat and twist it round and round until the 
rowers almost despaired of coming out alive. 
It is a marvelously beautiful water with all 
its terrors, and hundreds and thousands will 
continue to find pleasure there, notwith- 
standing the summer tragedies. The rumble 
of the tides when running at full is like the 
distant rumble of the ocean. The terrors of 
the sea are an element of its charm, and so 
it is with the terrors of the Narrows? — Ta- 
coma Ledger. 



Natural gas from certain wells in Kansas 
is found to contain 2 per cent, of helium and 
scientific experts are working on the problem 
of extracting it. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 













•^^* 




On the Atlantic Coast. 

( Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions. ) 




•^^^ 













GOLDEN DAYS OF STEAMBOATING. 



The golden days of steamboating on 
Western waters began shortly before Fort 
Benton was reached. The Mississippi and 
all its principal tributaries, especially the 
Ohio, the Missouri and the Illinois, swarmed 
with steamboats. Between 1850 and 1860 
the population of St. Louis much more than 
doubled, jumping from 77,000 in the former 
year to 160,000 in the latter. St. Louis in 
those days, with steamboat communication 
extending from New Orleans to St. Paul, 
and from Pittsburg to Fort Benton, was the 
busiest inland port in the world. New York 
led with steamboat tonnage, nearly all of 
which, however, was ocean tonnage, while 
New Orleans was second and St. Louis was 
third. Much of New Orleans' traffic was by 
way of the Gulf of Mexico and the ocean, 
but in aggregate of its steamboat trade it 
was only slightly in the lead of St. Louis. 
Everywhere on nearly all the big streams of 
the Mississippi watershed steamboats were 
almost always in sight. On the river-traffic 
maps of those days St. Louis was the hub 
of a wheel with spokes running in every 
direction. The Civil War, which, for the 
time shut ofT the river traffic with New Or- 
leans and most of the other towns south of 
the mouth of the Ohio, and which made 
trade along the Ohio sometimes dangerous, 
hampered communication along the big 
stream and some of its lower tributaries ; 
but that on the upper Mississippi, the Mis- 
souri and the Illinois increased. During the 
ten years covering the Civil War era St. 
Louis' inhabitants almost doubled, reaching 
310,000 in 1870. 

In all those years the growth in Missis- 
sippi River traffic reflected the expansion in 
the interests and activities of the great val- 
ley. The steamboat was a large factor in 
the winning of the West. Then came the 
advent of the railroad and the decline and 
fall of steam navigation on the Western 
streams, aside from those connecting the 
Great Lakes. Chicago got its first through 
railway connection with the East in 1853. 
In 1854 the Mississippi was touched by the 
railway at Rock Island, and in 1857 the rail- 
way reached East St. Louis. It was not un- 
til the Eads bridge was opened in 1874, how- 
ever, that St. Louis obtained 'direct railway 
communication with the Atlantic seaboard. 
Railway building in Missouri began in 1851, 
and there was much rail traffic through the 
State during the war period, except as it 
was interrupted by rebel incursions. It was 
not until after 1880, however, that the rail- 
road became a serious rival of the rivers. 
In 1869 the first of the transcontinental 
roads, the Union and the Central Pacific, 
was completed, and Villard's Northern Pa- 
cific was finished in 1883. By the latter date, 
through the paralleling of the rivers by the 
railways, the latter began to gain their as- 
cendancy in the Mississippi Valley. As 
measured by the traffic at St. Louis, which 
was 416,000 tons in 1906, 368,000 in 1907, and 
365,000 in 1908, the river trade of a large 
part of the big valley is steadily diminishing. 
A revival of river navigation is certain to 
come in the near future as a necessity of in- 
dustry and commerce in the West, but it will 



probably never reach the proportions which 
it had a third or a half century ago. In the 
meantime who that remembers the great 
steamboating days on the Mississippi, the 
Missouri and the Illinois dreamed in those 
times that the big stream would ever shrink 
to its present little measure? — St. Louis 
Globe-Democrat. 



ICEBERGS IN NORTH ATLANTIC. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Perilous experiences befalling the Allan 
liner Mongolian and the British freighters 
Madura and Bisley off the eastern coast of 
Newfoundland indicate an unusually mild 
.season in the Far North. So much heavy ice 
as that reported by these steamers is seldom 
released from the Arctic anchorages. 

The Mongolian, with several hundred pas- 
sengers on board, was wedged so tightly for 
two days in a terrific ice jam off the harbor 
of St. John's that the powerful sealing 
steamer Diana, built to fight her way 
through just such obstructions, was unable 
to give assistance, though she made every 
ciTort to do so. Both the Madura and the 
Bisley report immense fields of pan, or floe, 
ice in the same latitude, broken from the 
Greenland glaciers. 

There are two distinct drifts of northern 
ice. A great deal of what is called in the 
gulf of St. Lawrence the board, or shore, 
ice, is caught in the Labrador current and 
driven through the strait of Belle Isle, be- 
tween Newfoundland and the Labrador 
coast. Much of this afterward finds its way 
through Northumberland strait, separating 
Prince Edward Island from New Brunswick 
and Nova Scotia, where it often impedes 
navigation for weeks at a time. Twenty- 
five or thirty years ago some one with a 
genius for the grotesque, proposed to re- 
lieve ice conditions in the lower gulf by 
damming Belle Isle from Blanc Sablon in 
Newfoundland to Forteau in Labrador! 
The other drift is off the east coast of New- 
foundland, and in this is encountered not 
only the floe ice, but also most of the bergs, 
and the larger hummocks that are evidences 
of the huge pressure ridges in the Far North. 

The danger to navigation from the eastern 
ice drift lies mainly in the possibility of a 
ship being crushed in the floating pack. Col- 
lisions with icebergs are rare. ATany years 
ago, when the old Arizona was rated as an 
ocean greyhound, her bow plates were stove 
in through contact with a berg, and earlier 
still the mysterious disappearance of the In- 
man liner City of Boston led to the belief 
that she had foundered after a similar dis- 
aster. But the approach of ice is easily de- 
tected even in a fog, and those steamers that 
are compelled to use the long northern 
course where ice abounds in the spring 
months can protect themselves with lowered 
speed and a sharp lookout. Apprehension of 
disaster is therefore not large, but the physi- 
cal aspects of the unusual ice drift will be 
interesting to meteorologists who may es- 
tablish a relation between them and the wea- 
ther, and to exploring scientists, who will 
speculate as to the effect an early Arctic 
spring may have upon the fortunes of Com- 
mander Peary and Dr. Cook. — Brooklyn 
Eagle. 



International Seamen's Union of America, Ij/a 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 1^ Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 85 West St. New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine P'iremen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Great Britain. 

National Sailors and I''iremen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull, 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepcstr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Seemannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 

Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundct, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

Denmark. 

Somandencs Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 

Austria. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 

Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, I (Bar- 
celoneta) Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Marineros, Monte- 
video. Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvette. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Tlif total miinber of fatal accidents 
at Urilish mines and quarries in July 
was 116, as comi)ared with 98 in June, 
and 88 a year ago. 

The number of fatal accidents to 
British seamen reported in July was 
67, as compared with 82 in June, and 
89 in July, 1908. 

The changes in hcmrs of British 
lab(jr taking effect in July affected 
840 workpeople, whose working time 
was reduced by 2,059 hours per week. 
In several departments of the Vic- 
torian (Australia) railway service the 
employes are in a state of semi-revolt 
against Government sweating. 

The number of British paupers re- 
lieved on one day in July in thirty- 
live urban districts corresponded to a 
rate of 220 per 10,000 of the estimated 
population. 

The British Federation of Cotton 
Spinners has decided to continue run- 
ning the mills, using .American cotton 
only, four days a week until Novem- 
ber 8. This is six weeks longer than 
was originally intended. 

The Industrial Court in Sydney. 
.Australia, has agreed to appoint a 
Wages Board to create a standard of 
hours and wages for cabmen. In 
making the application the secretary 
of the union said that some of the 
men worked as many as 140 hours per 
week. 

John Burns, President of the Local 
Government Board in England, claims 
that Great Britain leads in the crusade 
against tuberculosis, and has stated 
that the direct remedies which would 
eradicate the disease would be higher 
wages, less betting, and more regular 
work. 

The total number of accidents re- 
ported under the British Factory and 
Workshop .Act in July was 71, as com- 
pared with 65 in the previous month, 
and 72 a year ago. The corresponding 
figures for workpeople employed in 
the railway service were 24, 23, and 
35 respectively. 

The secretary of the Slaughtermen's. 
Union of New South Wales recently 
proceeded against Miller & Company, 
carcass butchers, for an alleged 
breach of agreement in having worked 
certain employes on Easter Monday. 
The respondents pleaded guilty, and 
were fined Ss., with 21s. costs, or 24 
hours. 

The latest Australian Common- 
wealth Year Book gives the follow- 
ing as the average amount of salaries 
and wages paid per employe in 1907: 
New South Wales £80.63, Victoria 
£69.33, Queensland £71.82, South 
Australia £80, West Australia 
£114.23, Tasmania £74.40, Common- 
wealth £77.17. 

The International Miners' Confer- 
ence at Berlin has adopted a resolu- 
tion, congratulating British miners on 
the enactment of the Mines (Eight- 
Hours) bill, demanding also similar 
legislation in other countries, and the 
restriction of the working day to six 
hours where the temperature is 82 de- 
grees or more. 

The High Court in Melbourne, .Aus- 
tralia, has granted leave to the Com- 
monwealth to intervene in respect to 
a special case stated by the President 
of the Court of Conciliation and .Ar- 
bitration, in the matter of a dispute 
between the Federated Sawmill Tim- 
ber Yard and General Woodworkers' 
Association vs. James Moore & Com- 
pany, and other timber merchants. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LIPPM AN BROS. 

532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next to Fritz & Ernest 
SAN PEDRO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Union Goods for Union Men 



CJHfTBUSl'EH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S 





SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
.All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentuuk> 
Dl.-iillerlea and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stoclt. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth. SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a ful4 line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
tiaving been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to Itnow the class of goods you want. Thr a.-in Francisco 
Hicltory Shirt at BO cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loosvj labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. V. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
seaman Ernst Dau, please notify the 
German Consul at San Francisco. 

James Thoburn was at the Sea- 
men's Institute about 1902. Letter 
awaiting him at 242 Steuart street, 
San Francisco. 

James Sample, last heard of on ship 
Santa Rita in .^pril, 1909, is inquired 
for by Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart 
street. 

Arthur John Martin. Was in San 
Francisco last March. Any news of 
him sent to Seamen's Institute will be 
appreciated. 

Robert Fordyee Bowers, over 5 
feet in height, rather stout, was in 
American Navy during 1906. Letter 
awaiting him at Seamen's Institute, 
242 Steuart street, San Francisco. 

Robert Fordyee Bowers, age 33 
years, height over 5 feet, stout build; 
correspondence awaiting him at Sea- 
men's Institute, 242 Steuart street, San 
Francisco. 

Sainuel England, age 48 years, com- 
municate with Seamen's Institute, 242 
Steuart street, San Francisco. 

John M. Murphy, dark hair, blue 
eyes, height 5 feet 8, smooth face. 
Last heard of at Oakland. Any in- 
formation, communicate Seamen's In- 
stitute, 242 Steuart street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Harry W. Morse, of Watertown, 
Mass., about 5 ft. 8, light hair, blue 
eyes, wore glasses. Enquiry from 
Lillian J. Morse. Letter awaiting him 
at Seamen's Institute, Steuart street, 
San Francisco. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

LEVrsl)EPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



C. L. M UN SON 

Dealer in 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



JACOB OLSBN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST.. GPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



Andersson, Albin. 
A lander, O. J. 
Animusen, Martin 
Anderson, A. 
-\nderson, Hans J. 
Asplund, Emil 
."Vnderstn, Harald 
-VnUerson, Henry 
.-Anderson, Oscar 
Axelsson, C. B. 
Apps, P. 

Anderson, O. -12S6 
Bray, J. K. 
Bensen, Ray 
Bausbacli, Erwin 
Bery, Charles 
Berger, Joe 
Berggren, G. -349 
Barrach, Herman 
Backman, Adolf 
Bjorseth, Knut 
Bade, Alexander 
Berggren, John 
Bolander, J. E. 
Brobacit, Charles E. 
Hersin, Jacob 
Carlsson, N. 
Christensen, Harry 
Carlson, C. G. F. 
Cliristiansen, Hj. 
Carlsson, A. 
Capello, H. 
Carlson, Chas. 
Celley, Edward 
Cluistenson, John 
Christiansen, -901 
Colombay, Louis 
Charlsen, Charlie 
Calnan, George 
Castro, Manuel 
D.ahlman. J. A. 
Dories. J. H. 
Danielsoti, E. B. 

(Package) 
Bnglebright. Harry 
Ebapanen, W. 
Engbretsen, -668 
Ericklnson. Eric 
Ellingsen, F. 
Erickson, Charley 
Fredriksen, H. G. 

-529 
Folvig, John 
Fridlund. John 
Foldat, John 
Gelger. Josef 
Gustafson. Geo. 
Gray, Gustav 
Oliser, Walter 
Gulbrandsen, A. 
• xliese. W. 
Ilazzal. S. G. 
Ilarmening, F. 
Holz. P. 
Ilecknian, Fred 
Holy, Otto -1764 
Hage, Arne 
Hansen. Bert 
liaupt, Emil 
Hansen, Haakon 
H.inson. Jacob 
llenriksen, Aug. E. 
Ilnlni. Stephan 
Ingl>rftsen, -668 
Ingebretsen, O. -125 
Johnson, F. -1911 
Jensen, J. -1801 
Johansen, C. -1191 
.lobson, Charles 
.Fonsen. Thomas 
.Inlmson, G. E. 
Jeshke, H. 



Jeffersen, V. 

Jacobson, John 

Jensen, J. H. -1311 

Johannsen, Christian 

Jansohn, J. -1440 

Kalberg, VV. -688 

Kattel, J. 

Karsberg, C. 

Knudsen, Billy 

Kruger, H. 

Lau, Gustav 

Lynd, Charley 

Larsen, Chris 

Long, Harry 

Lange, Frederik 

l.uman, Alku 

Lawson, Jack 

Loeman, Charles 

I..und, Harry C. 

Lundstrom, Sam 

Lewis, G. 

Lactat, Victor 

Larsen, Marinius 

Mulley, James 

McMahon, John 

McFadden, W. 

Manning, W. 

Muller, Hugo 

Melin, Einar 

Nestor, Wilson 

Nielsen, Sivert 

Nielsen, J. A. -780 

Nurmi, Victor 

Nyberg, Erik 

Newman, John 

Osterholm, -867 

Olsen, Adolf 

Olesen, Geo. 

Olsson, Erik 

Olsen. Oluf 

Orten. Sigurd 

Ohm, Gunvall 

Oustad, Hans 

Olson, Bertel 

Owens, Joseph H. 

Peterson, Oscar C. 

Petersen, O. -864 

Peterson, F. G. 

Pagel, Erwin 

Pereitzes, H. 

Peratis, N. 

Paulsson. Adolf 

Panier, A. 

Passou, Teddy 

Petersen. W. -1284 

Peterson, Th. -563 

Raymond. J. 

Remmel, F. 
Robsham, Jens W. 
Rodrlquez, Manuel 
Rosan, Oscar 
Ruter. Herman 
Seller, Willy 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Siverberg, Harry 
Svendsen, Otto F. 
Smith, J. S. 
Sorensen, -1664 
Soderstrom, A. I. 
Scott, Ed 
Svedstrup, E. 
Schlobies, Chas. 
Torres, Lojo. V. 
Torjussen. Gunvald 
Thorson, Tom 
Tillman, C. -763 
Vlk, Jakob 
Vidal. Juan 
Wldin, Andrew 
Westad, Johan 
Yager, A. 
Zimmerman, F. C. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Camille Moortgat, who arrived at 
San Francisco in September last, is 
inquired for by the Belgian Consulate 
at San Francisco. 

Donald Corsie, sailor, aged about 
55, left the Great Lakes in 1885 for 
the West Coast and probably Aus- 
tralia, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Wm. McLaughlin, Julius Franz, K. 
Grunert, J. Koglund, W. Wickstrom 
and C. Christensen, who were mem- 
bers of the crew of the schooner Min- 
nie E. Caine at the time of her wreck, 
are inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Mr. James Clapton, of Newport, 
Mon., England. Letter awaiting him 
at Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart 
street, San Francisco. 

Frank Posstethwaite, who left 
Monteagle at Vancouver, B. C, May 
26, 1906. Letter awaiting him at 
Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart street, 
San Francisco. Any information 
gratefully received. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




William Moran, the shipbuilder, a member of 
the firm of Moran Brothers, died at Seattle on 
Se])tcmber 13. He was the fourth of the eight 
Moran brothers to die within four years. 

Adam Donaldson was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on September 13 as master 
of the steamer Carlos, vice E. N, Hardwick. The 
schooner Pinole, H. G. Plate master, was en- 
rolled. 

The United States engineers have completed a 
.-.urvey of the Columbia River between Vancouver 
and the mouth of the Willamette and the dredge 
Oregon will be put to work deepening the channel 
at once. 

After lying idle in Young's Bay, near Astoria, 
for the past year, the schooner W. F. Jewett has 
been chartered to transport lumber from Port- 
land to San Pedro. She is expected to take out 
500,000 feet of fir. 

The Seattle Maru, the second steamer of the 
line to run between Osaka and Seattle in con- 
nection with the new Chicago, Milwaukee and 
Puget Sound Railroad, saile'd from Tokio on 
September 11 on her maiden voyage. 

I. N. Hibberd, well known in commercial and 
shipping circles of San Francisco, was appointed 
1)3' Governor Gillett on September 18 to a place 
on the Board of Pilot Commissioners to suc- 
icceed the late C. Erskine. 

It is now considered probable that France will 
send a mission instead of a warship to attend the 
celebration at San Francisco next October of the 
discovery of the Golden Gate by Gaspar de Por- 
tola. Spain also probably will send a deputation. 

General Manager George Higbee of the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company, declared recently that 
it had not been decided whether the cut rate of 
$6.35 declared by Schubach & Hamilton of Seattle, 
for first-class passage from San Francisco to Los 
.\ngeles on the steamer St. Croix would be met. 

Thirty members of the crew of the Japanese 
scaling schooner Kaisen Maru, arrested early last 
June for alleged poacliing, were acquitted by a 
jury in the United States Court at Juneau, Alaska, 
on September 24, the evidence against them being 
very weak. 

John S. Smith was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on September 20 as master 
of the steamer George f.oomis vice John W. 
Spencer. The schooner Oceania Vance, F. G, 
Scott master, and the schooner Annie Eliza, A. 
Ketelson master, were enrolled. 

A submarine signaling apparatus was installed 
on the Matson Navigation Company's steamer 
Lurline, which sailed from San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 17 for Honolulu, and it is hoped that she 
will be able to get into operation with the sub- 
marine bells on the lightship when returning to 
San Francisco. 

The White Pass Railroad announces that the 
last down-river steamer on the Yukon will leave 
White Horse for Dawson on October 7. The last 
steamer from Dawson for White Horse sails on 
October 11. The steamers up the Yukon are now 
bringing out full loads of Dawson and Fairbanks 
l)eople. 

Officers of the .Alaska Development Company 
say that while it is true there are a large number 
of men destitute at Nome, it is not true, as stated 
in a Wasliington dispatch, that they are or have 
been employes of that company. The Govern- 
ment has sent a revenue cutter to take the strand- 
ed Americans from Nome. 

The following changes of masters ivere record- 
ed at the San Francisco Custom-house on Septem- 
ber 23: Steamer San Jacinto, Berthal Carlson 
vice N. J. Rasmussen; steamer City of Topeka, J. 
O. Faria vice C. F. Hall; schooner Harry, Philip 
Herman vice L. Dreyersdorff ; steamer Mabel, F. 
C. Buskey vice J. C. Chipman. 

Revival in shipping, which was promised for 
Ihis fall by well-informed shipping men, has be- 
•come a fact, so far as coastwise and Oriental ship- 
ping is concerned. All coastwise vessels are car- 
rying full cargoes and in some cases it is neces- 
s-'ry to put on new vessels to take the overflow 
of the regular liners. 

\ugust Johnson, the contractor who furnished 
lishermen for an Alaska salmon season, filed a 
suit in admiralty in the United States District 
Court at San Francisco on September 24 against 
the Red Salmon Canning Company, owner of the 
hark B, P. Cheney, to recover $291, wages alleged 
to be due the crew he furnished that craft. 

Francis H. Porter of San Francisco, Chief In- 
s])cctor of the Fire Underwriters' Inspection Bu- 
reau, is urging the Tacoma Council and water 
front property owners to built a much-needed fire 
b'>-t ^\■itho^t delay. The Council has appropriated 
"^.^OOOO for the fire tug and plans are being drawn. 
The railroads will probably contribute about $30,- 
OOn more needed. 

The following changes of masters were recorded 
;i| the San I'"rancisco Custom-house on September 
24: S learner Defiance, J. G. Trapp vice L. T-. 
I angren; steamer Virgil G. Bogue, Erik Olson 
vice Gust Johnson; schooner Nettie, Matz iTus 
feldt vice Isak Tsakson; steamer San Joaquin, Aus- 
tin H. Hall vice J. M. D'ixon; steamer Dauntless, 
L. L. Langren vice C. C. Tichworth. 



An order has been received at Seattle from the 
Secretary of Commerce and Labor ordering tele- 
phones out of the local office of the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors, and shipping men are pro- 
testing vigorously. Lack of communication be- 
tween the sub-inspectors and the office delays the 
inspection of vessels, and with the operation of 
steamships running from $500 to $1000 a day's 
delay is costly. 

Two vessels of the Pacific Coast salmon fleet 
arrived at San Francisco on September 23 from the 
•Maskan fishing grounds. They were the Llew- 
ellyn J. iMorse and the Star of F'rance. The 
Morse came from Kogguing in twenty days, and 
brought down 41,500 cases of salmon consigned to 
the Alaska Packers' Association. Both vessels 
report having had an uneventful trip down the 
coast, the weather being fair. The other vessels 
of the salmon fleet are following in close order 
and will be arriving daily during the next few 
days. 

The Argentine Government has offered Captain 
Balcom and his associates of Vancouver $25,000 
compensation for the seizure four years ago of 
the sealing schooner Agnes G. Donahue, which 
was taken by an Argentine gunboat while seal- 
ing in the South Atlantic, and Captam Ryan and 
crew of twenty men were thrown into prison at 
Montevideo. The schooner was released some 
months after and the sealers were freed after 
serving several months in prison. The owners 
claimed $52,000 damages, and after some negotia- 
tions the British Colonial Office has submitted the 
offer of settlement from Argentina, which the 
Dominion Government recommends the owners 
accept. 

Decision was rendered at San Francisco on 
September 20 by F'ederal Steamboat Inspectors 
O, F. Bolles and John K. Bulger on the charges 
of negligence and unskilful navigation brought 
against William Treanor, Neil McLeod and 
Thomas Mcintosh, respectively master, chief- 
mate and second-mate of the steamer Winne- 
bago. The steamer was lost on July 3 last, on a 
submerged rock at Point Arena in a dense fog, 
and the Inspectors found Captain Treanor negli- 
gent and suspended his license for sixty days; and 
that Chief-mate McLeod was also negligent and 
unskilful and his license is suspended for a period 
of six months. The charges against T. Mcintosh, 
the second-mate, are not proved, according to the 
Inspectors' findings, and they exonerate him from 
blame. 

The Alaska Junk Company, which bought the 
wreck of the steamer Yosemite, which went 
aground near Bremerton, Wash., a couple of 
months ago, is now actively engaged in demolish- 
ing the once fine passenger steamer. The Yo- 
seinite was built in 1862, The machinery in the 
old traveler is heavy and cumbersome, when com- 
pared with modern appliances. Everything mov- 
able is being stripped from the wreck. Among 
other things found in her were the pumps in her 
bilge. These were about five times the size of 
similar pumps made to-day, and unlike the mod- 
ern pumps, the ones in the Yosemite were con- 
structed wholly of brass. These" were removed 
without being broken up. The wreckers say that 
notwithstanding the forty-five years' constant 
service to which the old vessel was subjected, 
her timbers are still in good condition. 

Interesting tests are being made with a newly 
invented life-saving and wreck-locating gear by 
Frank P. Brust of Seattle, the inventor. The in- 
vention is a buoy held in a cylindrical tank fast 
to a steamer's deck, with a connecting rope coiled 
on a windlass, and when a vessel sinks equipped 
with this gear the inrush of water through aper- 
tures in the cylinder forces the buoy free and 
it floats to the surface. The buoy, which is pear- 
shaped and surmounted by a bell rung by the ac- 
tion of the waves, has a number of buoys attached 
to it. The released buoy floated up from a sunk- 
en wreck not only marks the spot where the 
vessel is foundered and the depth — this is shown 
by the marking of the line released from the 
windlass — but offers succor to the survivors. They 
are attracted by the ringing of the bell to the 
buoy, where on reaching it, they can easily detach 
the life buoys fastened to it and cling to lashings 
made fast to it. 



To Mariners: You will please take notice that 
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 
has installed and is maintaining Ijetween San 
Pedro and Terminal Island, one (1) subaqueous 
telephone and telegraph cable, 750 feet in length. 
That at said points said company will maintain 
monuments indicating the place where said cable 
lies. Do not drop anchor at these points, San 
Pedro, Cal,, December, 1907. 



F. R. WALL, who, was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1.209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg,, Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., IViA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St, 
NEW TORIC, N. Y,, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 50 Union St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La,, 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St, 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass,, 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La,, 514 Dumaine St, ' 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y,, 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md,, 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. T. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III,, 674 West Madison St, 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis,, 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N, Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O,, 87 Bridge St. ' 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich,, 7 Woodbridge St,, East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis,, 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich,, 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies: 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 305 French St. 
CONNBAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 63 East Kinzie St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO. Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 .ludson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Eraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CIjEVELAND, Ohio. 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, ID,, 242 South Water St. 
MIl.WAirKEE. Wis,. 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montlis - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all ronimunications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the .lOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The .lOURNAL is not responsible for 
the express.lons of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 29, 1909. 



THE LAKE STRIKE. 



The article published on paye 1 ot this 
issue is a verbatim reproduction of a circu- 
lar prepared by Secretary Olander, of the 
Lake Seamen's Union, and widely distrib- 
uted in the ports of the Great Lakes. Com- 
rade Olander states the issue involved in the 
Lake seamen's strike in a way that could 
hardly be excelled for clearness, point and 
pith. The reader will at once understand 
the motive that insjiires the Lake seamen 
in their struggle against the efforts of the 
Lake Carriers' Association to destroy all or- 
ganization among the men who sail on the 
Great Lakes. That motive is not merely to 
preserve the unions, but to preserve free- 
dom, freedom from a species of espionage 
and blacklisting that must, if successful, re- 
duce the seamen to the level of so many 
.soulless serfs. In such a struggle every 
nerve and fiber of manhood is inspired, as 
in a struggle for life or death. It is this in- 
spiration of freedom, rather than any ma- 
terial considerations of wages or working 
conditions, that has sustained the Lake sea- 
men throughout the struggle, and which will 
sustain them until the issue is settled in 
favor of the seaman's right to secure em- 
l)loymcnt upon his merits, and his right to 
organize as a means to the end of maintain- 
ing his personal freedom. In this determina- 
tion the Lake seamen are sujjported bv the 
."Seafaring craft throughout the United States 
and by all enlightened elements of the press 
and public. 



The Sailors' Union of the Pacific, at its 
meeting at Headquarters on the 27th inst., 
made a second donation of $100 in aid of the 
seamen now on strike in Sweden. In this way 
the Union has given practical expression to 
the .sentiment of comradeship with the .seamen 
of the world which has animated it throughout 
its long career. 



POST AND THE PRESS. 



Demand the union label of the Cigarmak- 
crs and Tobacco Workers when inirchasing 
smf)king materials. 



Our old friend, I\Ir. C. W. Post, has re- 
cently given to the world another of his now 
famous eflfusions on the subject of organized 
labor. Of course, the newspapers are pleased 
to ])ublish Mr. Post's writings — at so much 
per line. It would ajipear, however, that there 
exists here and there a newsjjapcr which de- 
clines to accept the Post articles even at read- 
ing matter rates. This much we gather from 
the Fresno Republican, which paper comments 
upon the situation, as follows: 

The Rci)ublican is in receipt of a note from 
the Grandin Advertising Agency, enclosing a copy 
of a letter from its client, C. W. Post, to the San 
Francisco Bulletin, informing that paper that he 
will boycott it on account of its attitude toward 
the labor unions. The advertising agency sug- 
gests that the Republican reprint the article and 
send marked copies to its advertisers and selected 
readers. 

The Republican cheerfully complies with this 
request, and will give the letter even more prom- 
inence than was probably contemplated. Cer- 
tainly a boycott notice of this sort should be 
given the widest possible publicity, so that if there 
arc other advertisers who think that the editorial 
colunnis of the Bulletin belong to them, they may 
make haste to put in their claims. We note 
among these advertisers some firms whose posi- 
tion on the Union question is the reverse of Mr. 
Post's. Just where the paper would be if they 
should all undertake to edit it at once, we leave 
to some more acrobatic intellect than ours to 
guess. 

Here follows the letter addressed by Post to 
the San Francisco I'ulletin, in which the for- 
mer announces his intention to boycott the 
Hulletin because of its alleged "pandering to 
labor unionism." The Fresno Republican con- 
tinues, as follows : 

Far be it from us to suggest any dissent from 
the conclusions so cogently expressed in this let- 
ter. Mr. Post is a valued advertiser — therefore 
his opinions are ours. Besides, Mr. Post is a pub- 
lic benefactor. He has not only raised the Ameri- 
can breakfast table to the high plane of a gas- 
tronomic laboratory, and saved many a poor 
wretch from a cofTee-drunkard's grave, but he has 
enriched literature by adding one more to its 
small stock of jokes. The breakfast-food joke is 
now almost as staple as the mother-in-law. 
.•\bove all, Mr. Post has invented a product that 
supplies the most universal lack in the world — a 
food that makes brains. No better testimonial to 
the efficacy of that product could be desired than 
the masterful logic of the above letter. Having 
also partaken bountifully of much-needed brain 
food, we have attained to that mental elevation 
so frequently exemplified by talesmen in the Cal- 
houn trial, and whatever a good customer thinks, 
we think too. "There's a reason." 

But has Mr. Post stopped to think that the 
mental deficiency of the editor of the Bulletin, 
which prevents him from comprehending this 
point, is really a valuable adjunct to the value 
of his advertising? Would a maker of dyspepsia 
tablets advertise in the Farm Hand's Own? 
Would a distiller advertise in The Voice? Or a 
brain-food manufacturer in the Philosophic Re- 
view? The conclusive presumption is that if the 
editor of the Bulletin does not agree with Mr. 
Post he has no brains; therefore he needs brain- 
food. But, being brainless himself, he would 
naturally make a paper that would attract brain- 
less readers, and these are the very ones that 
Mr. Post wants to reach, if he is going to sell 
brain food. .Mso, no doubt, if the Bulletin circu- 
lates among the brainless, it must have an enor- 
mous circulation. Therefore if advertising is to 
he determined, like opinions and votes, by busi- 
ness considerations, Mr. Post should not boycott, 
but rather especially favor those mentally defect- 
ive publishers who do not agree with him in his 
industrial and political views. What he is ad- 
vertising is not politics, nor non-unionism, but 
brain food. 

Quite incidentally, we may mention the incom- 
petent, irrelevant and immaterial considerations 
that probably the title deeds of the Bulletin are 
made out in the name of R. A. Crothers, instead 
of C. W, Post; that Mr. Post's advertising con- 
tracts cover considerably less than all the space 
in a paper; that there are misguided persons who 
really believe that the Bulletin is right and Mr. 
Post wrong; and that the freedom of the press 
from either governmental or business coercion is 
precisely the most essential safeguard of free in- 
stitutions. Mr. Post is fighting for the privilege 
of running his own shop in his own way. That 
is exactly the privilege he ought to accord to the 
Bulletin. Tf Mr. Post's brain food is good, and 
the Bulletin can help him sell it, to a population 
which is undoubtedly in crying need of it, that is 
the whole transaction. To Kay that the selling of 
mush shall be determined by considerations of 
large public policy, while the conscience of a 



naper shall be a commercial commodity, thrown 
in as a free premium to advertisers, is to mix 
mush and brains in a way that suggests that some- 
body has switched the cartons. 

Our contemporary treats the matter in the 
only way in which such stuff as that published 
by Post can be treated. Both the Republican 
and the P.ulletin are to be congratulated upon 
their attitude toward Post. Concerning those 
papers which publish the Post stuff it remains 
to be said that the "business instinct" which 
permits them to publish as advertising matter 
sentiments which they would not publish upon 
their own responsibility is very small "busi- 
ness." The fact that the new.spapers are paid 
for publishing this sort of stuff does not lessen 
the responsibility of the press in this connec- 
tion. Newspapers which publish Post's mali- 
cious and stupid attacks upon the labor move- 
ment may justly be held to accountability for 
the sentiments therein expressed. 



ASIATIC IMMIGRATION. 



"Chinese and Japanese in America" is the 
title carried by the current issue of the An- 
nals of the American Academy of Political 
and Social Science. Under this title the 
publication named presents a comprehensive 
treatment of the subject of Asiatic immigra- 
tion as regarded from the three viewpoints, 
namely, of exclusion, of admission, and of 
national and international relations. In ad- 
dition, a number of articles are devoted to 
the "Problem of Oriental Immigration Out- 
side of America." The volume contains 
twenty-three articles and 200 pages. 

The argument in favor of Oriental exclu- 
sion is presented by Chester H. Rowell, John 
P. Young, Walter Macarthur, A. E. Yoell, 
Hon. Albert G. Burnett, Sidney G. P. Coryn 
and Hon. Francis G. Newlands. The argu- 
ment against Oriental exclusion is presented 
by Max J. Kohler, John P. Irish, Rev. 
Thomas L. F-liot and F. G. Young. Discus- 
sing the "National and International Aspects 
of the Exclusion Movement" are the follow- 
ing: William Draper Lewis, Herbert H. 
Gowen, Baron Kentaro Kaneko, Mary Rob- 
erts Coolidge, Chester Lloyd Jones, Marcus 
Braun and James Bronson Reynolds. The 
writers who discuss the subject of Exclusion 
as affecting other countries, notably South 
Africa and Australia, are: Yosaburo Yo- 
shida, Russell McCulloch Story, L. E. 
Xeame, Thomas F. Millard and Philip S. 
I'Udershaw. 

From this list of writers it may be inferred 
that the subject is treated not only compre- 
hensively but authoritatively. Probably in 
no other quarter can there be found a discus- 
sion of the subject equal in all the points es- 
sential to a thorough understanding of it to 
that presented by the .\nnals. Considering 
the im])ortance — the increasing importance 
— of the subject, the great public interest in 
it. and the absence of anything like intelli- 
gible and authentic information concerning 
it which has hitherto prevailed, the Annals 
is to be congratulated upon the present pub- 
lication as in the nature of a great public 
service. The Journal intends to review the 
publication at an early date, and in the mean- 
time recommends a perusal of it by editors, 
publicists, lawmakers and all persons desi- 
rous of securing a comprehensive grasp of 
the subject. It may not be out of place to 
say that the contributions to the .^nnals are 
written without compensation, all receipts 
from the sale of copies being devoted to the 



COAST SEAMEN'S lOURNAL. 



work of the Academy. The Annals may be 
had by addressing the American Academy 
cif Political and Social Science, Philadelphia. 
Price $1.00. 



A JOKE AND A CRIME. 



The best political joke of the season is 
contained in the platform of the Union 
Labor party of San Francisco. Among nu- 
merous pledges and promises, that party 
favors the "fostering of an evening class in 
navigation, which shall be developed into a 
practical school for navigation so that the 
American youth of our city may have ample 
opportunity to qualify for the merchant ma- 
rine." Just what is meant by this it would 
be difficult to say, other than that it is in- 
tended to catch flics- — that is, votes. The 
person who drafted this particular "plank" 
could not explain it in terms either reason- 
able or practical. The statement on its face 
is meaningless and absurd. The "American 
youth," or the youth of any other nationality 
for that matter, does not "qualify for the 
merchant marine" by attending a night 
school. That can only be done by going to 
sea and "learning the ropes." This prelimi- 
nary observed, the business of "learning 
navigation" may be attended to. The Union 
Labor party suggests a reversal of the nat- 
ural order of things, and would make the 
American youth a navigator before he has 
become a seaman. However, difificult as this 
feat would appear, it is only one of the nu- 
merous feats, each as difificult and apparently 
impossible, which that party promises to 
perform if given "another chance." 

To attempt to discuss this or any other 
feature of the Union Labor platform would 
be as vain as an attempt to discuss the se- 
crets of legerdemain. The whole thing is so 
much trickery. It remains to be said that 
the platform of the Union Labor party is 
the grossest piece of political effrontery ever 
perpetrated upon a community. In language 
it is vague and verbose ; in meaning, so far 
as any meaning may be seen, it is a blunt 
and disgraceful appeal to the narrowest, 
most selfish and most corrupt elements. 
Throughout a mass of verbiage not a single 
sentiment of forthright honesty is expressed, 
not the slightest suspicion of concern for 
labor or for the citizenship at large is evi- 
denced. The whole thing is a sordid, selfish 
low-down appeal to the "merchant and busi- 
ness man," the "legitimate ( !) liquor traffic" 
and the "taxpayer." By its own declara- 
tions the party is on record as evading every 
important issue now before the people, and 
as favoring a "business administration along 
legitimate liberal lines," which, being trans- 
lated into plain English, means an adminis- 
tration along lines agreeable to the interests 
of the underworld. 

As a political document, the platform of 
the Union Labor party is beneath contempt ; 
as an expression of the sentiments of labor 
it is an insult and a crime. 



There is one way in which every member 
of organized labor and every friend of labor 
may aid the Hatters in bringing to a final close 
the long fight which they have waged for the 
maintenance of their organization and the 
principles of the labor movement at large. 
That is by demanding the Hatters' label when 
purchasing a hat. 



OHIO'S CREW COMPLIMENTED. 



The investigation into the wreck of the 
steamer Ohio was concluded at Seattle on the 
18th inst. The Inspectors, after giving their 
findings as to the cause and location of the 
wreck, completely exonerated Captain John- 
son, Pilot Snow and the crew from all re- 
.sponsibility for the wreck upon the ground 
that the reef upon which the Ohio stranded 
was not marked on the charts. Concerning 
the conduct of the Ohio's officers and crew 
subsequent to the wreck, the Inspectors say : 

While tlie vessel was being taken to Carter Bay 
with all possible dispatch, the lifeboats were 
swung out and lowered to the rail; passengers 
were called, life belts distributed and everything 
made ready to abandon ship. The best of disci- 
pline prevailed among both passengers and crew. 
The stern of the vessel sank about ten minutes 
after her bow was run on the beach. Four per- 
sons lost their lives; Mr. Hayes, a passenger; Mr. 
Eccles, wireless operator; Mr. Stevens, purser; 
Mr. Andreason, quartermaster. It is not known 
definitely how Hays and Mr. Stevens lost their 
lives. Mr. Eccles was killed in some manner un- 
known and there is no doubt that Andreason, 
quartermaster, lost his life trying to save some 
one whom he heard calling for help. 

We believe that Captain Johnson, in his deter- 
mination to beach his ship, and the manner in 
which he accomplished the feat, displayed excel- 
lent judgment and skill, which, together with the 
discipline and energy of officers and crew, pre- 
vented a great loss of life. After a careful con- 
sideration of all the facts in this case we are of 
the opinion that Captain Johnson or any of his 
officers should not be held at fault and they are 
hereby exonerated. 

This recognition of the conduct of the 
Ohio's crew is timely and well deserved. The 
whole case illustrates again the well-estab- 
lished truth that the danger to life in event of 
shipwreck is reduced to the minimum by the 
|)resencc of a sufficient and efficient crew of 



(iovernor (Jillett, of California, has com- 
muted the death sentence of William Buckley 
to fifteen years' imprisonment. Buckley was 
convicted of murder growing out of the San 
Francisco Iron Trades strike of 1901, but it 
was afterward demonstrated that he did not 
actually commit the crime in question. Upon 
the presentation of proof to this effect. Gov- 
ernor Gillctt extended Executive clemency, for 
which act he is to be commended. It is prob- 
able that Buckley will shortly be paroled and 
later pardoned. Thus justice will be done, 
and the State saved from the stain of inflict- 
ing the extreme penalty upon an innocent man. 



Organized labor differs with President Taft, 
and with very good reason. Nevertheless, no 
class will welcome the President on his travels 
with more sincere respect than the members 
of the labor movement. However we may 
differ with Mr. Taft, we honor President 
Taft, and in so doing honor ourselves and our 
country. 



A labor fair will be held in San k'rancisco 
during "Portola" week (October 19-23) for 
the purpose of creating a fund to build a 
Labor Tenii)le. The fair will be held under 
the auspices of the San Francisco Labor Coun- 
cil and will doubtless be well supported by 
the members of organized labor. 



While the JorKXAi., unlike nio.st other pub- 
lications, is not dependent upon its "business 
end," it recognizes those who advertise in it 
as its friends. The same may be said con- 
cerning the JotRNAL readers. With this in- 
troduction it would seem that nothing more 
need be said. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 27, 1909. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7:30 p. m., P. Scharrenberg presiding. Secre- 
tary reported shipping medium. A second dona- 
lion of $100 was made to the striking seamen of 
Sweden. A Quarterly Finance Committee was 
elected. The following were elected delegates to 
the convention of the California State Federation 
of Labor: F. H. Buryeson, J. W. Erickson, Jos. 
T. Liddy, P. Scharrenberg, A. Seaman and A. 
Thomal. Thomas Monaghan, No. 1670, was ex- 
pelled from the Union for scabbing. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 
44-46 East St., Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Agency, Sept. 20, 1909. 
Situation unchanged. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 20. 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping rather dull; 
prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 20, 1909. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western .\ve. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 20, 1909. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
2291/^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 20, 1909. 
Shipping fairly good; prospects uncertain. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 62. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Sept. 20, 1909. 
Sliipping good. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 19, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping good; pros 
pects uncertain. 

JOFIN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel, Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 20, 1909. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 14, 1909. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 23, 1909. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slack. 

EUGENE STETDLE, Secretary. 

Plionc Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 16, 1909. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. Phone Sun Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 16, 1909. 
No meeting. Shipping medium: prospects poor. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Hea(l(|narters, Chicago, Sept. 20. 1909. 
.Strike situation good. 

V. A. OLANDER. Secretary. 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 21, 1909. 
Shipping and prospects good. 

PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary pro tern. 
l^^A Lewis St. 



DIED. 

Patrick Flynn, No. 350. a native of Ireland, 
aged 30, died at Seattle, Wash., on Sept. 20, 1909. 

Nicolas Koskinen. No. 598, a native of Finland, 
aged 58, died at San Francisco, Cal., on Sept. 27, 
1909. 

Notice: The announcement of the death of 
Vincent Chevalier, publislied in a recent issue, 
was due to misinformation. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^^^^ 



ON THB GREAT LAKES, 



(Contribuled by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



^^ 



NEW PASSENGER STEAMER. 



Another up-to-date steamer will be added 
to the Lake Erie passenger fleet next season. 
T. F. Newman, President of the Lake Erie 
Excursion Company, has closed a contract 
with the American Shipbuilding Company 
for a steamer to be an exact duplicate of the 
Americana. She will be completed by June 
15, 1910. 

The new boat, with the Americana, will 
be t)i3erated between FiufTalo and Crystal 
Beach. The Americana is considered by her 
owners and experts a perfect ship for the 
route she is on. The steamer has capacity 
for 4,000 passengers. 

The new steamer will be 210 feet long, 45 
feet molded beam, 58 feet over the guards. 
and 15 feet 9 inches deep. She will have 
triple expansion engines with cylinders 20, 32 
and 50 inches, with 36-inch stroke. Steam 
will be furnished by two Scotch boilers 13 
feet 2 inches in diameter and 12 feet long. 
The boilers will be fitted with the Ellis & 
Eaves induced draft. 

The steamer will be built at the Hufifalo 
yard of the American Shipbuilding Com- 
pany. The Americana, which came out in 
1908, was built at the same yard. 

Four vessels to cost about $1,000,000 have 
been ordered during the recent past for 1910 
delivery. Three of the ships are freighters 
and will be built by the Great Lakes Engi- 
neering works of Detroit for the Northern 
Lakes Steamship Company. 



BOUGHT TWO BARGES. 



Garry Brothers of Bay City, Mich., have 
purchased the barges N. C. Holland and 
Theodore S. Fassett from the Tonawanda 
Iron & Steel Company. The boats were 
a part of the fleet which the locjil company 
has operated for many years. This spring 
the fleet was placed in ordinary at North 
"I'onawanda and larger ore carriers chartered 
from the Tomlinson, Davidson and Gilchrist 
fleets. 

The Fassett cleared on September 9 for 
Buffalo light. The Holland will follow. 
Both will load coal and in tow of the 
steamer Robert Holland, owned by the 
Garry Brothers, will go to the Georgian Bay 
district. During the balance of the season 
the Holland and barges will carry lumber 
from that section of Canada to the docks of 
White, Frost & White in North Tonawanda. 
J. H. Trude has been placed in command of 
the Fassett. 

It is reported that negotiations are pend- 
ing for a purchase of a number of other 
boats in the local company's fleet, among 
them being the steamer Curtis. 



According to a dispatch from Houghton. 
Mich., a new pasSenger dock will be con- 
structed and operated by the city adminis- 
tration of that port. It will be ready for 
use by the opening of navigation next sea- 
son. It is the intention to make the dock 
one of the best of its kind in that section of 
the countrv. 



MORE WHITEWASH. 



Although finding that the action of Mil- 
waukee inspectors in revoking the licenses of 
John Murnan and Richard Thiele, formerly 
engineers on the steamer Kearsarge, was 
justifiable, C. H. Westcott, Detroit, Super- 
vising Inspector, has modified the decisions. 

The two men lost their licenses as the 
result of the "burning up" of a boiler on 
the Kearsarge, of the Canada-Atlantic line. 
The modified decision suspends the license 
of Murnan for four months and that of 
Thiele for forty-five days from July 21, 
when their licenses were revoked. 

.After a length}' and exhaustive examina- 
tion, the Milwaukee inspectors revoked the 
licenses under section 4441 R. S., which 
says licenses must be revoked if any engi- 
neer is found guilty of negligence in con- 
nection with the destruction of a boiler. 

In his modified decision. Supervisor 
Westcott says the inspectors were justified 
in doing what they did and could not do 
otherwise, yet he says, in his belief, the of- 
fen.se was not done intentionally and that 
a term of suspension shorter than the revo- 
cation of the licenses would be as efTectual 
in the matter of discipline in the service. 

He also says that in his opinion the 
two engineers were extremely negligent. 



FOUR NEW FREIGHTERS. 



J. C. Wallace, president of the American 
Shipbuilding Company, has closed a deal 
with "Southern furnace interests" for four 
l)ig steel freight steamers, all of them to 
be delivered by the opening of the season of 
navigation next year. He refused to name 
the persons who had ordered the ships. 

Three of the new steamers will be of the 
following dimensions: Length, 524 feet; 
beam, 54 feet and 30 feet depth. They will 
have triple expansion engines with cylinders 
23 >4, 38 and 63 and 42-inch stroke. They 
will have Scotch boilers 14-6 by 11-6. The 
fourth ship will be 545 feet long by 58 feet 
beam and 31 feet deep, with triple expansion 
engines 23 >4, 38, 63 and 42-inch stroke. She 
will have Scotch boilers 15 feet by 11^. 

These steamers will be of modern con- 
struction, and the four will cost $1,300,000. 
It is probable that two of them will be built 
at the Globe yards in Cleveland, and the 
other two at the Lorain vards. 



TWO NEW FISH TUGS. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



The fish tug which John Bateman is 
I)uil(ling at Buffalo was launched on Septem- 
ber 10. The boat is for Reger & Werner 
of Lorain, O. The work of finishing the 
craft and fitting her out for delivery on 
October 1, according to contract, will be 
completed at the wharf where she is 
laimchcd. The tug is seventy-five feet long, 
sixteen feet beam and draws seven feet of 
water. Mr. Bateman has laid the keel for 
another seventy-five-foot fish tug, to be 
launched on October 20, for the Ranney 
ImsIi Company of Cleveland. The frames 
are all made and will be in place by the 
end of the week. 



MORE FREIGHTERS ORDERED. 



A deal for three new freight steamers that 
has been on for some time was closed re- 
cently. The order for the new ships, which 
will have a carrying capacity of about 8,300 
tons each, was placed by Cleveland parties 
and the boats will be handled there. 

The new freighters, which will be built 
by the Great Lakes Engineering Works of 
Detroit, will come out at the opening of 
next season. They will probably be built 
at the Ecorse yard. 

The new boats will be 464 feet over all, 
444 feet keel, 56 feet beam and 30 feet deep. 
They will have triple expansion engines and 
Scotch boilers. 

A new company will be organized to 
operate the ships. This order makes four 
vessels that the Great Lakes Engineering 
Works has under contract for 1910 delivery. 
The other steamer is a package freighter for 
the Mutual Transit Company of Buffalo. 
She will have a carrying capacity of 5,000 
tons. 



THREE VESSELS GROUNDED. 



Three Cleveland ships went aground on 
the Great Lakes on August 28, and wreck- 
ing tugs were at once dispatched to their as- 
sistance. The steamer Sir William Siemens 
and barge Smeaton, of the Pittsburg Steam- 
ship Company's fleet, went on just below 
"the cut" in Lake St. Clair. Both were 
loaded with ore, and were bound down to 
Lake Erie with their cargoes. It was be- 
lieved that it would be necessary to lighter 
them before they could be released. 

The steamer C. A. Eddy, of the Gilchrist 
line, while en route to Lake Erie with a 
cargo of ore, sprang a leak just north of St. 
Martin's Island in Green Bay, and in order 
to prevent her going to the bottom the cap- 
tain beached her. The Great Lakes Towing 
Company sent a steam pump and tug to the 
boat's assistance. She is in a dangerous 
position, especially in case a bad blow should 
spring up. 



PLOUGHBOYS STILL PLOUGHING. 



It is believed at Detroit that the ground- 
ings at the St. Clair flats ship canal are 
caused by "humps" which have been thrown 
up in the channel or close to it by vessels 
that have stuck and have worked their 
wheels in releasing themselves. Several have 
been aground there in the last two weeks 
and have not called for a tug in getting 
off. 

Say, comrades, this is good ! They can't 
keep the farmers from ploughing, can they? 
Take them out of the field and put on a ves- 
sel and they plough the banks with her ! 
Ploughboys, go to it ! 



The officials of the Northwestern Railroad 
Company at Escanaba have voted to a])- 
propriate $1,000,000 for the reopening of the 
ore dock, which recently collapsed at that 
p(»rt. Work on the new dock will be begun 
shortly. According to the plans formulated 
by the officials it will surpass the old dock 
in equipment and general facilities. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ACCIDENT TO SEAMAN. 



It is provided by the Act that in fixing 
the amount of the weekly payment, regard 
shall be had to any payment, allowance or 
benefit which the workman may receive 
from the employer during the period of his 
incapacity. The Act applies to seamen, 
where a seaman is injured in the course of 
his employment. In the case of seamen a 
weekly payment is not payable in respect of 
a period during which the shipowner has 
under the IMerchant Shipping .Acts been lia- 
ble to defray the expenses of maintenance of 
the injured man. Where a seaman is dis- 
charged at a foreign port before the termi- 
nation of the voyage because of his unfitness 
through sickness or injury to do his work, 
the shipowners are 1:)ound under the same 
Acts to provide for the necessary mainte- 
nance and medical treatment of the man, and 
to defray the expenses of his journey home. 
By the same Acts also shipowners are 
bound to pay a seaman his wages up to the 
(late of his discharge. 

A seaman engaged to serve on a ship for 
a voyage not exceeding three years from 
October, 1908. On December 21st, 1908, he 
was injured by an accident on board while 
the ship was at sea. On December 29th the 
ship was at New York, and on that day the 
man was discharged, his wages being paid 
in full, and he was taken to an hospital 
where he remained a considerable time. 
vSubsequently he was sent back to the Unit- 
ed Kingdom, arriving March 11th, 1909. 
The shipowners paid all expenses incidental 
to his hospital treatment, maintenance, and 
return home. The seaman then brought a 
claim for compensation under the Act 
against the shipowners. When the matter 
came before the County Court judge there 
was no dispute as to facts, and the only 
contention was as to whether in computing 
the compensation the judge should have re- 
gard to the fact that full wages were paid 
to the seaman for the period from Decem- 
ber 21st to 29th. The judge refused to have 
regard to the wages paid during that period. 
The shipowners appealed. 

The Court of Appeal held that under the 
Act regard must be had to payments made 
after the accident, whether those payments 
are voluntary or not, and that the fact of 
such payments must not be overlooked, 
though the judge has discretion how they 
are to be regarded. In this case, therefore, 
the judge was bound to have regard to the 
fact that wages had been paid to the in- 
jured man for the period from December 
21st to 29th, even though such wages were 
paid under a statutory obligation. The ap- 
peal was therefore allowed and the case 
sent back to the judge to assess compensa- 
tion on a proper basis. — McDermott vs. 
Owners of S. S. Tintoretto, Court of Ap- 
peal, July 2nd, 1909. 



ACCIDENTS IN BELGIAN MINES. 



While coal is mined at a greater depth 
in Belgium than in most countries, the 
number of miners killed in accidents is less 
in that country than in any other mining 
locality. For the ten-year period from 1891 
to 1900 the number of fatalities 'per 10,000 
workmen was 16.84 per annum. In the me- 
tallic-ore mines the number of workmen 
who have been killed by accident is one- 
third that in the coal mines. 



WHO IS A "SEAMAN"? 



The Employers' Liability Act, 1880, ap- 
plies to railway servants' and to any person 
to whom the Workmen and Employers Act, 
187.1, applies. The last mentioned Act does 
not apply to seamen. The term "seaman" 
was defined by the Merchant Shipping Act, 
1854, to "include every person employed or 
engaged in any capacity on board any ship." 
The Merchant Shipping .Act, 1894, has the 
same definition. 

.\ man employed as a "rigger" by a firm 
of shipowners was working on board a ship 
lying in a dock. While he and four other.'-" 
were engaged in war]:)ing the ship from one 
berth to another across the dock he was in- 
jured by accident. The duty in which he 
was engaged when injured consisted in 
moving the vessel by means of a tug and a 
rope, she at no time being entirely free from 
tlic quay, and at no time using her own 
steam or any motive power of her own. 

The injured man brought an action for 
damages under the Act against his em])loy- 
ers. At the trial of the action it was con- 
tended on behalf of the employers that the 
plaintiff was a seaman and therefore not en- 
titled to bring the action. The County 
Court judge, however, gave judgment for 
the plaintiff. The defendants appealed. It 
was held by the High Court that the Coun- 
ty Court judge was wrong; that the plain- 
tifif was a "seaman" within the definition in 
the Merchant Shipping Acts, and as such 
had no right to bring an action under the 
Act. The plaintifif appealed to the Court 
of Appeal. 

The Court of Appeal held that the so- 
called definition of "seaman" in the Act of 
18.54 was no proper or true definition as it 
used the word "include" not "meaning," and 
further that it was not to be read into the 
Act of 1880. In the last mentioned Act, 
"seaman" bore its ordinary meaning and did 
not include a man like the plaintiff who was 
employed in a casual and temporary em- 
ployment in dock and not while the vessel 
was being navigated. Therefore the High 
Court was wrong and the County Court was 
right. The Appeal was accordingly al- 
lowed. — Chislett vs. Macbeth & Co., Court 
of Appeal, July 22, 1909. 



SAGAMORE AT IT AGAIN. 



The steel barge Sagamore appears de- 
termined to keep pace with the steel steamer 
George L. Craig in the number of accidents 
caused by bad handling. On September 3, 
while being towed from the shipyard at To- 
ledo, where she had been undergoing exten- 
sive repairs, incident to her stranding at 
Eagle River several weeks previously, the 
Sagamore struck the barge Hartnell and did 
considerable damage to both vessels. The 
Sagamore was returned to the shipyard. 

Vessels manned by "gee-haw" sailors need 
plenty of room evidently. 



The deepest bore ever made into the 
earth's surface for industrial purposes is said 
to be the Buyer oil well at Ronchamp, 
France, which reaches a depth of 3310 feet. 



Several of the smaller Michigan cities are 
experimenting with street lighting by hang- 
ing arches of tungsten lamps across the 
highways from the eaves of buildings. 



HEAVING THE LEAD. 



The following incident, which happened 
on the steamer Ericsson, ofif Fairport re- 
cently, illustrates the character of the "sea- 
men" employed by the Lake Carriers' As- 
sociation. The master of the Ericsson told 
the watchman to "heave the lead." The 
latter, not knowing what was meant, started 
to look around, when the master said : 

"There it is, right alongside of you. Get 
it over the side." 

Thereupon the watchman picked up ihe 
lead and forty feet of line, and threw both 
overboard! He is now looking for another 
j(jb. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frank Donnelly is inquired for by his 
mother, Mrs. Eva Donnelly, 1317 Clark St., 
Racine, Wis. 



Wm. A. Nichol.son, No. 13,156, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his sister. Miss 
.Mice Nicholson, 356 Lake street, Oak Park, 

111. 



L. P\ Sweeney, No. 3132, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is anxiously inquired for by his 
family. Address K. Murphy, 541 North 
Clark street, Chicago, Ills. 



Fred Smith, No. 9872, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is wanted by his mother, at BuflFalo, 
N. Y. Any one knowing his address please 
communicate with W. L. Smith, 55 Main 
St., Bufifalo, N. Y. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Teleplione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 H. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR. 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Bell Phone East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, Wis 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, Ont.. Canada Box 235 

KINGSTON, Ont.. Canada (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES: 

MANITOWOC, Wis 725 Quay Street 

ERIE Pa 305 French Street 

Telephone Bell 682. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 

HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITBl^ STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELI'EP STATIONS. 



Asliland, Wis. 
Ashtal)ula Harbor, O. 
RufCalo, N. Y. 
Diiluth, Minn. 
IOs".-Ml:lli:l. Midi. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Grcon Bay. Mich, 
llougliton, Mich. 
I,uilin"-'.on. Mich. 
Mai.i.stee, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
IMnniuette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, ivllch. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WAGES IN BELGIUM. 



Up to the present time Belgium enjoyed 
special advantages, which enabled her to 
compete successfully with the leading in- 
dustrial nations of the world, owing to the 
fact that employers in all lines of industry 
were able to obtain an adequate supply of 
workmen at salaries decidedly lower than 
those current in other industrial countries. 
According to the latest reports, however, 
this advantageous state of affairs is not des- 
tined to continue for an indefinite period in 
this country, as the marked Increase in the 
cost of living that has been more or less 
general throughout the world has been espe- 
cially exemplified in the case of Belgium. 

Belgium has heretofore been classed as a 
low-priced country, and the low cost of liv- 
ing has been an element that has attracted 
to the country quite a large class of foreign- 
ers, who were enabled to live almost luxu- 
riously on modest incomes that in other 
countries would have been barely sufficient 
to cover absolute necessities. 

A marked increase in wages has lately 
been manifested in nearly all the lines of 
industrial activity, and further increases are 
undoubtedly destined to be accorded in the 
near future, as, with wages such as have 
been paid in the past, it is deemed impossi- 
ble for a workman to house and feed an av- 
erage family in an adequate manner, and 
in accordance with the standard of living 
prevailing among the working classes of 
this country. 

A case in point that may be cited as illus- 
trative of the tendency to demand increased 
wages, is the recent action taken by the un- 
ion of house-painters of this locality. .After 
various isolated and futile attempts on the 
part of individual workmen to obtain from 
their employers an increase of wage, the 
union fSyndicat des Ouvriers Peintres) ad- 
dressed an open letter to the population of 
this district and to the Association of Mas- 
ter Painters (Association des Patrons- 
Peintres). In this letter is stated that, in 
view of the unfortunate situation in which 
the house-painters are placed, owing to in- 
sufficient wages and long periods of enforced 
idleness taking place during the winter, they 
decided to address the Association of Mas- 
ter Painters of Liege in order to set forth 
their grievances, and, in common, to en- 
deavor to discover means for remedying the 
same. 

The situation of the Liege house-painters, 
it is asserted, is at present far from envia- 
ble, their wages being from 35 to 38 cen- 
times (100 centimes:=l franc=:19.3 cents") 
an hour, and in certain ca.ses no more than 
33 centimes an hour. The daj''s work varies 
throughout the year from 7 to 11 hours, de- 
pending upon the season. Working, there- 
fore, for a period of 275 days, which is the 
average number possible during a year, tak- 
ing into consideration lioIidaA'S and periods 
of enforced idleness, at the rate of 36 and 38 
centimes an hour, with an average day's 
work of 9 hours, a house-painter is enabled 
to earn the sum of 891 francs in case of the 
former rate, and 940.5 francs in the case of 
the latter; that is, a sum of $171.96 to 
$181.52. This, of course, according to the 
American standard, seems almost ridiculous, 
but even taking into account the different 
scale of wages existing in Belgium, it is far 
below what could legitimately be claimed as 
necessary. On petition of the workmen's 



association in October, 1907, the city of 
Liege advanced the wages of the painters 
employed by the municipality to 45 cen- 
times an hour. 

The communication states that taking 
into consideration the present increased cost 
of the necessities of life for a family, say, of 
four persons (rent, food, clothes, heating, 
etc.), it is easily seen what an arduous 
struggle for existence such a workman's life 
must become, without taking into considera- 
tion the diseases that are known to be preva- 
lent among workers in this trade, such as 
painter's colic, lead poisoning, etc., as well 
as the dangers from accidents to which 
painters are continually exposed in carrying 
on their work. It is also claimed that good 
house-painters are every day becoming 
more difficult to find, as the best workers 
in the trade are abandoning this work in 
order to seek higher wages in other trades, 
in the hope of earning enough to sustain 
their families and to prevent their becom- 
ing objects of public charity. 

The syndicate closes its letter by an ur- 
gent appeal to the population of the prov- 
ince to assist them in procuring a satisfac- 
tory solution of a problem of such vital in- 
terest, both to themselves and to the com- 
munity at large. 



WORLD'S LONGEST RAILROAD. 



If the Cape-to-Cairo railroad is completed 
— and it is more than half finished now — 
the world's longest railroad will be in Afri- 
ca, declares the Baltimore Sun. Then the 
man who has a passion for girdling the globe 
will have a new interest in life. In eleven 
days after he begins the journey in a luxuri- 
ously appointed vestibuled train from Cairo 
he will arrive, if all goes well, in Cape Town, 
South Africa, a distance approximately 6000 
miles from his starting point in Egypt. In 
about three years, it is estimated, the Cape- 
to-Cairo trunk line will be in operation. But 
there is a stretch of 2500 miles between 
Khartoum, in the Egyptian Soudan, and 
Broken Hill, the present terminus of the rail- 
road in Rhodesia, on which not a mile of 
track has j^et been laid. 

The estimated cost of completing the 
Cape-to-Cairo railroad is $1,000,000,000. The 
financial problem seems to present more dif- 
ficulties than the engineering. South Africa 
has vast treasures of gold and precious 
stones and the men who control its mineral 
wealth are the dominant influence in the 
syndicate organized to complete the long 
connecting link of 2500 miles between Khar- 
toum and Broken Hill. That this railroad, 
traversing Africa from north to south, will 
be a profitable enterprise in a business sense 
is doubtful. But it appeals to the imagina- 
tion of many Britons who are imbued with 
the imperial spirit. This stupendous project 
was the conception of Cecil Rhodes, who 
died in 1902, when the accomplishment of 
his project seemed very remote, if it should 
ever be consummated. It is doubtful wheth- 
er Mr. Roosevelt will find in all Africa any- 
thing more interesting and edifying than the 
extraordinary railroad development which 
Cecil Rhodes inspired. 



The Chinese Board of .Agriculture, In- 
dustry and Commerce has been granted 
leave to establish a factory to manufacture 
authentic weights and measures for uni- 
form use throughout the Empire of China. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free te.xt books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the clas.s of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to !>■ -1\ 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

"iNTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Contin\ied from Page 5.) 

PACrFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOXrVER, B. C, 122 Alexander St., P. O. Box 
1365. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Qulncy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

.\BERDEEN, W^ash., P. O. Box 62. 

PORTLAND, Dr., 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

.'SVN rKDUO, Cal.. P. O. Box fi7. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE. Wash., Hiisu Western Ave., P. O. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SE.\TTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 13S. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box fi. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBTTRO. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. <»3 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St, 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be proo\ired by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OP AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



BRITISH LABOR CONDITIONS. 



Trade disputes involving more industries 
and larger numbers of men have occurred in 
1008 than in any year for a decade. The finan- 
cial crisis in the United States in the late au- 
tumn of 1907 was followed by a widespread 
trade depression, which affected the United 
Kingdom and the continent of Europe. With 
the fall in values came lessened production, a 
smaller demand for labor, and a reduction of 
wages. 

The principal lalxjr disputes of the year have 
been caused by the resistance of men to the en- 
forcement of wage reductions, but the stop- 
]:)ages, coming on a falling market and at the 
time when large stocks were on hand, ended 
disastrously for the men. From January 1 to 
November 30 there occurred 367 trade dis- 
putes, in which 297,854 workmen were in- 
volved, with an aggregate loss of 10,506,600 
working days. In the same period of 1907 
there were 508 disputes, involving 137,142 
work people and an aggregate loss of 1,978,100 
working days. Consequently, the number of 
men affected has been doubled and the loss of 
working days has gone up by more than 500 
per cent. The loss in wages alone is calculated 
to amount to $15,000,000. The funds of the 
trades federation and the trade-union con- 
cerned have been depleted, and after the loss 
and suffering entailed by a stoppage, the reduc- 
tions have had to be accepted. 

The injury to trade and the loss and suffer- 
ing involved by the labor disputes which have 
occurred during the year have caused the 
Board of Trade to form a court of arbitration 
for the consideration and, it is hoped, averting 
of labo-r disputes. The services of the most 
distinguished public men, captains of industry, 
and most sagacious labor leaders have been en- 
listed. These men will doubtless command 
public confidence and respect. There is much 
to be hoped from the development of arbitra- 
tion courts and conciliation boards in removing 
causes of dift'erence and averting labor dis- 
putes. 

The most prolonged and serious dispute of 
the year has been in the shipbuilding and en- 
gineering trades of the northeast coast. For 
seven months this dispute was continued, caus- 
ing dislocation of trade and serious loss in 
wages to the men. The men returned to work 
on September 24, accepting the reduction of 
wages with the understanding that no further 
alteration in wages take place for six months 
from the resumption of work. The loss in 
trade and wages by the dispute must have run 
up to several million pounds sterling. 

The dispute in the cotton trade was of short- 
er duration, but it directly involved a much 
larger number of work people. The boom in 
cotton has been responsible for a good deal of 
mill building and increase of production, with 
the inevitable result of large stocks accumu- 
lated on a falling market. The Master Cotton 
Spinners' Association on July 24 decided to 
ask for a reduction of 5 per cent in wages. It 
was decided, after some negotiations, to post- 
pone the reduction until the new year. To this 
the spinners agreed, but their decision was 
rendered valueless by the refusal to accept on 
the part of the car<l-room operatives. On Sep- 
tember 21 the federated employers closed their 
mills, and about 120,000 operatives were ren- 
dered idle, besides the injurious effect exer- 
cised on other industries. The stoppage con- 
tinued until November 9, a period of seven 
weeks, when an agreement was signed for the 



operatives to resume work. The agreement 
provides for a 5 per cent reduction of wages, 
to come into effect on the first day in March. 
The only result which the operatives obtained 
for the seven weeks' stoppage and the loss of 
$5,000,000 in wages was the delaying of the 5 
per cent reduction in wages from the first day 
of January to the first day of March. The em- 
ployers received very substantial compensation 
for the delay in the reduction of wages in the 
clearing of stocks and the placing of the trade 
on a better basis to meet any improvement in 
the demand. 

The miners have continued to receive high 
wages throughout the year, though there lias 
been a drop from the boom prices of 1907. In 
the federated districts in England the coal 
owners gave notice of a reduction of 5 per cent 
in wages in July, which was resisted by the 
men, but on the application going before Lord 
James, on September 3, he gave his casting" 
vote for the reduction asked for by the coal 
owners. The Scottish miners have suffered a 
reduction of 12j/^ per cent, and Northumber- 
land and Durham have also had reductions. In 
the English federated districts wages are now 
55 per cent above the standard wage and with- 
in 5 per cent of the maximum, in Durham 44 >4 
per cent above the standard, and in Northum- 
berland 41^4 Pci" cent above the standard. In 
the closing days of the autumn session of Par- 
liament the miners' Eight-Hour bill was passed 
into law. The agitation on the part of the 
miners has l:)cen for an eight-hour day from 
bank to bank. The bill legalizes an eight-hour 
working day, or, counting the two windings, 
nearly nine hours from bank to bank. The new 
Act, when it comes into law in Northumber- 
land and Durham in January, 1910, and in 
other mining districts in July, 1909, will make 
a considerable change in the working condi- 
tions of the industry. 

Toward the close of the year a small im- 
provement in trade has set in, with a slight de- 
crease in unemployment. In November the re- 
turns from trade unions with 644,770 mem- 
bers, showed that 9.1 per cent were unem- 
ployed, as compared with 9.5 per cent in Oc- 
tober. It is hoped that these favorable indica- 
tions of improvement will be confirmed with 
the new year. 



RATSKIN INDUSTRY. 



ANTWERP'S SHIPPING INTERESTS. 



The use of rat skins in various industries 
has created a demand in London alone to 
the amount of nearly $200,000 a year, states 
a British publication. They are used among 
other things for bookbinding, photograph 
frames, purses, and for the thumbs of ladies' 
gloves. A new branch of work is likely to 
increase the consumption largely, and as 
much as 75 to 90 cents a day have been 
earned by the unemployed in Denmark last 
year, when the Rat Act was passed. The 
damage done by rats in England alone is 
estimated to amount to many million dollars 
per annum, and their capture already occu- 
pies a large number of persons. 



The 682-pound Guffey meteorite, found 
near the Colorado town of that name in 
1907, has been acquired by the American 
Museum of Natural History at New York. 



The residue rejected by Greeks who 
smelted lead where it was mined as far back 
as 500 B. C. is being worked over to-day by 
modern methods. 



At the close of 1908 the Antwerp Chamber 
of Commerce numbered 1,214 members -and 
34 sections, each section being interested in a 
particular phase of work which concerns the 
commercial welfare of the port. 

The Antwerp Chamber of Commerce was 
instrumental in inducing both chambers of the 
pjelgian Parliament to vote the new maritime 
law and the new law of maritime mortgages. 
Again, in order to expedite judicial proceed- 
ings, it prevailed upon the Government to 
create a second court of the Antwerp Tribunal 
of Commerce. 

The Chamber induced the Government to 
enter into negotiation with the Dutch Govern- 
ment for the better lighting of the River 
Scheldt, to enable large ships to navigate the 
river at night. It also persuaded the city au- 
thorities to install the 50-ton electric crane at 
the south quays, which has greatly facilitated 
the manipulation of cargoes. A commission 
has been appointed, composed of delegates 
from the Government, from the city, and the 
Chamber of Commerce, to provide ways and 
means for assuring the safety of merchandise 
lying in the port. Acting upon the advice of 
the Chamber of Commerce, the Belgian Gov- 
ernment has decided to allow the payment of 
duties upon the lumber destroyed by the great 
fire of 1907 until the passing of the proposed 
law providing for the exemption of this lum- 
ber. A commission has been appointed in 
the Chamber to prepare a bill for the unifica- 
tion of the diamond carat at 200 milligrams. 

The Chamber also has the following lines 
of work under consideration : Increase of 
the export trade ; an official load line for 
steamers ; the development of Belgian ca- 
nals ; providing the harbor with floating 
grain elevators, preparing a bill for the ad- 
justment of liquor licenses, etc. The work 
accomplished and the work in view is of such 
a nature as to have great influence upon the 
municipal, provincial, and general govern- 
ments. The Antwerp Chamber of Com- 
merce, composed as it is of the leading repre- 
sentatives of all branches of commerce, is 
the most influential semi-official or private 
body of this country. 

The total tonnage entered at the port of 
Antwerp during 1908 was 11,054,269 tons, as 
against 11,181,226 tons in 1907, showing a 
decrease of 126,957 tons, due to the trade 
conditions of the past twelve months. How- 
ever, as compared with other ports which 
have suffered from the depression, Antwerp 
has held its own in spite of the unfortunate 
strike of dock laborers which immediately 
preceded the financial crisis in 1907. The 
following will show the total tonnage enter- 
ing this port during the i)ast six years : 1903, 
9.064,662: 1904,9.385,267; 190.5,9,900,305; 
1906, 10,884,412; 1907, 11,181,226; 1908, 11,- 
054,269. 

During 1907 and 1908 the port of Antwerp 
was visited by 6,284 and 6,135 vessels, re- 
spectively; during the same time the port of 
Rotterdam was visited by 9,873 and 8,811 
vessels, respectively, with a total tonnage of 
10,547,24f) and 9,469,153 tons, respectively. 
while Hamburg was visited by 16,473 and 
16,8v30 vessels, respectively, with a total ton- 
nage of 12,040,000 and 11,914,000 tons, re- 
spectively. 



Dv:mand the Hatters' label when buying a 
hat. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




An carthc|uake occurred at Granada, 
Spain, on September 18, causing great 
.alarm, but, so far as is known, no 
damage was done. 

Torrential rains have caused the loss 
of one hundred lives and the destruc- 
tion of five hundred houses at Horns, 
a town in Northern Syria. 

The Netherlands Financial Depart- 
ment has submitted to tlie State Coun- 
cil a bill providing for an increase 
of 30 per cent on all import duties. 

Robert Hoe, head of Robert Hoe & 
Co., printing press manufacturers of 
New York and London, died at Lon- 
don, Eng., on September 22, aged 70 
years. 

Southern l-'rance. especially Pro- 
vence, was visited by heavy storms, 
accompanied by earth shocks on Sep- 
tember 23. Considerable damage has 
been done. 

Official dispatches received from 
.southern ports of the Philippines slate 
that it is rumored there that the reve- 
nue-cutter Sora has been captured by 
Moro pirates and the crew murdered. 
.\ftcr January next the owners of 
foreign automobiles brought into 
France for touring purposes will con- 
tribute a regular tax based on their 
horsepower and length of sojourn. 

El Roghi, the rebellious subject of 
the Sultan of Morocco, who recently 
was brought to Fez a prisoner in an 
iron cage, was put to death on Sep- 
tember 19 in the presence of the 
harem. 

As a result of the recent Imperial 
defense conference in London, the 
Government of the Australian Com- 
monwealth has begun to give effect 
to a decision to train and equip mili- 
tary and naval forces. 

The Congress of the Chambers of 
Commerce of the British Empire, 
which was recently in session at Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., gave its hearty indorse- 
ment to the proposal that the Empire 
own the telegraph services. 

The British steamer Umhlali went 
ashore at Cape Point, S. .'\., during a 
fog on September 16 and was aban- 
doned by her crew. It is believed that 
several persons were drowned by the 
capsizing of a boat. 

General Trevina, military command- 
er of the District of Nortliern Mexi- 
co, who has directed the distribution 
of forces through the district swept 
by the recent flood, has estimated the 
number of lives lost at 3000. 

The Sultan of Morocco has failed 
in his attempt to secure foreign inter- 
vention in the war between Morocco 
and Spain. It is reported that France, 
Great Britain, the United States, Ger- 
many and Russia will adopt a policy 
of non-intervention. 

Three men — Bcrruyer, David and 
Liottard — were guillotined at Valence, 
i'Vance. on September 22 for a series 
of atrocious crimes in the department 
of Drome. A great crowd witnessed 
the execution and applauded wildly 
every time the knife fell. 

In an interview at Honolulu on 
September 17 Premier Ward of New 
Zealand said that in addition to build- 
ing a Dreadnought oT the Indomitable 
type for the Empire at a cost of 
$10,000,000 New Zealand would be 
given three $4,000,000 cruisers, six tor- 
pedo boats and six submarines. These, 
with the .\ustralian fleet and the ships 
attached to the China station will give 
Great Britain double the naval 
strength in the Pacific ocean over all 
other powers with the exception of 
the United States. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School in 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
American and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant officers of the United States 
Navy prepared for e.xaniination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
ing the United States Naval Academy and 
American Merchant Marine. 

Personal instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M. A.. Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 

etc. 



ROOS BROS. 

Biggest Values in Men's Clothing, 

Haberdashery, Hats 

5o yearsTn business 

roos"bros. 

MARKET STREET San Francisco 




Named shoes are frequently made In Non- 
Union factories. 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what Its name, unless It bears a 
plain and readable Impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP are 
always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence of 
the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



The Pride O'Humbolilt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Relatives are inquiring for the fol- 
lowing missing sailors: Alf. Carter 
of Wellesley Street, Auckland, New 
Zealand. John Cruickshank, late mate 
of Br. bark "Kilnieny," was in St. 
Mary's Hospital last August. Charles 
Seymour; made trip jji transport S. S. 
"Sherman" in January, 1907. Was at 
Vancouver 1907. Address Seamen's 
Institute, 242 Stcuart St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



HE LIVES UP TO HIS NAME 

WHO 

Why Boss the Boss Tailor 





SMOKB 




The 


"Popular Favorite," the ' 


•Little 


Beat 


ty," the "Princess" and 


other 


high 


grade union-made cigar*. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 




532 


Second Street, Eureka 


, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers In Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Seattle, Wa»h., Letter Lut. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofllce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle oan 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 

period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 

Allen, W. J. Lauritsen, Hans 

Ander.son, Alf. Larsen, Kristian 

Anderson, Andrew Laive, V. 

Anderson, Carl P. Linder. Victor 

Ankerstrom, C. Lind, Hjilmar E. 

Anker, C. Lorin, Kristian 

Berentsen, R. Mathi.son, Nils 

Benson, E. Martinson. Christ. 

Bianca, P. Machado, E. 

Bird. Chr. Malmberg, A. C. 

Bray, A. E. Masmisen, E. W. 

Brauer, Geo. Martinsohn. A. 

Brown, Jim Mr-JIiilion. J. 

Burkland. John Mohuct. Jah. 

Carlson, Die Mikkelsen, Kristian 

Carlson, Ludwik Miller, Adolf 

Carl.-inn, Thure Molver. Olaf 

Carncll, Geo. B. More. A. O. 
Christofferson, Emil Morrison, J. 

Christensen. Vlggo Monoghan, J. 

Chapman, F. G. Moore, James 

Conee, A. Nagel, A. 

Coughlun. Chas. Nelsen. M. 

Haly, John Ness. Carl 

Daniels, C. Nielsen. Wllhclm 

Drcifplt, Albert Nielsen. B. P. 

Doll. Ifernian Nielsen. Waldemar 

EgelkolT. Fred Olsen. Anton 

Elliot. W. V. Olsson, Just 

Eiiasen, E. Olsen, O. A. -872 

Engberg. Oscar Olason, A. 

Ernst, George Olsson, Johan 

Eric k. Mr. Olsen, Andrew 

Erikson, Alton Olson. Charles 

Erickson. Axel R. Orten, Sigurd 

E?py. Orvilie Owens, J. II. 

Flynn, Mauriie Peters, J. 

Kjclstad, K. M. Pettersen, Sigurd 

Franzell. Arthur Pernin. Clir. 

Fredriksen. B. D. PertPlls. W 

Gekler. Fritz Penny. W. 

(Sonyette, Joseph Petersen. I*. 

Gustafson, Karl O. Price, Bruce 
Han.-en, H. C. -1998 Rasmussen, A. N. 

Haga. A. Andersen Rasmussen, R. -S25 

Hansen. T. S. Reinman, Karl 

Haug, H. H. Rider. Arthur 

Hansen, H. Johan Rider, David 

Hansen, H. K. Rugland. Ole 

tlarrls. Jos. E. Sandstrom. Th. 

HedlunU, Arvid Sanchez. F. 

Hellwood, Mr. Sandstrom. O. H. 

Hewitt. P. Saalenes. T. J. 

Jensen, Johannes Samuelson. Harold 

-lGf<4 Schniak. M. 

Jen.sen. Louis Scherlen, Robert 

Jersch. W. Schultz. Ernest 

.lorgensen, J. A. Sckubber, H. 

Jocketyn, J. Skoog, August 
Johnson. C. F. -1566 Soderlund. J. F. 

Johnson, Eric Solly, Ed. 

Johnson, P. K. J. Sorensen. Hans 

Johnson, Chas. Stoff, K. 

Johnson, C. J. Syvertsen, Ole 

Jolinsen, Hans Swanson, J. 

Johansen. Knut Sunby, A. E. 

Johansen, Alf. Tellefsen, Peder 

Johanson. Victor Thompson, T. 

Johnson, Emil Thorn, Arvid 

Kllntberg, Chas. Torgersen. Ludvig 

Kleine, Carl Tockelyn, T. 

Klausen, Karl Victorsen. Ernest M. 

Klingenlwrg, .lohn Warren, Louis 

Kristiansen. Louis Wallace, A. 

Kristoffcrsen. Emil Walter, E. R. A. 

Kristiansen. Nils Wennecke, A. 

Lathonon. Frank Wifstrand. C. T. 

Larsen. H. C. M. Worm, Albert 
Latz. Konstant 



HERMAN SCHULZE. 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

1.19 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 




SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



HE EMPLOYS ONLY FIRST- 
CLASS UNION HELP 
NUF CED. 

Boss the Tailor 

1120 MARKET ST. 

Opposite Seventh San Francitco 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Wilhelm Drews, born at Breiten- 
fclde, Germany, who was first mate 
on the .■\merican schooner "Philip- 
pine" in 1906 at Aberdeen, is inquired 
for by the German Consul, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Oswald Schnaubelt, a native of 
Schneidemuehl, Germany, born 1883, 
last heard of 1903, is inquired for by 
his mother. Address Mrs. M. Schnau- 
belt, Neu Beelitz, near Bromberg. 
Germany. 

William McLean, a native of Ar- 
broath, Scotland, supposed to be sail- 
ing on the Pacific Coast, and a mem- 
ber of the Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, is in(iuired for by his brother, 
Murdo, ship Loudenhill. Tacoma, 
Wash. 

The five sailors wlio left the schnon 
er A. J. West at Honolulu, on March 
30, 1908, are requested to communicate 
with the Secretary of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific. The libel against 
the A. J. West has been adversely de- 
cided by the Federal Court at Hono- 
lulu. 



When making purclia.'ie.s from our 
advertisers, always menlion the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



MARSHFIELD, OR. 

UNION CIGAR STORE 

383 FRONT ST. 

M M^SHFFEl.n. OREGON 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. CANDY. 

NUTS, ETC. 
Longshoremen and Sailors' Headquarters 
HERMAN CORDES, Prop. 
Phone 97-L 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &t CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 
OR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 




"THE WHITE HOUSE" 

ALEXANDER & McBRIDE 

403 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 



2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 

Hickory Shirts, 50c. 



Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholeiale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

11 Coleman Dock, SEATTLE, Wash. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed in the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

494 ARCADE BUILDING 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS. 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 

Dry Qooda, Clothing, Boots and Shoe*, 

Hats and Caps, Qenta' Furnlsh- 

Inga and Sallora' Outflta. 

31E Water St, next to Commercial Bank 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



First-Class Workmanship, Perfect Fit 
Phone Sunset Main 3771 

.\ place to so when otiu-i.? f:;i! to satisfy. 
STRICT LV UNION HOUSIO. 

NILS HOKANSON 
High Class Tailor 

106 SPRING STREET, bet. 1st and 2nd 
Seattle, Wash. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outiide of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Alfred Douglas Brakel, a native of 
Russia, also known as Fred Hansen,, 
left the Russian cruiser Lena; last 
heard of about three years ago", is in- 
quired for by his mother. Address, 
"Coast Seamen's Journal." 



The grand total of immigration to 
the United States from the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 1820, up to and 
including the last fiscal year, is given 
as 26,852,723. 

City and county officers and one or 
two contractors, seventeen in all, were 
indicted by the Grand Jury at 
Youngstown, O., on September 11, on 
the general charge of grafting. 

The Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposi- 
tion entered upon its last quarter on 
September 12, with every cent of its 
floating indebtedness paid, nearly all 
of its bonds retired and the attend- 
ance increasing. 

French exports to the United 
States, instead of diminishing, have 
increased rapidly, under the new tarifif. 
The total for the month of August 
shows an increase of 76 per cent over 
that of August, 1908. 

The .American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company has completed ar- 
rangements with the Western Union 
Telegraph Company whereby it will 
acquire all the latter's holdings in the 
New York Telephone Company, 
amounting to about $16,000,000. 

Democrats prominent in national 
and New York State politics met at 
Saratoga recently and formed a 
Democratic League, for the purpose 
of bringing their party back to its 
first principles in the hope of win- 
ning in the next national campaign. 
President Taft has announced the 
appointment of Prof. Henry C. 
Emery, of Yale; James B. Reynolds, 
Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, 
and Alvin H. Sanders, an editor, of 
Chicago, as a tarifif commission to 
assist him in the application of the 
new Tariff law. 

New York's new municipal railroad 
is an unquestioned success. On the 
lirst day of its operation it carried 
18,000 passengers across the new 
Queensborough bridge between Man- 
hattan and Long Island City. With 
a 2i/:;-cent fare the city finds that it 
can make a large profit. 

French scientists are beginning to 
distinctly favor submission by Dr. 
Cook and Commander Peary of their 
records to an impartial international 
scientific tribunal. Prince Roland 
Bonaparte, President of the Paris 
Geographic Society, believes that 
France is the logical arbiter. 

An official statement of the grain 
harvest of Canada places the wheat 
crop at 168,386,000 bushels, giving an 
average of twenty-two bushels per 
acre, and barley at 57,000,000 bushels 
or thirty-one bushels per acre. The 
yield of oats is given as 355,000,000 
bushels or thirty-eight bushels per 
acre. 

A net increase of 573,531 in the 
population of the United States by the 
arrival and departure of aliens was 
scored during the last fiscal year, 
against an increase of 209,867 the pre- 
vious year. There was a falling off in 
immigration from 782,870 aliens during 
the previous fiscal year to 751,786 the 
last year. 

Abram C. Eby, Mayor of Burke- 
ville, Va., who wrote to President Mc- 
Crea of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
that unless he was paid the sum of 
$45,000 he would blow up the proper- 
ty of the Norfolk and Western Rail- 
road, was convicted at Philadelphia 
on September 20 of using the mails to 
attempt blackmail. Sentence was de- 
ferred. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter Li»t. 



Much damage was suffered by ship- 
ping in the Gulf of Mexico, caused by 
a great storm on Sept. 20. 

The Naval Board of Construction 
has decided in favor of Parsons tur- 
bine engines for the two new Dread- 
noughts. 

MacAbee, the only surviving mem- 
ber of the crew of the old frigate 
Constitution, celebrated his 106th 
birthday in the Naval Home at Phila- 
delphia on Sept. 22. 

The Hudson-Fulton celebration be- 
gan at New York on Sept. 25, with a 
naval parade participated in by war- 
ships of many foreign nations. The 
festivities will continue for two weeks. 

Two long-hidden relics, paintings 
cut from the walls of the captain's 
cabin on the British frigate Guerrierc 
by order of Commodore Isaac Hull, 
who wanted a souvenir of the battle 
with the Constitution, have been ac- 
([uired by the Navy Department. 

Cramps and other .\merican ship- 
builders are competitors for a share 
of the $13,000,000 that Uruguay is to 
spend on her navy. Uruguay intends 
til buy a cruiser torpedoboat of from 
KKK) to 1200 tons displacement, three 
destroyers from 300 to 350 tons, and 
six smaller torpedoboats. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 84 sail and steam vessels of 17,- 
361 gross tons were built in the 
United States during .\ugust. The 
largest steel vessel included in these 
figures was the J. S. .\shley, of 6361 
gross tons, built at Lorain, O., for 
the .American Ship Building Company. 

Xaval Constructor John G. Tawre- 
sey and live members of the crew of 
the naval tug Xezinscott, which turned 
turtle and sank off Cape Ann on 
-Kugust llih, causing the death of four 
men, appeared before a court-martial 
at Portsmouth, X. 11., on September 

20 in connection with the accident. 
"This is a hell of a ship,"' was the 

great sign read on the side of the 
cruiser Xorth Carolina on Septembei: 

21 as she lay at anchor in Hampton 
Roads. The letters extended two- 
thirds of the way along the hull of 
the cruiser, and had been i)ainted in 
luminous paint, used in making targets 
visible at night. 

That the missing British ships h'alk- 
landbank and Toxteth were probably 
lost as a result of collisions with ice 
off Cape Horn was the verdict given 
by the British Board of Trade inquiry 
recently. Both vessels sailed from 
Port Talbot, Wales, for the West 
Coast, the former in Xovcniber. 1907, 
and the latter in March, 190R 

Queenstown's supremacy as a port 
of call for .\tlantic liners is threat- 
ened by the new port of Fishguard, in 
South Wales, which has been created 
within the last two years by the 
Great Western Railway, and which 
formally began its life as a landing 
place for .American tourists when the 
Mauretani.'i called there on .August 25 



I^etters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Oflice at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
the.se columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg. Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abel, Paul 
Abbors, Arne 
Aga, Johan 
Ahem, Dan 
Akerman, VV. 
Akeison. Clias. A. 
Allen, W. J. 
Andersen, Chr. 
Andersen, -1562 
Andersfn-llOS 
Andersen, Sam 
.\ndeison. Axel 
Anderson, Ned 
.Anderson, John 
Andersson, Emil 
Andersson, -1246 

Bally, W. F. 
Baliman. Karl 
Bankc-1646 
Bartels, Herman 
Barrinto, J. 
Bastion. -1282 
Beck, Mr. 
Bockman. Rudolph 
Beling, Oscar 
Belin, Erik 
Bensen. B. 
Benson-1454 
Benson. .Ino. A. 
Berg, Julius 
Berntsson, M. 
Birde. Chr. 
Birkelund, R. 

Callawav. Kdw. 
Campbell. Noil 
Carlgren-644 
Carl.si-n, Sigurd 
Carlson-760 
Carlson, Chas. 
Carlsson, John W. 
Carlson. Itirnest 
Carlson, Oscar 
Carlsson, E. G. 
Carnaghan, Mr. 
Carrick, .las. B. 
C'ausen, Jorgen 
Ceelan, John 

Dahl, John B 
Uahlbeek, John C. 
Uahl, Ole 
l>av. Harry 
Dioz, Th. H. 
Dixon, John 
Doose, Wm. 
Dorum, B. M. 

Edman-557 

Egtlhoff, Fred 

Eklunu. liariy 

Elfstronn. Axel 

Endresen-6i3 

Kngiieig. Oskar Leo iL,riLSon 

Engblom, Albert 

Faraghar, John 

bV-eley, 1 lionias 

Fenstad, Torger 

Fjellman, Jonas 

Uabrielsen, Knud 

Gasman, Uuo. -v. 

ileiger, Joe 

Gent, Adam C. 

German, R. 

Giblis. Hairy D. 

Gram, Erik 

Giawerl, Joe 

ilaak. Uuinhold 

Haagensen, M. 

Halloran, Chas. A. 

Halvorsen, H. E. 

Hallstrom, J. E. 

iialvoisen, Wm. 

Hammargren, Oscar Henschel, Otto 



Andfrscn-1305 
Andersen-1526 
Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson. Oscar 
Anderson-1274 
Andersson, Karl T. 
Andersson-1552 
.^nder.sson, Fritz 
Antonsen, Marius 
Apps, 1'. 

Aronsen. Halfdan 
Aske, John 
Aunbaun, A. 
-Vustin, Andrew 
Axelsen, Axel 
Aylward, Jas. 

Bjorklund. Erick 
Boisen, Joreeti 
Rorresen, Niels 
i.<i>e.ssoM, John 
Branis. C'nil S. 
Brauer, Friedrich 
Bray. John K. 
Bray, Edward 
Bremer, B. 
Brewer, Wm. 
Brinton. Geo. 
Brox. Harry 
Bruhn, Paul 
Bryde, Carl M. 
Buaas. 'I'homas 
Bung, B. 
Bustamante. Jose 

Chaler. B. 
Chapman, Frank 
Christensen, Albert 
Christonson-STS 
Christenscn-!tO.'. 
Christensen -1325 
Christensen-i:i32 
Christensen. -1126 
Christiansen, J. F. 
Christensen. E. H. 
Christopher, Geo. 
Christoffersen-1288 
Chisholm, R. 
Claus, C. 

Dories, H. 
Draear. K<lgardo 

Drausmann, Chas. 
Huiuan. G. M. 
Duffy, John 
Durholt, Hugo 
Dyrnes, Ij. E. 



Erdman, B. J. 
Eriksen, E. H. 
Eriksen, Karl J. 
Krickson, A. 
Erickson, Fred 
C. \v. 
Erikson, P. E. 
Folwick, Carl 
Fiudenksen, B. 
Fuchs. J. 

Gronholm, Alf. 
Grunman, 11. U. 
Gunnarson, John 
Gunderson. Ole 
Gundersen-785 
Gunrlersen, ilartin 
Guslafsson, G. B. 

Heesche, H. 
Hegener. Reinhold 
Heinz, Jack 
Heikklla, P. 
Heller, O. 
Hflmer. F. II. 



Hansen-1869 
Hansen, Emil 
Hansen. Christian 
Hanson, John 
iiaiiKun, -lli»5 
Hansen. Harold O. 
Hansen-1576 
Hansen, Geo. 
Hansen, H. T. 
Hansen, Jens M. 
Hansen. Theo. 



Hendriksen, Adolf 
Henriksen, Adolf G. 
Hennansen, -lu22 
Hetman, Waller 
Hexen, Mr. 
Hilke, Carl 
Hogluiiil. Frank 
Holm, S. 
Holstein, R. 
Holt, Karl C. 
IIolz-lTGl 



Hansen, Markus H. Hoist, Richard 



rian.ssen, -1867 
Harmening, F. 
Ilaupt, Emn 
iiauyon, l^ars 
Hedlund, Orvid 
Ingeman, -132 
Isaacson, Isaac 
Isakson, Kristen 
Jaconbsen, P.-1786 
Jacobson, Gust. 
J ago, K. 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen, Ca.i». 
Jensen, -1076 
.lenson, T. C. 
Jespersen, Martin 
Joimsen, -1281 
Johnson. Geo. 
Johnson, Hilmer 
, , , , , 1-1 Johnson. Richard 

and landed her passengers and mails johnson, John E. 

Johnson-1800 

Kaho, H. 
Kamp, Gus H. 
Kane, G. 

Kannlsto, K. J. O. 
Kiiilson. Aug. 
Karlsen, Konrad 
Kailsen-270 
Karlson, Richard 
Karlson-956 
Karlgren-644 
Kavall, John 
Keelan, 'J. 
Kellgren, J. A. 
Kenniston, Frank 
Laason, -1790 
Laason, -1370 
l.aason. M. 
Lahr, Otto 



for London. 

Details reached Moliile on Septem- 
ber 17 from the Isle of Pines of 
the greatest marine disaster ever 
known in those waters, which occur- 
red on the night of .August 23, when 
the steamship Nicholas Castania, en 
route from Havana to Cienfucgos 
went ashore on the south co.ist of the 
island near Hell's Cove. .All hands, 
including a crew of twenty-seven and 
two passengers, were drowned. 



Lane, Leonard 

Lane. Lcolaml 

Langvardt, Chr. 

Langdon. Chas. 

Larsen, Anton 

Larsen, Peter 

Larsen-1290 

Larsen-1536 

i^aine, Nicholas 

I.angben. Chas. 

Larson, L. 

Lass, -140G 

Lauretsen, Ole 

Madsen. -^.^2 

Malinberg, lOlis 

Mannik, John 

Marius. Bernhard 

Maripu. John 

Markmann, H. 

Martinsson, Josef 

Margiiussiin. E. VV. Mikkelsen. A. M. 



Lindholm-610 
Lindblad. C. 
Lindeman, Fritz 
landcros, Wm. 
Lindvist, Cari .\. 
Lindroos. Oscar 
Lindgren, G. 
Lohne, K. 
Loinmos, Henri 
Lundgren. -129ii 
Lundberg, John 
Lundberg, Fred 

Mehent. Joe 
Meinking, AA'm. H. 
Melen, Edwin 
Melin, -1712 
Mersman. A. 
Mesak. Edw. 
Mikkelsen, A. S. 



Martin. Geo. 
Mat tier. Franz 
Mattson-709 
Mattson. K. J. 
Mattson. Alex 
McEmbors. U. 
McFarlanc. C. E. 
McKinley, Wm. 

Naber. M. 
Nanberg, Gust. 
Nauman. Alf. 
Nelson. C. M. 
Nelson, Andrew 
Nesbitt, J. 
Nosier. Wilson C. 
Nielsen, -950 
Nielsen. -918 
Nielsen. John N. 
Xilsen. Anders 
Nilsen-985 
Nilsen, Olaus 

O'Daly, John 
Olausen, Krist 
Olsen, Olai 
Oisen, Gust. 
Olsen, Soren 
olsen, jM 
Olsen, Marinus 
Olsen, -499 
Olsen-996 

iaiaiiio, AI. G. 
Pallzek, Lorenz 
Podersen, Alf. 
I'edersen, N. B. 
Pedersen, S. Rein- 
hold 
I'edersen, Olav 
Pedersen, Olaf A.- 
Pedersen, -1086 
Pedersen, -1110 
Penny, Matthew 
Persson, Hjalmar 
Peterson, Henry 
Petersen, Chas. 



Miller, Jas. 
Milos, Peter 
Moller, L. 
Monroe, Geo. 
Muller, Otto 
Muller, Geo. 
Munze, Diok 



E. 



Portland, Or., Letter Lut. 



Nilsson, Kenning 
Nilsson 895 
Nilsson, Adolf H. 
Nilsen. -346 
Nilsson. Edw. 
Nilsson, -935 
Nilsson Cnrl F. 
Nobereit, Gus 
Noel. Kon<' 
Nordstrom. Gust. 
Nordstrom, Gus 
Norvik, Morten 
Nyquist. Wm. 

Olsen-1047 
Olson, Carl 
Olsson, Alf. 
OlsBon, .T. W. 
Olsson. Karl 
Ommundsen. H. 
Opderherk. K 
Osterdahl, Chas. 

Petersen, Henning 
Petersen, -782 
Petersen, Karl O. 
Peterson, -4ya 
Petterson, Gust. 
Petterson, Anton 
Petterson-llbt 
Petterson, O. S. 
Peltersen, O. '1". 
Petterson, Oscar 
Pienier, Wm. 
Poder, J. 

tlllUil. i.. 

Purnhagen, Ludv. 



Rasmussen, Emil Roalsen, h . t.. 
Rasmussen, Jens P. Robsham, Jens W. 
Kasiuussen, -525 Rokov, Steffan 



Hull. H. 
lliiltborg-lS33 
Hultinan, Albin 
Hutchinson, Mr. 

Iversen, Tom 
Iversen, Fred 

Johnson, Carl 
Johnson, Hugo 
Johnson, Fred 
Johnsson, I'rank 
Johansen, C. H. 
Johanson, -880 
Johanessen, M. E. 
Johansen-1191 
Johansson-1856 
Joliaiisson, Oscar 
Johannessen. -1S63 
Jcnasson, Johan 
Jordfold, Theo. 
Jouanne, Walter 

Kerr. Wm. 
Kerch, Geo. C. 
Klaosson, Axel 
Klomensen, Ed. 
Kooning, D. 
Koff, M. 
Koltor, L. 
Kopats, Oscar 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kristoffersen. -12)<8 
Kristiansen. L. A. 
Kristoffersen, Andro 
Kuehme, W. 

Loibold. Fritz 
Lohtii. Alex. 
Leilhoff. Carl 
Linde, O. B. 



Rasmuson, A. 
Kavall, John 
Keichelt, H. A. 
Heutern, Axel 
Rigoult, Bert 
Rintzo, John 

Saar, Hans 
Sampson, Carl 
Saiasing, Carl 
Sand, B. -2113 
Sandberg, N. A. 
Sanasiiuni, O. H. 
Sanuer, Cuaa. 
Sauer, Emil 
Saul, Th. A. 
richevig, A. B. 
riclilacnte, Alf. 
Schluter, Paul 
richmidt, I-ritz 
Schmitt, Geo. 
Scholl, Karl 
Scholtens, Ben 
Schrodt, Alf. 
Schroder, F. A. 
Schulz, Ludvig 
Si-ott, Ed. 
Solander, Gus. 
Scmberg, John 
Scxon, Chas. 
Sie, John 
Siebert, Harry 
Sioni, C. 
Siogurd, J. I. 

Toigland, Karl 
Toiente, M. 
Thomas, Jos. W. 
Thorsen-615 
'i'horsen-6S9 
Tliorn, Edmund 
Thorn, Arvid 
Tillman, A. 
Tillman, Chas. 

Udbye, Harold 
I^nderinann, F. 

Valentine, Geo. 
Valeur, Marius 
Velure-218 
Verbrugge, D. W. 
Vega, F. A. 
Vickers, John 

Wahl. Robert 
Wahl.>5trom, Alb. 
VVallin, John 
Waltland, John 
Wang, Julius 
Watson, A. J. 
Westhofer. H. 
Westlund, Wm. 
Wetzel, Curt 
Wetland. John 
Weyman, Emil 

Zimmerman, F. 



Alfo, John 
Aeckerle, Ernst 
Anderson. Eskil 
Andersson, J. S. 
Berntsen, Julius 
Cox, H. E. 
Farm, J. B. 
Fostwedt, Carl 
Hultberg, Ernst 
Jensen, M. 
Jacobsen, Hans 
Johnson, C. A. 
Kearns, Edwin 
Koch, Carl 
Kjorsvik, Johan 
Kruger, Heinrlch 
Kent. Jack 
Klebingat, Fred 



Lindeman. A. 
Lorin, Cristian 
Lynd, Chas. 
Moren, E. H. 
Olson, Olat 
Olson, Otto 
Ponnl Anton 
Patterson, A. K. 
Roalsen. Fred 
Rasmussen, Andrew 
Scott, Ed. 
Sundholm. Freppa 
Schultz, Ernst 
Schmidt, Franz 
Schneider, William 

I. 
Sanchez, Frank 
Tamm, P. 



Tacotna, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, A. B. Jacobsen, Olai 

AndOLSon. Chas. -907 Johanson, Emil 
Behrent, E. -1579 Larsen, Holger 



Berndt, Hugo 
Buhmeister. John 
Chapman, F. 
Charlson, M. 



Lund, Peter 
McGuire, George 
Meyers, Chas. 
Nilsen, Oscar L. 



Christoffersen, Emil Nordenberg, John 



Clausen, Nils 
Davey, Chas. 
Ekblom, Alfred 
Ekiund, Sven W 
Eliasen, E. -396 
Kranzell, A. 
Frederickson, F. 

-529 
Hansen, Peto 
Harris, J. 



Olsen, Ole Johan 
Olsen, Sigvald 
Poppe, George 
llalshet, August 
Saunders, J. 
Sovig, Chas. 
II. Swanson, Ben 
Turner, Alfred 
Turner, Richard 
Wells, Leo L. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Rommel, Anarew 
Rosenberg, Frans A. 
Rost, K. G. 
Kotlov, St. 
Ryits, A. 

Sievers, Herman 
Silfoeruerg, Huiold 
Sllvenlus, W. R. 
Slmpsun. ].,. C. 
Skagman, W. A. 
Smiiii. 1' red 
Smith, -64b 
Smith, Jas. B. 
SuiUer, Victor 
SoUerlund, A. 
Solana, liana 
Sol berg, T. 
Sorensen, A. 
Southeriand, A. 
Stageland, 1'. 
Stem, Joun 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Suominen. N. 
Svendsin, Otto 
Swensson, Martin 
Swansson, Emil 
Svane, Albert 
Svensson-1795 
Sven.sson-1795 
Svensson-1932 
Sorensen, S. M. 

Tofte. H. 
Tollefson, Aug. 
'iollelsen. Andreas 
Torkeisen, Marinus 
Torvik, Olaf 
Trenton, Louis 
Tupitz, C. 
Turner, Ted 

Utves, K. L. 

Vinje. Hilmar 

Vogel-214 

von den Steene, J. 

Vongehr, Ewald 

Vortman, Wm. 

Wibbed, Louis W. 
Wiberg. E. A. 
Wikland. Chas. 
Wikstrom. O. 
Wilhelmsen, G. 
Will, C. 
Wilke, Wm. 
Willman. Frans-1020 
Wilson, Fred 
Witt. August 



Ahrens, W. 
Anderson, E. 
Alexander, K. 
Arnold, E. B. 
Anderson, P. T. 
Anderson. Harry 
Andersson, J. R. 
Anderson, -1534 
Abbors, A. 
Anderson, Sven 
Appelgreen, J. 
Buchlman, F. 
Billington, M. 
Birkelund, R. 
Busse, Ch. 
Brandt, N. 
Benson, Jon. 
Booslian, Ch. 
Carlson, K. J. 
Christensen, H. 
Christensen. C. 
Duval, Benoit 
Dories, H. 
Dowe, J. 
Domhoft, J. 
Drager, Otto 
Elchel, Ch. 
Eliassen, H. -599 
Ellassen. G. -1427 
Focketyn, F. 
Furman, F. 
Frank, F. -499 
Goepper, Ch. 
Godley, Geo. 
Hansen. H. M. 
Haniger, A. J. 
Hammond, J. A. 



E. 



Hope, Ole 
Jacobsen, -1786 
Johansson, 1700 
Johannesson, J. 
Jacobsen, Erland 
Jensen, L. 
Jalonen, J. 
Johannesen, Carsten 
Kristiansen, L. 
Kavander, W. 
Koskinen, W. 
Long, L. 
Lerch, Paul 
Lewis, G. H. 
Lundgreen, C. 
Matsson, Karl 
Morris, Oscar 
Mulley, James 
Maibom, H. 
Metge, G. 
Morden, J. 
Michalsen, J. 
Nielsen, V. -1000 
Oien, Thorn. 
Orten, S. 
Pierson, A. 
Pederson, -896 
Petersen, C. 
Pedersen, James 
Rantanen, -770 
Rustanious, J. 
Quistgard, C. 
Swales, A. E. 
Swansen, Carl 
Syversen, H. 
Tuvfeson, Knut 
Taddiken, A. 



Hammerquist, A. J. Vongher, Ed. 

Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Ahrens, Walters 
Anderson, Sven 
Boyl, John 
Edwardsen-149 
Ellingsen, Edward 
Erkkila. Andrew 
Hillig, Albert 
Hultberg, John 
Johansen-2021 
Knudsen, T. 



Kirwin, Milton L. 
Melin, Edwin 
Klebingat, Fred 
McCallum, Chas. 
Mehrtens, Herman 
Peterson, Paul 
Samuelsen, Harold 
Stabell, Frank 
Walser, Ernest 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S LETTER LIST. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Letters at the Alaska Fishermen's of- 
fice will be advertised for six months 
only and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of seven months 
from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify the 
Secretary of the Alaska Fishermen's 
Union of their present address, In order 
to have their mail forwarded them. 

Arvidsson, A. M. Lofman, K. 
Andersen, August Morrison, A. 
Andreasen, Mogeno Nicolaisen. Otto 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the PacWc. 

Andersson, Vicktor Johannessen, -1863 
.Mkinson, Samuol Kolstad, Anton 
Holmstrom, Carl A. Pietila. -1338 
Jensen, -1944 Ruthberg, E. 

Johnson. Chas. Torkildsen, Marius 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Anderson, A. O. 
Arntson, Albert 
Benson, John 
Bore, Carl Marius 
Carlson, Gust. 
Fanell, Henry D. 
Gulllksen, Gustav 
Hagon, George L. 
Hansen, Harry 
Johnson, Otto 



Nielsen, Carl Johan 
Nikolatsen, Otto 
Olson, Ole 
Olson, Oskar 
Olson, Oluf 
Peterson, Frank V. 
Prescott, Fred 
Quay, Duncan R. 
Riise, Wm. 
Swanson, Chas. 



Johnson. George P. Thompson, A. 
Kerr, W. Tonnesen, Jorgen 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing. Trunks. Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street. near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
Office: 
23 UNION AVENUE • - Portland, Or*. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



IS 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Marl<et Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

(Memlier of the Assutiated Savidjjs liuuks uf 

8au Francisco. ) 

526 California St., San FranciscOj Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 
Keserve and Contingent Funds 1,504,498.68 

Deposits, June 30, 1909 36,793,2.34.04 

Total Assets 39, 435, 681. Sis 

Remittance may be made by draft, postoffice 
or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s money orders, or coin by 
express. 

Office hours — 10 o'clocii a.m. to 3 o'clock p.m., 
except Saturdays to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday 
evenings from 7 o'clock p.m. to 8 o'clock p.m. 
for receipt of deposits only. 
Officers. 

President, N. Olilandt; first vice president, 
Daniel Meyer; second vice president, Emil Uolite; 
oasbier, A. H. R. Schmidt; assistant cashier. 
William Herrmann; secretary. George Tourny; 
assistant secretary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow 
& Eells, general attorneys. 

Board of Directors. 

N. Ohiandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Eohte, Ign. 
Rteinhardt, I. N. Walter. .T. W. Van Bergen, 
F. Tillmann Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. Good- 
fellow. 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission street, between 
Twenty-first and 'Twenty-second streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 

C. W. Heyer, Manager. 
Richmond District Branch, 432 Clement 
Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. 
For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 
Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 2Sc to 
7Sc per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 
400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
%2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; 11.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 



THE ADMIRAL 

146 EAST STREET 

100 large, nicely furnished rooms from 
35c to $2 per day, $2 to $5 per week. 

Electric Light and Call Bells, Hot and 
Cold Water, and Clean, Sanitary Bedding 
in Every Room. Electric Elevator Ser- 
vice. Free Baths. 



FERRY HOUSE 

CORNER EAST AND MISSION STS. 

Opposite Ferry Building 
EARTHQUAKE AND FIREPROOF 
The only house in the block between 
Market and Mission streets which was not 
injured by the great catastrophe of 1906. 
Nice Sunny Furnished Rooms from 25c 
to $2 per day; $1.50 to $6 per week; rooms 
for two persons $2.50 per week. 

BANNERS, REGALIA, ETC. 

Gold Bullion, Silk Embroidered and 
Painted Silk and Satin Banners; Hand 
Embroidered Silk American and Spe- 
cial Flags; Reversible and Ribbon 
Parade Badges; Silk and Satin Sashes 
and Regalia. All Union Made and 
Manufactured by 
THE WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 
860 Mission St. Phone Kearny 1966 

Patronize Home Industry. 



BXPRESSIINQ 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411 San Francisco 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
109STEUARTST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



BfiST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CIGAR CO.. liANUrACTURCRS 

133 HARTFORD ST., S. F. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CAUFORIOA 

MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 

Branches: 624 Van Ness Avenue and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letters of Credit issued, payable in all parts of the world. 
Chas. F. Leege, Pres. W. A. Frederick, Vice-Pres. B. G. TognazzI, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vice-Pres. 



SOMETHING NE'W 

TKe Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

" ANTIDOTE, " 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
tant Advantages 
which can be found 
In No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking In. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first few smokes in 
an ordinary Pipe, 
the First Smoke in 
a n "ANTIDOTE" 
Is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 
protects the briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" is alv\/ays 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making It 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) Is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing it to pass oft Into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

RASSBR BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET, S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Carl Bundessen, a native of Geeste- 
munde, Germany, born 1883, is in- 
quired for by Alfred Wrede, 20 East 
street, San Francisco. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Any one 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Portland, 
Ore. 

Henry Laurent, who has been sail- 
ing between San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 

John Johnson, a native of Norway, 
born September IS, 1858, at Blege- 
leidet Bamle; last heard from in 1904 
living at 230 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, 165 Third 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



C. J. SWANSON 

Clothier & Furnisher for Gentlemen 
Up-to-Date Suits Made to Order 

$12 and Up 

Suits Cleaned and Preued $1 
Alterations a Specialty 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 

Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform gold braids and gold wreaths of 
all descriptions. 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Wuhiaston 
SAN FRANCISCO CAUFORNIA 



BOSsrsOAD 




OVERALLS 

Neusfadter Bros. 

5AN FRANCISCO NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



£r^ 1» m ^— <^ w^r^ » "^T"^ C!* ^^* ^^^^ '*^'® \&ht\ (in light blue) 
^•^[^^■■^ 3 iNk. |~^l^r ^^appears on the box in which 



you are served. 



Issued By Aulhorily of me Ciga/ MaKers' InleinatJonal Union of Amerrca 

Union-made Cigars. 

WXIA €n.1if if;3. 1M «•> CI9«" zmaixt mM% bo have be«i madii by a t II3-WSS mrl(lll|l 



■1113 VLtllllUp. inai uiBi.i'jfliJ i.ui'ionre'. M'u>i. w«- ■«." -.■^■' "■—--/-■■■-• ——-■■- - - 

a UtKBtR OMHE IXM M»«f (IS 'IHIWHAIIOIIAL UNION o( AiMtiu. wn orjanizatwi dcvoled re die ad. 
vanceiiHil o( Ifce MOBAl MAHRlAljnd INIQliaiWl WlirARt OF TX[ CRAIT. "— ' ' 



m these CiQan to all smokers t}iroiiahout the world 

' All Inttingemints upon this Label mil be punished accofdin^ to laM 



Therefore we reconfliend 



fAC 
*»' SIMILE 



Y- W (^Si^fe<««?, /-Modern 
V C iff I/O) 



>f America 




The boys employed by the Illinois 
Glass Works at San Francisco, went 
on strike recently for an increase of 
wages from $1.50 to $2 per day. 

A number of central labor bodies 
throughout the country have refused 
to expel the anti-McNuIty locals of 
the Electrical Workers' Union. 

The labor movement of Washing- 
ton, D. C., is making extensive prepa- 
rations to receive President Gompers 
upon his return from Europe, about 
October 12. 

Street-carmen of Omaha, Neb., 
went on strike recently and are still 
out. Much trouble has occurred as 
a result of the efforts to run cars with 
strikebreakers. 

As a result of a jurisdiction fight 
between the Western Federation of 
Miners and the hoisting engineers, 80 
per cent of the mines of the Butte 
(Mont.) district were closed down on 
September 24. 

Secretary Morrison of the American 
Federation of Labor, on September 19 
received word that by an almost unan- 
imous vote, the United Brotherhood 
of Carmen, in convention at Atlanta, 
Ga., has decided to affiliate with the 
Federation. 

President Gompers of the Amefican 
Federation of Labor, accompanied by 
J. W. Sullivan, of New York, and 
David Lubin, of California, recently 
visited the workmen's organization at 
Milan, Italy, where he discussed the 
question of Italian immigration to the 
United States. 

The striking weavers at the Iron 
Works Cotton Mills at Fall River, 
Mass., have accepted a 5 per cent in- 
crease in wages and returned to work 
on September 16. The weavers struck 
for a 10 per cent advance. About 
5000 employes were thrown out of 
work. 

Large gains in membership of the 
Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' Union 
were shown by the reports of the of- 
ficers at the international convention 
in Boston on September 14. President 
William J. McSorley, of Cleveland, 
recommended in his report that bi- 
ennial meetings be held instead of the 
annual conventions. 

At the annual convention of the 
International Wood, Wire and Metal 
Lathers' Union at Boston on Septem- 
ber 18 there was no opposition to the 
re-election of International President 
William J. McSorley of Cleveland. 
Other officers elected include John 
Bell of San Francisco and P'rank Ma- 
lioney of Seattle, vice-presidents. 

William Buckley, sentenced to death 
for murder in connection with the 
iron trades strike at San Francisco in 
1901, received a commutation of sen- 
tence to fifteen years' imprisonment, 
granted by Governor Gillctt on Sep- 
tember 21. Buckley will shortly be 
paroled and probably pardoned later 
on. Governor Gillett announced his 
belief in the innocence of Buckley. 

Arrangements have been perfected 
for ihe restoration of the union label 
of ihc United Hatters of North Ameri- 
ca to all the factories in Danbury, 
Bethel and New Milford, Conn., from 
which the label was taken at the time 
of the inauguration of the Hatters', 
strike. This action is a step toward 
the final adjustment between the 
manufacturers and the Union. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



A Mean Man. 

She said lier fortune was her face. 

Responded he 

That poverty 
Was no disgrace. 



Another Alexander. — "You are all 
the world to me," said the man who 
had been twice divorced. 

"Yes," replied the pretty grass 
widow, "and if I married you it 
wouldn't be long before you would 
be looking around for new worlds to 
conquer." — Chicago Record Herald. 



It Worked. — Mrs. Brown — "You told 
me that if I left my tablecloth out all 
night the fruit stains would disap- 
pear. Well, I put it out last night." 

Mr. Jones — "Of course the stains 
were gone in the morning?" 

Mrs. Brown — "Yes; so was the 
tablecloth."— Tit-Bits. 



Abusing His Strength. — Magis- 
trate — "What was going on when you 
reached the house of these two pris- 
oners?" 

Policeman — "The man was on the 
floor yelling for help, and his wife 
was beating him with a flatiron, tell- 
ing him she would teach him how to 
abuse a poor, weak, defenseless wom- 
an." — Washington Star. 



Forget It. — A clerk in a Wall street 
office posted this notice on his desk 
one morning recently when he entered 
the office looking, as one of his asso- 
ciates said, "like a dissolving view:" 
"I know it's warm. I don't care to 
know how little you slept last night. 
It is usually warm at this time of the 
year in this part of the world. For- 
get it!" — New York Tribune. 



Making the Best of It. — When the 
young husband reached home from 
the office he found his wife in tears. 

"Oh, John!" she sobbed on his 
shoulder, "I had baked a lovely cake 
and I put it out on the back porch 
for the frosting to dry and the dog ate 
it." 

"Well, don't cry about it, sweet- 
heart," he consoled, patting the pretty 
flushed cheek. "I know a man who 
will give us another dog." — Brooklyn 
Life. 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe in a. savings account. 

They can not start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 



[.-iKressor to 

THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 
DEPOSITARY OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Capital and Surplu.s $600,000. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

LEWIS I. COWGILL, President HENKY WILSON 

FREUEHICK F. SAYRE, Vice-President ALBERT SUTTON 

L. M. MacDONALU, Cashier JACOB JENSEN 

J. C. ESCHEN W. H. LITTLE 

Money transmitted to all parts of the world at lowest rales. 




United States 
Watch Qub 

E. r. COLLINS, Manatfsr 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

50 EAST ST., and 4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 




AGENT U. S. GOVERNMENT CHARTS AND NAUTICAL PUBIICATIONS 
HTDOGRAPHIC AND GEODETIC 



H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Gore ol Sacramenti mi Market Sts.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAl. 

DEALER IN 

Watches, Chronometers, Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods, Diamonds 



MARINE ca, FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined fay Transit Observation 
Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN 8. CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. 
Boss of the Road Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 
Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 



Try Bagley's 
Sweet Tips 

For Pipe or Cigarettes 

lOc Tins 



-ro bswd SvlbAiitlunlii ol tin •.<>- aB 
inUHiWOIKEU^jiSSKINTnNfllONJU. I UIVIOIV 

_ _™'!2^^^J MADE 

^•^" I '""" ^ 




^ommenCa 



SAN FRANCISCO STORE 

Purnishings 
for Men 

A Special in Pajamas 
and Ties 

Men's Ties — A large .shipment of 
Ties to he sold at 25c each has 
just arrived, and will he placed 
im sale to-day. The values are 
exceptional, for many splendid 
>ilks often shown in ties selling 
at 5()c are included in this assort- 
nieiit. Stripes, figures, checks, 
in either the striking or sombre 
lone effects; also some ties in 
plain colors. Styles include open 
end four-in-haiuls, tecks hand, 
shield bows and clubs. Priced at 
25c c.Tch. 

Men's Pajamas made of Hannelette, 
in pink, blue and tan stripes. 
Perfect fitting and splendidly 
mnde. $1.50 a set. 



Market and Sixth Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



PAGE 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Now located at 

82 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Franclsca 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

F'urtusliing Goods. Hats. Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc, Hoots, Shoes. Rubber 
Boots and OH Clotliirui. .Seamen's Outfits 
a specialty. 

If you want tlrst-ciass goods at the 
lowest market pnte, give us a call. Uo 
not make a mistake — ^Look for the Name 
and Number. 



ill Wiiek It; ilthf 
Wtmstod (« 1 7"n 



Dont forget Charles Johnson's 

DEFENDER CIGAR STORE 

22 East St., San Francisco. 

My aim is to please everybody with 

good goods, fair prices and 

courteous treatment. 

Agent for Sheerin's Laundry. 



IRELIABLE'^ 



Telephone Kearny 2017 



Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 

■' 715 MARKET STREET next to Call Building 

Branch Store 2593 Mission Street near 22nd 
San Francisco, Cal. 

, Largest and Finest Assortment in Diamonds 

'Watclies, Clock.s, Jewelry, Silverware, CutGlas.s, Opera 
Glasses. Umbrellas and Silver Novelties. 

_ Ejes Eiamined Free bj Expert Opticians 

2JK. ISK. & 14K. Solid Oold Wcddlnj Rln|[» .Sold by Weljhl 



UNITED STATES NAUTICAL COLLEGE 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

This Modern Navigation School has no superior in the world to-day. 
As a practical navigator the Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right experience and ability to teach .vou up-to-date 
methods in a systematic and easy manner. You ran find one or more of our pupils 
on most any vessel sailing out of this port. ASK THEM. 

Advice on Maritime I^aw, Ship's Business and Naturalization FREE. 
Evenings By Appointment. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 

320 MARKET ST., S. F. Visitors Welcome. Telephone Kearny 4686 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
Political Printinga Specialty 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 
1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 
2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 



When making purchases from our 
adverti.sers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXIII, No. 3. 


SAN FRANCISCO. WF.DNESDAY. OCTOBER 6. 1909. 


Whole No. 2037. 





ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION. 



FOLLOWING is an article by Chester H. 
Rowel!, in the September issne of the An- 
nals of the American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, being part of a symposium 
on "Chinese and Japanese in America": 

If an off-hand comment on the more obvious 
facts of Chinese and Japanese immigration as 
they strike the average Californian is considered 
a sufficient response to the request of the editor 
of The Annals for an article on this subject, it 
must be because precisely this off-hand view is 
one of the essential factors in any race problem. 

It must always be remembered that the white 
American's standard of judging strange peoples 
is personal and unobjective. The average 
Southern white man, for instance, is most favor- 
ably disposed toward a type of Negro objectively 
inferior, — the type, namely, which best fits the 
inferior status which the white man prefers the 
black man to occupy. In a part of California 
very familiar to the writer, there is a large 
Armenian and a large Russian immigration. The 
Armenian, who is generally a superior person, is 
unpopular because his success is for himself, in 
his own business. The Russian peasant, who is 
often an inferior person, is popular because his 
labor is useful to us, in our business. The same 
standard of judgment is applied to the Chinese 
and Japanese. Pinned down to an objective 
judgment of the races as such, the Californian 
would doubtless place the Japanese in the higher 
rank. He judges the Chinese by their coolie class, 
and regards them as an inferior race. But it is 
almost impossible to get the Californian to look 
at the question thus objectively. Ask the ques- 
tion, "Which race is superior?" and you get the 
subjective answer, "I find the Chinese more useful 
to me, in my business." Also, the American 
business man insists on judging men by business 
standards. The Chinese virtues are business vir- 
tues and the Japanese faults are business faults. 
Therefore, the Chinese are judged by their virtues 
and the Japanese by their faults. 

Taking for the moment this biased viewpoint, 
we find the Chinese fitting much better than the 
Japanese into the status which the white Ameri- 
can prefers them both to occupy — that of biped 
domestic animals in the white man's service. The 
Chinese coolie is the ideal industrial machine, the 
perfect human ox. He will transform less food 
into more work, with less administrative friction, 
than any other creature. Even now, when the 
scarcity of Chinese labor and the consequent rise 
in wages have eliminated the question of cheap- 
ness, the Chinese have still the advantage over 
all other servile labor in convenience and ef- 
ficiency. They are patient, docile, industrious, 
and above all "honest" in the business sense that 
they keep their contracts. Also, they cost noth- 
ing but money. Any other sort of labor costs 
human effort and worry, in addition to the money. 
But Chinese labor can be bought like any com- 
modity, at so much a dozen or a hundred. The 
Chinese contractor delivers the agreed number of 
men, at the agreed time and place, for the agreed 
price, and if any one should drop out he finds 
another in his place. The men board and lodge 
themselves, and when the work is done they dis- 
appear from the employer's ken until again 
needed. The entire transaction consists in paying 



the Chinese contractor an agreed number of dol- 
lars for an agreed result. This elimination of the 
human element reduces the labor problem to 
something the employer can understand. The 
Chinese labor-machine, from his standpoint, is 
perfect. 

But there are, of course, the additional stand- 
points of the merchant and the white laboring 
man. To the merchant the chief function of 
humanity is to "keep the money at home" and in 
circulation. The Chinaman spends his money 
with his own merchants, for Chinese goods, or 
sends it back to China directly. Therefore he is 
not a mercantile asset. In the old days, when 
the Chinese were sufficiently numerous and cheap 
to be real competitors, there was of course a 
violent labor-union opposition to them, most of 
which is now diverted to the Japanese, as the 
more immediate menace 

But all this is academic and historical. The 
Chinese are a disappearing problem. Most of 
those still remaining in America are old men. 
The few born in this country, and the more 
numerous ones smuggled in, are only a handful, 
and there are not now in California enough Chi- 
nese to do more than a small part of the servile 
labor which our transitional industrial condition 
could absorb. So long as California undertakes 
to do intensive farming on large estates, with a 
small population, so long will there be a demand 
for much more farm labor, at certain seasons, 
than the local industries can support or the local 
population absorb during the remainder of the 
year. Fortunately, there is a harvest of some sort 
going on in some part of California almost every 
month in the year, so that it is only necessary to 
organize the migration of this temporary labor to 
keep it continuously occupied. The problem of 
meeting this condition with organized white labor 
is difficult and has not yet been solved. Mean- 
time, the Chinese have met ideally the require- 
ments of the employing white farmer. But there 
are not enough of them left, and in their search 
for a substitute the farmers have turned to the 
Japanese. 

The Japanese are a very different people. As 
laborers they are less patient but quicker and 
brighter than the Chinese. In certain industries, 
particularly the thinning of sugar beets and the 
picking of raisin grapes, their short legs and abil- 
ity to squat make them the most efficient workers 
in existence. A white man's efficiency is reduced 
very greatly when he has to squat. A Japanese 
can do as much work squatting as standing. 
Under the stimulus of "piece work," the Japanese 
work rapidly, but not carefully. 

These differences, however, are minor. The one 
overshadowing contrast is this: The Chinese will 
keep a contract; the Japanese will not. Chinese 
business, like American business, is based on the 
assumption of the inviolability of contracts. 
Therefore the American and the Chinese can 
understand each other, on this point. But the 
Japanese seems to have no coni])rehcnsion of the 
contract as a fundamental obligation, while the 
American cannot understand how a man can have 
any virtue who lacks this one. The Japanese con- 
tractor buys the fruit on the trees, as the Chinese 
used to do. The price goes down, and he refuses 
to understand how he could be bound by an 
agreement which has now ceased to be profitable. 
Japanese grape-pickers agree to pick a crop at a 



certain price. When the work is half done, there 
comes a chance to get a higher price elsewhere 
and they all decamp. There comes a sudden 
threat of rain in the drying season, and the trays 
must be "stacked" at once or the crop will be 
irreparably damaged. Instantly the cost of Japa- 
nese labor rises to blackmail prices, regardless of 
previous contracts. Of course there is such re- 
course as the law gives, but that is very little on a 
labor contract, and, generally, no legal obligation 
is worth much in business unless it is recognized 
also as a moral obligation. The Japanese does 
not recognize a contract as a moral obligation, 
and the American therefore assumes that he has 
no sense of any moral obligation. In an industrial 
system based on contract the Japanese must ac- 
quire a new sort of conscience, or he will remain 
an industrial misfit. 

This of course is only the narrowly industrial 
view, chiefly that of the employing farmer. So- 
cially, it is necessary to consider both the actual 
condition produced by the presence of Chinese 
and Japanese in moderate numbers, and the pos- 
sible condition which would result if the bars 
were thrown down to the free immigration of 
either. 

The Chinese live both by preference and by 
compulsion in "Chinatown," where they conduct 
their own affairs, independently of our laws and 
government, much as they do in China. 

Adjoining Chinatown is usually the "tender- 
loin," and the whole district is the plague-spot of 
a California city. There is no law in Chinatown. 
The slave traffic is open and notorious, and slave 
pens, with bought slave girls peering through the 
barred windows, are a familiar sight. The most 
respected occupations of the leading Chinese 
citizens are gambling and lottery. As the labor- 
ing Chinese have become fewer, older and poorer, 
the games have turned to white men and Japanese 
for their victims. The Japanese rarely run 
gambling houses, but they are the chief frequenters 
of them, and lose much money. Chinese lotteries 
hold drawings twice a day, and tickets can be 
bought as cheaply as ten cents. Sometimes one 
small city will support a dozen lotteries. The 
tickets are peddled secretly, by the Chinese and 
by white cigar dealers and others, to American 
men and boys. In Chinatown the opium den or 
"hop joint" flourishes, and the opium-smoking 
white men who infest Chinatown are the dregs 
of creation. The governing bodies of Chinatown 
are the rival companies or "tongs," which enforce 
their decrees and settle their feuds by murder. 
There is a caste of professional hired murderers, 
or "highbinders," who are the executive arm of 
this peculiar government. The writer has seen 
the bodies of dead highbinders, after a tong war, 
stripped of actual chain armor, knife-proof and 
hatchet-proof. Chinese are sometimes convicted 
of murder, but there is never any telling whether 
you have convicted the right man. The Chinese 
whose word in a business obligation would be as 
good as a government bond, will perjure himself 
unblushingly on the witness stand. The jury-box 
estimate of Chinese testimony is that no China- 
man can be believed under oath. Chinese gambling 
joint."; are actual fortresses, with steel doors, sen- 
tries, and a labyrinth of secret exits. They are 
an open, fortified defiance of law, and are a source 
of almost universal police graft. An honest 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A STERN CHASE. 



I was sitting in the <lingy, little smoking 
room of the Cherry Street Sailors' Home in 
New York one morning many years ago, blow- 
ing a cloud of tobacco smoke all around mc 
and communing strictly with myself, when 
Steve Leslie, a shipmate, ta])ped me on tlie 
shoulder and said : 

"What d'you say if we go an' ship in the 
Hidalgo? She's goin' to sign this afternoon, 
an' Alexander sez he'll put you an' me an' 
'Brocky Wilcox' in her if we want to go. 
Now that 'Red' ]Mur])hy is out of her 1 guess 
she'll be all right." 

Ordinarily my answer woidd have been a 
prompt and emphatic "No." The Hidalgo 
was one of that numerous class of American 
decpwater ships whose gory annals are told 
in the Red Record. Her evil reputation was 
mainly due to the cruelties perpetrated by tiie 
chief mate, one "Red" Murphy, an ineffably 
brutal scoundrel and allround ruffian. On the 
last voyage of the Hidalgo he had so ill- 
treated several of the crew that on her arrival 
in New York they had to be taken to the 
Marine Hospital, where one of them subse- 
quently died of his injuries. Cnfortunately 
"Red" Murphy was allowed to make good his 
escape, for nuirders of sailors were so com- 
mon in those days that only the most flagrant 
cases were ever investigated by tlic authorities. 

However, times were hard, and now that 
"Red" Murphy was out of the Hildago I 
might travel further and fare worse in the 
selection of a ship. I had been staying a 
month in the Sailors' Home, and if I wanted 
anytliing out of my advance I would have to 
ship pretty soon. Then, an opjiortunity to sail 
with old and tried shipmates is a desideratum 
which, with the average sailorman, outweighs 
•a good many drawbacks. Steve and "Brocky" 
and T had made several voyages together, and 
were as thick as the proverbial mush. When 
it came to having trouble witii the afterguard 
we knew that we could depend on one another 
right up to the hilts of our sheath-knives. 
And so, after cogitating on Steve's pro])osi- 
tion for a minute or more, I said to him : 

"Let's go out an' find 'Brocky' an' sec what 
he thinks about it." 

We found "Brocky" in the "Honest Man's" 
place, and as he happened to have a little 
money in his jeans we were soon seated 
around a table sampling Cherry-street booze, 
talking business between drinks. Cheered 
and made reckless by the cup that inebriates 
we signed articles a few hours later to pro- 
ceed in the ship Hidalgo on a voyage to Ran- 
goon, "and such other i)orts as the master may 
direct, and back to a final port of discharge in 
the L'nited States north of Hatteras," etc., etc., 
"sixteen dollars a month, forty advance and 
nothing for the chance." In passing I may 
mention that Mr. Alexander, the superin- 
tendent of the Sailors' Home, got around the 
last mentioned clause by the simple expedi- 
ent of charging each of us $5 for "cashing 
the note." 

Two days after signing articles, having in 
the meantime duly sjjent the few dollars com- 
ing to us from our advances, we were rounded 
up along with various contingents from other 
boarding-houses and placed onboard the Hi- 
dalgo under guard of a squad of runners 
armed l/ith blackjacks, knuckle-dusters, revol- 
vers, and a goodly fund of profanity. The 
way of the transgressor may be hard, but it 
isn't a patch on the way trod by American 
deepwater sailors in "them days." 

The crew, twcntv strong, was the usual New 



York blend, iiardiy any two of them of the 
same nationality. Tlie only one among them 
having the earmarks of a "native son" was so 
obviously a tyro at the game we were up 
against that he at once became the target for 
sundry uncom])limentary wittici.sms. 

"Hey, sis.sy, where did you get that tie?" 
"Say, Dolly, you oughter have left that com- 
plexion ashore : it'll git spoiled here, .sure." 
"How long have you been wearin' kidgloves, 
dude?" "Oh, but the mates won't do a thing 
to you — what ! " were some of the cjuestions 
and remarks hurled at the verdant-looking 
stranger. 

He stood the l)omI);u"dnicnl with tiie imper- 
turbability of one who knows how to take care 
of himself in any company; and as he seemed 
to have more whisky bottles in his clothes-bag 
than anything else he soon managed to turn 
tlie tide of ])opular sarcasm aside, so much 
so that those who but now had been gibing 
him were presently singing, "He's a jolly good 
fellow." and ])le(lging him undying friendship. 
"^'ou're all right, cull," they shouted in tipsy 
glee. "We'll make a sailor of you before you 
git back this far." 

In appearance he was a smooth-faced, slight 
youth of twenty-five or so, with that air of 
precocious aplomb and easy nonchalance which 
never wholly deserts your true-bcjrn young 
American. His features were regular, refined 
almost, and denoted intelligence of a kind 
which, at iiis age, is only found in those who 
have enjoyed the advantages of cultured asso- 
ciation. The small, slender, wcU-.shaped 
iiands, with their immaculately manicured 
nails, told as plainly as words could have done 
that manual labor had never been much of a 
hobby vvitli him, dcsjiite the tough-looking 
togs witli wiiicli he iiad arrayed him.self. 
What liis past had been was, of course, not 
easy to determine : but I judged him to be 
one of those social derelicts who have come 
to the end of their rope, and for whom the 
waterfront of a great city somehow seems to 
have a mysterious attraction akin to that 
which drew despairing souls to the waters of 
Lethe. That he had been virtually shanghaied 
onboard the 1 lidalgo was tolerably certain. At 
tiiat I pitied liim, for I knew only too well 
wiiat sort of life lay in store for him. 

Some one whom we took to be the mate 
came to the forecastle door after a while and 
sang out: "Man the windlass, men. an' let's 
git under weigh. Three or four of youse pass 
the end of the tow-line to the tugboat." 

"Talks like a decent chap, that mate does," 
said "Brocky" as he handed me and Steve a 
bottle for a final swig. In a few minutes more 
we were heaving in the chain to the strains of 
"Shenandoah." .\ strong westerly wind was 
blowing and sending the .scud across the win- 
try sky at a rate that gave promise of a real, 
old-fashioned "Yankee slant" to see us oflf on 
our long road. The Hidalgo, by all accounts, 
was the girl that could do some tall sailing, 
too; holding the records both ways for the 
fastest passages ever made between New York 
and San Francisco. 

Towing down tlie lower bay from the Nar- 
rows wc set the headsails, foresail and top- 
.sails, and catted and fished the anchor. The 
greenhorn by this time began to lose some of 
his assurance, for as the effects of the whisky 
died out among his new-found friends so did 
their friendship. Likewise had he collided 
once or twice already with the business end 
of the second mate, who was not slow to see 
where lay the line of least resistance to his 
blandishments. One thing that puzzled us was 
that there seemed to be onlv two mates on- 



board, wiiile our imder.standing was that she 
had always carried three, the third mate act- 
ing as boatswain. However, we concluded 
that the old man would j^robably pick out some 
one in the forecastle to act as boatswain, and 
let it go at that. 

When she got to within about two miles of 
Sandy Hook the skii)])er. a gouty, i)ot-bellied, 
bald-headed okl fellow with a grouchy expres- 
sion on his face, hobbled up on the forecastle- 
head and hailed the pilot on the tugboat, say- 
ing, "There he comes, down yonder," pointing 
over toward the Jersey shore. Whereupon 
the tug put her wheel hard a port and pulled 
us right up in the wind, after which she 
stopped as if waiting for something. Won- 
dering what was up we looked over the lee 
rail and saw a large sailboat with two men 
seated in the sternsheets racing toward us, her 
lee gunwale all but under water from the press 
of canvas she carried. In two or three min- 
utes more she was nearly alongside, and I was 
just getting a line ready for her when 1 felt 
a grip on my arm and heard Steve mutter- 
ing lioarsely: "Sold. i)y (iod; it's 'Red' Mur- 
])hy." 

It may well be imagined that my feelings 
on hearing this were anything but agreeable. 
But I was younger then than I am now. and 
had my full share of youth's oinimism. so after 
telling Steve to cheer up I jumped up on the 
rail and threw tlie line to tlie boat, which had 
sheered alongside in the meantime. .\nd there 
was "Red" Mur])hy. sure enough, coming up 
the side ladder, grinning all over at the way 
he had outwitted us. Contrary to our expecta- 
tions, however, he said nothing, but took his 
]>ortmanteau and walked aft, merely nodding 
familiarly to the other two mates. 

Half an hour later we were outside of Sandy 
Hook. .After hauling in the hawser and set- 
ting the rest of the sails we were mustered 
aft around the capstan. Here the mates 
l)icked watches, after which all hands were 
sent to dinner. .As good luck would have it 
Steve and I were picked by the second mate, 
while "I') rocky" and the poor greenhorn got 
into the mate's watch. 

When we got below for dinner "Brocky" 
took Steve and me to one side and .said : 

"This here is a ])retty kettle of fish we've 
got ourselves into. There is goin' to be mur- 
der onboard of this hooker all right, for I'll 
never stand for any bulldozing from that mate. 
An' when it comes to a showdown in the 
courts I guess I'll have more friends than 
'Red' Murphy." 

This last was in allusion to the fact that 
"Brocky" was the proud owner of a gold 
medal presented to him by Congress for brav- 
ery. Some years jireviously, while serving as 
(juartermaster on the C S. Ship ]>rooklyn, 
he had, at the imminent risk of his own life, 
saved the life of the admiral of the fleet, then 
on the Chinese station. The admiral had been 
ashore to some function or other, and not wish- 
ing to stay until morning he had engaged a 
native sampan to bring him onboard late at 
night. Coming alongside of the ship, what 
with the darkness and the pitching of the 
sami)an, he missed the accommodation ladder 
and fell into the water in.stead. The current 
was running a good three miles an hour at 
the time, but without the least hesitation 
"Brocky" sprang overboard and succeeded in 
getting hold of the drowning man and keep- 
ing him afloat till help arrived. 

Of course, we cautioned "Brocky" against 
any undue rashness ; but beyond that we could 
not consistently go, for deep down in our 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 













^^^^* 




On the Atlantic Coast. 

( Contributed by tbe Atlantic Q)ast Seamen's Unions. ) 




^^^^^ 













DISCOVERY OF COMPASS. 



Much interest must forever attach to the 
discovery of this instrument, and yet there 
are few subjects concerning which less is 
known. For a period the honor of the in- 
vention was ascribed to Gioia, a pilot born 
at Pasitano, a small village situated near 
Amalfi, about the end of the thirteenth cen- 
tury. His claims, however, have been dis- 
puted. Much learning and labor have been 
bestowed upon the subject of the discovery. 
It has been maintained by one class that 
even the Phoenicians were the inventors ; by 
another that the Greeks and Romans had a 
knowledge of it. Such notions, however, 
have been completely refuted. One passage, 
nevertheless, of a remarkable character oc- 
curs in the works of Cardinal de Vitty, 
Bishop of Ptolemais, in Syria. He went to 
Palestine during the fourth crusade, about 
the year 1204; he returned afterward to Eu- 
rope, and subsequently l^ack to the Holy 
Land, where he wrote his work entitled 
"Historia Orientalis," as nearly as can be 
determined, between the years 1215 and 
1220. In chapter 91 of that work he has this 
singular passage : "The iron needle, after 
contact with the lodestone, constantly turns 
to the north star, which, as the axis of the 
firmament, remains immovable while the 
others revolve, and hence it is essentially 
necessary to those navigating on the ocean." 

These words are as explicit as they are 
extraordinary ; they state a fact and an- 
nounce a use. The thing, therefore, which 
essentially constitutes the compass must 
have been known long before the birth of 
Gioio. In addition to this fact, there is an- 
other equally fatal to his claim as the orig- 
inal discoverer. It is now settled beyond a 
doubt that the Chinese were acquainted with 
the compass long before the Europeans. It 
is certain that there are allusions to the 
magnetic needle in the traditionary period 
of Chinese history, about 2600 years before 
Christ, and a still more credible account of 
it is found in the reign of Chingwang- of the 
Chow dynasty, before Christ 1114. All this, 
however, may be granted without in the 
least impairing the just claims of Gioia to 
the gratitude of mankind. The truth appears 
to be that the position of Gioia in relation to 
the compass was precisely that of Watt in 
relation to the steam engine — the element 
existed ; he augmented its utility. The com- 
pass used by the mariners in the Mediter- 
ranean during the twelfth and thirteenth 
centuries was a very uncertain and unsatis- 
factory apparatus. It consisted only of a 
magnetic needle floating in a vase or basin 
by means of two straws on a bit of cork 
supporting it on the surface of the water. 
The compass used by the Arabians in the 
thirteenth century was an instrument of ex- 
actly the same description. Now the in- 
convenience and inefificiency of such an ap- 
paratus are obvious — the agitation of the 
ocean and the tossing of the vessel might 
render it useless in a moment. But Gioia 
placed the magnetized needle on a pivot, 
which permits it to turn to all sides with 
facility. Afterward it was attached to a 
card, divided into thirty-two points, called 
rose de vents, and then the box containing 



it was suspended in such a manner that, 
however the vessel might be tossed, it would 
always remain horizontal. — Electrical En- 
gineer. 



RIO JANEIRO DOCK SYSTEM. 



While it is understood that formal bids 
for the great system will not be called for 
until certain legislation can be had from the 
Brazilian Congress, which convenes in May, 
the matter has been determined upon in its 
general features. In some respects the leas- 
ing of these docks will be the greatest in- 
vestment afifair in Brazil in many years. In 
a general way the plan is simply to turn 
the management of the docks over to a syn- 
dicate, which will collect dockage and other 
charges and keep the system in repair in 
return for a stipulated rental, but what plan 
for regulating this rental will be adopted is 
yet to be decided. The company leasing the 
docks at Santos has found its business very 
profitable — the most profitable enterprise, 
indeed, in all South America — and competi- 
tion for the Rio Janeiro docks is likely to be 
very keen. It is understood to be a general 
policy of the present Government in Brazil 
to lease the public docks in all the ports of 
the country in which modern docks systems 
are being constructed. 

The first section of the great dock system 
at Rio Janeiro is coming nearer and nearer 
to completion. A total of 1700 meters, or 
1.056 miles, has been completed and accepted 
ijy the Government, this section including 
the modern warehouses and all other appli- 
ances needful for the economic management 
of such an institution. At present 400 meters, 
1312 feet, more of the dock is finished and 
ready to be turned over to the Government. 
Up to date the commission in charge of the 
construction of the docks has expended up- 
on the docks and approaches to the docks, 
including the Avenida Central in Rio Ja- 
neiro, a sum exceeding $57,000,000. The 
amount expended by the commission up to 
the time of its last financial statement on the 
docks proper, exclusive of the Avenida Cen- 
tral, was in round figures $44,660,000. The 
heavier part of the cost of the completed 
work is of course represented by these fig- 
ures. While the docks already completed 
are used to some extent by smaller Brazilian 
vessels, the general use of the system by the 
larger ships is likely to be postponed for 
some time, owing to the need of further 
dredging before the larger ships can safely 
make the trip to the completed portion. 



After a two years' voyage to Crozet the 
whaling bark Josephine is back at New Bed- 
ford, her home port, having taken in that 
time 13,000 pounds of whalebone, 500 bar- 
rels of sperm and 1000 barrels of whale oil. 
The season in Crozet was the worst in seven 
years, the Josephine doing Ijetter than any 
of the other ships. 



The four-masted schooner Florence How- 
ard, owned by the Atlantic Shipping Com- 
pany, was successfully launched at Stoning- 
ton, Conn., on August 4. Mrs. Florence 
Howard of Webster, Mass., aft<"r whom the 
vessel was named, christened licr. The 
Howard is 1400 tons burden. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, lyi 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 1^ Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 85 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., BufTalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Ofiice, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeeniansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Scemannischcr Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 

Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

Denmark. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 

Austria. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques V puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, I (Bar- 
celoneta) Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvetto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The Melbourne (Australia) Trades 
Hall Council is going to hold an in- 
dustrial convention, with the object 
of consolidating the wage-earners 
throughout Victoria. 

At a meeting of the Sydney (Aus- 
tralia) Labor Council recently it was 
decided to request all unionists to de- 
mand to be served by shop assistants 
wearing the union badge. 

A dispatch from Stockholm, dated 
September, 3 says that the Labor Fed- 
eration has decided to call off the 
general strike on Septemer 6, as the 
outcome of Government intervention. 
A restaurant keeper, in giving evi- 
dence before the Wages Board in 
Sydney, Australia, recently, said the 
cost of living had gone up nearly 50 
per cent during the last six years. 

The Rroken Hill (.Australia) Labor 
Federation is urging the necessity for 
holding a conference in Melbourne, 
with a view of bringing about the com- 
plete federation of all organized labor 
in Australia. 

Exclusive of seamen, the number of 
British workpeople reported as killed 
in the course of their employment 
during July was 213, an increase of 
26 as compared with June, and of 12 
as compared with a year ago. 

The arbitration undertaking bj' the 
Swedish Government to settle the dis- 
pute between the employers' union" 
and the Confederation of Labor has 
failed, chiefly on account of the pro- 
posal to settle future disputes by arbi- 
tration. 

Thirty girl weavers struck work at 
Torrenside Woollen Mills, Adelaide, 
recently, owing to a threatened reduc- 
tion in wages. The trouble was 
amicably settled in favor of the union 
girls after a couple of days' suspen- 
sion of labor. 

Labor is rapidly organizing in 
Japan, practically every trade or occu- 
pation now having its organization, 
the constant exchange of ideas among 
the wage-earners bringing also the 
power of organized effort and the 
knowledge of such power. 

The Swedish Government has inter- 
vened to settle the dispute between 
the employers' union and the Confed- 
eration of Labor, which was the cause 
of the recent general strike in Stock- 
holm. Arbitrators have been appointed 
for this purpose, as well as to draw 
up regulations for the settlement of 
future disputes by arbitration. 

Hans Back, employed in the shop of 
Andrew Bailey, butcher, of West 
Maitland, Australia, was proceeded 
against recently at the instance of 
Thomas James Waters, secretary of 
Newcastle branch of the Butchers' 
Shop Employes' Union, on a charge 
of breaking the award by commenc- 
ing work before 5:30 a. m. Judge 
Hayden fined defendant £2 with £3 
3s. costs, in default 14 days' hard la- 
bor. 

The annual report of the Registrar 
of Trade Unions in New South Wales 
shows that 25 new unions were regis- 
tered in that State during 1908, mak- 
ing the total number in existence 153, 
with a membership of 113,918 union- 
ists. Among the largest unions are 
the Australian Workers' Union, with 
22,472 members; the Colliery Em- 
ployes' Federation, with 8979; the 
Machine Shearers' Union, 5580; Rail- 
way and Tramway, 5171; and the Sea- 
men's, 4338. The wealthiest union is 
the Australian Workers' Union, with 
£10,581; followed by the Amalgamat- 
ed Miners' Association, with £8056. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LIPPMAN BROS. 

S32 BEACON & S31 FRONT, n*xt to Fritz & Emett 
SAN PEDRO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Union Goods for Union Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
AH goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to Inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for tlie seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loogvi labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Stfl., 

SAN PEDRO. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 



LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. S14 Beacon St. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., GPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. M UN SON 

Dealer In 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




Named shoes are frequently made In Non- 
Union factories. 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears a 
plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

Ail shoes without the UNION STAMP are 
always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence of 
the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Cha». L. Baine. Sec.-Treas. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Samuel England, age 48 years, com- 
municate with Seamen's Institute, 242 
Steuart street, San Francisco. 



James Sample, last heard of on ship 
Santa Rita in April, 1909, is inquired 
for i»y Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart 
street. 



CJHITBUSIEU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

AiGOMUTStf 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anders.son, Albin. 
Alander, O. J. 
Ammusen, Martin 
Anderson, A. 
Andersen, Hans J. 
Asplund, Emil 
Ander.sen, Harald 
Anderson, Henry 
Anderson, Oscar 
Axelsson, C B. 
Apps, P. 

Anderson, O. -1286 
Bray, J. K. 
Bensen, Ray 
Bausbach, Envin 
Bery, Charles 
Berger. Joe 
Berggren. G. -349 
Barrach, Herman 
Backinan, Adolf 
Bjorseth, Knut 
Bade. Alexander 
Berggren, John 
Bolander, J. E. 
Broback, Charles E. 
Bersin, Jacob 
Carlsson. N. 
Christensen, Harry 
Carlson, C. G. F. 
Christiansen, Hj. 
Carlsson, A. 
Capello, H. 
Carlson, Chas. 
Celley, Edward 
Christenson, John 
Ctiristian.sen. -901 
Colonibay, Louis 
Charlsen, Charlie 
Cainan, George 
Castro, Manuel 
Dahlman, J. A. 
Dories, J. H. 
Danielson. B. B. 

(Package) 
Englebright, Harry 
Ebapanen, W. 
Engbretsen, -668 
Erickinson. Eric 
EUingsen, F. 
Erickson. Charley 
Fredriksen, H. G. 

-529 
Folvig, John 
Fridlund, John 
Foldat, John 
Geiger, Josef 
Gustafson, Geo. 
Gray, Gustav 
Gliser. Walter 
Gulbrandsen, A. 
Gliese. W. 
Hazzal, S. G. 
Harmening, F. 
Holz, P. 
Heckman, Fred 
Holy, Otto -1764 
Huge, Arne 
Han.<<en, Bert 
Haupt. Emil 
Hansen, Haakon 
Hanson, Jacob 
Henriksen, Aug. E. 
Holm, Stephan 
Inghretsen, -668 
Ingebretsen, O. -125 
Johnson, F. -1911 
Jensen. J. -1801 
Johansen, C. -1191 
Jobson, Charles 
Jonsen. Thomas 
Johnson. G. E. 
Jeshke, H. 



Jeffersen, V. 
Jacobson, John 
Jensen, J. H. -1311 
Johannsen, Christian 
Jansolin, J. -1440 
Kalberg, W. -688 
Kattel. J. 
Karsberg, C. 
Knudsen, Billy 
Kruger, H. 
Lau, Gustav 
Lynd, Cliarley 
Larsen, Cliris 
Long, Harry 
Lange, Frederik 
Lunian, Alku 
Lawson, Jack 
Loeman, Charles 
Lund, Harry C. 
Lundstrom, Sam 
Lewis, G. 
Lactat, Victor 
Larsen, Marinius 
Mulley, James 
McMahon, John 
McFadden, W. 
Manning, W. 
Muller, Hugo 
Melin, Einar 
Nestor, Wilson 
Nielsen, Slvert 
Nielsen, J. A. -780 
Nurml, Victor 
Nyberg, Erik 
Newman, John 
Osterholm, -867 
Olsen, Adolf 
Olesen, Geo. 
Olsson. Erik 
Olsen, Oluf 
Orten, Sigurd 
Ohm, Gunvall 
Oustad, Hans 
Olson, Bertel 
Owens, Joseph IT. 
Peterson. Oscar C. 
Petersen, O. -864 
Peterson, F. G. 
Pagel, Erwin 
Pereitzes, H. 
Peratis, N. 
Paulsson. Adolf 
Panier, A. 
Passou, Teddy 
Petersen. W. -1284 
Peterson, Th. -563 
Raymond, J. 
Remmel, F. 
Hobsham, Jens W. 
Rodriquez, Manuel 
Rosan, Oscar 
Ruter, Herman 
Seller, Willy 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Slverberg, Harry 
Svendsen, Otto F. 
Smith, J. S. 
Sorensen, -1664 
Soderstrom, A. I. 
Scott, Ed 
Svedstrup, E. 
.Schlobies, Chas. 
Torres, Lojo. V. 
Torjussen, Gunvald 
Thorson, Tom 
Tillman, C. -763 
Vik. Jakob 
Vidal, Juan 
Wldin. Andrew 
Westad. Johan 
Yager. A. 
Zimmerman, F. C. 



S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



MSS-LWHD 



OVERALLS 

Neustadter Bros. 

-■lAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK PORTLAND 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



^i*^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




British bark Howard D. Troop arrived at As- 
toria on September 26, after a record-breaking 
trip of twenty days from Yokohama. 

Captain Charles Potter, one of the best known 
navigators in the trade between the Hawaiian 
Islands and San Francisco, died at his home in 
Alameda on September 23, aged 78 years. 

The British ship Ballasore, at San Francisco on 
October 1, 161 days from Hamburg, reports O. 
Christensen, sailmaker, died of heart disease. 
Deceased was a native of New York, aged 57 
years. 

The schooner Volante arrived at Seattle on 
September 20 from Point Barrow, bringing intel- 
ligence of the wreck of the schooner Ivy near that 
point. No lives were lost. The Volante brought 
?30,000 worth of furs and whalebone. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 29: Steamer A. K. Payson, John A. 
Hockey vice Eric Olson; barkentine Amazon, 
Rasmus Jacobsen vice David Oraff. 

The Coronado Company and the Centralia 
Company, both organized for the purpose of 
operating certain vessels now engaged in the 
coastwise trade, were incorporetad at San Fran- 
cisco on September 30. 

Two hundred thousand cases of canned salmon 
were brought by four salmon packets arriving at 
San Francisco on September 26 and 27. The ves- 
sels named are the bark George Curtis, the ship 
Bohemia, the ship Oriental and the bark Star of 
Peru. 

Captain Sibbald of the British steamship Scot- 
tish Monarch was arrested at Honolulu on Sep- 
tember 17 by the United States Marshal for hav- 
ing allowed three of his Chinese crew to escape 
on shore, in violation of the provisions of the 
Chinese Exclusion Act. 

Three salmon packets arrived at San Francisco 
on September 28. The Alaska Packers' barkentine 
Centennial, Captain Larsen, reached port twenty- 
six days from Naknek. Her cargo consisted of 
41,423 cases of salmon. The bark Paramita and 
the schooner Mizpah were the other arrivals. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 1: Steamer City of Topeka, L. N. 
Nopander, vice J. O. Feria; schooner Sophie E., 
Conrad Cheller, vice James T. Hull. The steamer 
Lansing, C. Alberts master, was enrolled. 

Word was received at San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 30 of the conviction of the captain of the 
Norwegian steamer Varg for illegally landing 
men at East Cape. The master was arrested by 
the officers of the United States revenue-cutter 
Bear and taken to Nome, where he was tried, 
convicted and fined $1500 for the ofifense. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 27; Schooner Rosella, Fred Haines, 
vice C. D. Haroldsen; steamer Modoc, Enos 
Fouratt, Jr., vice B. N. Rideout; steamer W. P. 
Fuller, J. J. Ortley, Jr., vice Oliver Ortley; 
steamer Cascade, Charles Maro, vice Knud Detlef- 
sen. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 25: Steamer Dixie, W. R. Osgood 
vice Charles T. Gillard; steamer Northland, C. M. 
Fagerlund vice A. Erickson; steamer Herald, 
George Fouratt, vice Enos Fouratt, Jr. r steamer 
James S. Higgins, Walter F. Higgins vice John 
A. Eleason. 

The catch of the five Victoria sealers up to 
September was 2500 sealskins and eighteen otter 
skins. The schooner Toyo Maru, in command 
of Captain Voss, who some years ago circum- 
navigated the world in a canoe, had the highest 
catch of the thirty-eight Japanese schooners in 
Behring Sea, having 1065 skins. The others aver- 
aged from 300 to 400 sealskins. 

Following quickly upon the cut in passenger 
rates made by the Pacific Coast Steamship Com- 
pany in its effort to drive the steamer St. Croix 
of Schubach & Hamilton from the run between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles, the West Coast 
Company, operating a number of steam- 
schooners, has announced first-class rates one 
way of $1.50 and second class of $L 

The following changes of masters were record- 
ed at the San Francisco Custom-house on Septem- 
ber 18: Steamer Captain Weber, N. P. Nelson 
vice George H. Goodell; schooner Redwood City, 
Charles Herliky vice Adolf Frieberg; steamer 
Governor, H. C. Thomas vice Rasmus Jepsen; 
steamer Apache, J. A. Casson vice William A. 
Elsassen. 

Bringing 261 passengers and $180,000 in gold 
the steamer Victoria, which arrived at Seattle on 
September 19, lowered the sailing time from 
Nome to Puget Sound, making the trip in seven 
days and eighteen hours. With the treasure ship- 
ment on the Victoria the gold brought from the 
Seward Peninsula to Seattle this vear totals near- 
ly $3,000,000. 

The dockage facilities of the coast of British Co- 
lumbia will be increased by a drydock, which will 
have a capacity of 10,000 tons. The contract for 
the dock, which will be 510 feet long, 70 feet wide 
and 30 feet draft over the sill, has been given 



to a firm which will build the dock in England 
and ship it to Vancouver in parts. The dock 
will be located in Vancouver. 

The Matson Navigation Company received a 
cablegram on September 18 from Newport News 
stating that the steamship Wilhemina was 
launched at that place on that day. The Wil- 
hclmina will run between San Francisco and the 
Hawaiian Islands. She arrived at the former port 
on February 1 and Captain Johnson of the Hilo- 
nian will take charge of her. 

Credited with the fastest passage of the season 
from Alaskan waters and bringing the largest car- 
go of salmon yet received, the Alaska Packers' 
bark Star of Alaska, Captain Halverson, arrived 
at San Francisco on September 24. She made 
the passage from Chignik in eleven days, which 
is remarkably fast time. The Star of Alaska's 
cargo was 71,799 cases of salmon and fifty-five bar- 
rels of salmon. 

War in earnest has been declared on the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company by Schubach & Hamil- 
ton, of Seattle, which firm on September 24 pub- 
lished a first-class rate of $6.35 from San Fran- 
cisco to Los Angeles on the steamer St. Croix. 
The rate is a cut of $3 under that declared by the 
Pacific Coast Company some days previously 
when it was announced that the St. Croix would 
be put on the southern run. 

Sir Thomas Shaughnessy, president of the Ca- 
nadian Pacific Railroad, announces that his line 
will immediately take steps to place new vessels 
on the Oriental run from Vancouver. The Em- 
press of Britain and Empress of Ireland may be 
brought from the Atlantic, or new steamers may 
be built specially for the Pacific trade; but a de- 
cision one way or the other will be made very 
shortly. 

The United States Inspectors at Seattle have 
issued their finding in tlie hearing of the evidence 
of the wreck of the steamer Ohio of the Alaska 
Steamship Company, exonerating Captain John- 
son, Pilot Snow and all the officers of the Ohio, 
and express the conviction that if it had not been 
for the good judgment shown by Captain Johnson 
and the discipline and energy of the crew many 
lives would have been lost. 

The Norwegian steamer Tordenskjold, which 
carries coal from Nanaimo to San Francisco, has 
been ordered held up by the local Steamship In- 
spectors because of the condition of her boilers 
and furnaces. Two months' work will be done 
on the collier by the Moore & Scott Iron Works, 
including the installation of a new furnace, new 
front heads on the boilers and two new line 
shafts. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 28: Schooner Magnolia, Isak Isaksnn 
vice John Bates; steamer Glencoe, Charles T. 
Gillard vice J. E. Woodside; schooner Verbena, 
Eugene Lynch vice Jens C. Andersen. The 
schooner Crescent, T. Olson, master, and the 
schooner Ruby, W. Meins, master, were en- 
rolled. 

An interesting sailing race between the barken- 
tincs Koko Head and Lahaina from Vancouver 
to Sydney, Australia, will begin early this month. 
The vessels are now loading lumber at the Has- 
tings mill and will complete their cargoes and get 
away within a few days of each other. Both will 
carry the same amount of cargo, so that the con- 
ditions of the race will be more equal than is 
usually the case in a contest between two sailing 
vessels. Hind, Rolph & Co. of San Francisco 
are the owners of the two carriers. The Koko 
Head was built in 1902 at Oakland, and her sister- 
ship at the same yard the previous year. 

Several vessels well known on the Pacific are 
reported to have been acquired by foreigners. 
On the list is the iron four-masted bark Vanduara. 
1916 tons register. She was built in 1882 at 
Glasgow and was purchased by the Norwegians 
for about $15,000. Another is the bark Lota, built 
at Glasgow in 1893. She realized about the same 
price at auction and will be transferred to Nor- 
wegian register. The iron four-masted bark 
Mariechen, which has been lying at Hamburg for 
some time, has been sold by order of the court 
for 67,000 marks, and the iron ship Bramblctyc, 
1472 tons register, is also reported as having been 
sold for about $10,000. 



To Mariners: You will please take notice that 
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 
has installed and is maintaining between San 
Pedro and Terminal Island, one (1) subaqueous 
telephone and telegraph cable, 750 feet in length. 
That at said points said company will rnaintain 
monuments indicating the place where said cable 
lies. Do not drop anchor at these points. San 
Pedro, Cal., December, 1907. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass, 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377 A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 50 Union St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 Bast Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wi.s., 213 Banks Ave. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 305 French St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 63 East Kinzie St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 .ludson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Eraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

I'AUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montlis - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of eacli week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Pestofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San t'rancisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAI.,, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAI., is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1909. 



SHIPS AND RAILROADS. 



Tlie Ship Subsidy t|uc.stion is again very 
much to the fore. President Taft, in his 
Seattle speech, promised U) recommend to 
Congress the passage of legislation for the 
relief of the American merchant marine. 
However, Mr. Taft, like his predecessors in 
office, was careful not to specify the particu- 
lar measures in mind, probably because he has 
no definite views on the subject. This attitude 
of indefinitcness is characteristic of the whole 
discussion on the subject of Ship Subsidy. 
Everybody favors the "rehabilitation of the 
American merchant marine." I>ut unanimity 
ends with the utterance of this mouth-filling 
plirase. Wlien it comes to ways and means of 
securing the desired object there are as many 
opinions as there are advocates. The reason 
for this disagreement is not far to seek. The 
scheme of Ship Subsidies is essentially selfish ; 
it is a scheme to further j)rivate interests, 
ratlier than ])ublic good ; consequently, any 
plan which is calculated to benefit one element 
of the shipping industry inevitably arouses op- 
position among other elements. 

It has been contended in these columns that 
the absence of profit in many shijiping enter- 
prises is due to the attitude of the railroad 
corporations. The railroads take to themselves 
the bulk of the freight and passage payments, 
leaving to the shipi)ing end of the transporta- 
tion business only so much as is absolutely 
necessary to keep the siiips afloat, and fre- 
quently not even that much. A striking con- 
firmation of this view is given in a recent 
statement made by W. R. Wheeler, formerly 
A.ssistant Secretary of Commerce and Labor. 
Speaking at San Francisco on the 1st inst., 
Mr. Wheeler said : 

Not long ago a maij ventured to establish an 
independent steamship line between New York 
and Galveston, and it at once became a question 
whether he would be able to run, the opposition 
rates went so low. He was trying to compete 
with a steamship line owned by a competing rail- 
road. It is always so where a railroad is allowed 
to operate in conjunction with a competitive 
steamship line. 

The Pacific, Coast Stcaniship Company is 
owned, or dominated, by the Hill interests. 



There is no use of mincing words here, where 
we arc all in a family. You may ask why Hill 
runs a steamship line to San Francisco when he 
lias no railroad here. The answer is that San 
Francisco is the supply point for Puget Sound in 
competition with St. Paul. 

Why does the Pacific Mail run a line of vessels 
to Panama? Is it to build up the merchant 
marine of the country, or to promote the interests 
of the .American flag on the seas? No; it is to 
|)rotect the transcontinental railroad lines. It is 
as a protection against competition and to keep 
the rates where they are. 

As a prerequisite to tiic upbuilding of a mer- 
chant marine, you want first to make competition 
exist on the water, and not with the water. Pro- 
tect tlie local or domestic trade, and if that can 
be allowed to grow, from it may arise a deter- 
mined effort to branch out into the world trade, 
which will be successful. 

There should be an amendment to the Inter- 
state Commerce -Act, making it unlawful for a 
railroad to own, operate or be interested in com- 
peting steamship lines. That will give the man 
who wants to engage in the coastwise trade a 
ciiance, and after that will come greater things. 

This statement, which is undoubtedly cor- 
rect, quite clearly conveys the inference that 
any subsidy which might be granted by Con- 
gress would be unavailing for the purpose of 
increasing shipping, since it would be absorbed 
by the railroad end of the respective corpora- 
tions. As Mr. Wheeler says, the trouble lies 
not in comjietition between ships, but in com- 
petition between ships and railroads. 

As to jjrotection for the coastwise trade, 
that trade is already fully protected, at least 
in the matter of competition with foreign 
shipping. Whether as a result of this pro- 
tection or not, tlic fact remains that American 
shipping (including the coastwise and Lake 
trade), is second only to that of Great Brit- 
ain in amount of tonnage. This fact is lost 
sight of entirely by those who assert that 
the I'nited States Navy (also accredited 
with second place in point of strength) 
would be handicapped in time of war by 
reason of the lack of coal siiips and other 
au.xiliary craft. 

It is noticeable tliat in the recent discussion 
of the Ship Subsidy question no mention is 
made of the feature of personnel. (Jriginally 
this was the feature most strongly emi)hasized. 
Subsidies were advocated not so much for the 
purpose of increasing the number of ships as 
for the purpose of increasing the number of 
seamen — American seamen — who should be 
available as a reserve force for the Navy. It 
will be recalled that in spite of this argument 
none of the Ship Subsidy bills introduced at 
any time has contained a single provision tcnil- 
ing to this end : that, on the contrary, every 
attempt to secure the insertion of such pro- 
visions has been strenuously, and successfully, 
opposed by the prospective beneficiaries of the 
stibsidies. Whether sincere or insincere in 
their advocacy of "American ships, owned by 
.American citizens and manned by American 
seamen," it remains true that only upon the 
ground of an improvement in the numbers and 
efficiency of the crews of American ships can 
the proponents of Ship Subsidies hope to be 
successful in their appeal to the country. 



The maritime craft should not be behind 
any other branch of labor in assisting the 
members of the garment-making industry in 
their struggle against .Asiatic and sweatshop 
labor. Demand the Garment Workers' label 
when jnirchasing suits, shirts, overalls, etc. 



'llie union lalx.! is Labor's most effective 
weapon. Demand it at all times. 



LABOR L\ THE ISLANDS. 



The problem of "Americanizing" the Ha- 
waiian Islands has long been a subject of dis- 
cussion in the United States. Indeed, that 
c|uestion was di.scussed before the annexation 
of the Islands, in 1898, the difficulties in that 
connection being regarded by many as a 
serious objection to the policy of annexation. 
Subsecjuent events have demonstrated the 
soundness of the position that territory lying 
within the tropics can not be ".Americanized" 
in the sense of being made habitable by the 
-American people. Additional light is cast 
upon the subject by the expressions of cer- 
tain members of the National Immigration 
Commission, who recently returned to San 
l-'rancisco from a visit to the Islands. Com- 
missioner William R. Wheeler sums up the 
situation in the following terms : 

The Immigration question in the Hawaiian 
Islands is as yet in a rather complex state, but 
the people down there are striving earnestly and 
strenuously to get it into satisfactory shape, and 
I have no doubt that they will be successful in 
the near future. 

We visited the three large islands, Oahu, Maui 
and Hawaii, and came in contact with the lead- 
ing men of these places. It is the Japanese labor 
problem with which the Islanders are most 
vitally interested and which they arc taking steps 
to solve, .\t present there are 78,000 Japanese 
f>n the Islands, which is over 50 per cent of the 
population. 

It is this fact and the possibility of an increase 
that has convinced the people that the Islands 
must be Americanized as rapidly as possible. We 
were agreeably surprised to find the broad public 
spirit in this regard that we did. There is a 
feeling that the increase of the Oriental popula- 
tion along its recent lines must be stopped. 

In the effort to secure white labor agents 
have been sent to Russia and the .Azores, from 
which fields it is hoped to recruit the labor 
needed on the plantations. The expense in- 
volved in this procedure is <lefrayed by a tax 
of 2 per cent upon the owners of property ex- 
ceeding $4000 in value, 75 per cent of which 
goes to the local Immigration I)Oard and 25 
per cent to the reclamation of lands and irri- 
gation. The Commissioners also report that 
steps are being taken to divide the land into 
sinall tracts and to vary the products of the 
soil by planting pineajjples, tobacco, cotton and 
other staples. The Immigration Commission- 
ers express themselves as hopeful of the suc- 
cess of the.se measures. Whatever the out- 
come, it is quite evident that in their present 
condition as to population the Hawaiian 
Islands are a white (or rather brown and 
yellow ) elephant on the hands of the United 
States. As things now stand, the best that 
can be .said for the Islands is that they serve 
as a valuable object-lesson of the dangers of 
Asiatic immigration to the mainland. What 
has already taken place in the Islands would 
ju.st as certainly take place in California in 
event that the existing restrictions upon 
.Asiatic immigration be not maintained and ex- 
tended. 



The labor movement of the United States 
will l)e represented in spirit, if not in person, 
in the reception to be tendered at Washington 
to IVesident Gompers upon his return from 
Europe. We congratulate Brother Gompers 
and wish him tiie fullest personal benefit from 
his trip. 



Demand the Hatters' label when buying a 



hat. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



"Chinatown s(iiiad" is an iridescent dream. Sani- 
tary conditions are unspeakable and sanitary reg- 
ulations are unenforceable. Religion is repre- 
sented by joss houses, where the coolie wor- 
shiper seeks which god will most cheaply grant 
his prayer for a winning lottery ticket. 

There are decent men in Chinatown, but no 
moral leaders, and no civic sentiment, to enforce 
any moral obligations but business ones. These 
are absolute, and every Chinese pays all his debts 
by the time of the annual New Year festivities. 
Superstition is universal and gross, and the nu- 
merous devils are the only power feared, except 
the tongs. Dead men are greatly honored, but a 
dying man is thrust into the dead-house to starve, 
supplied with opium, but with nothing else. Chi- 
nese clothing, food, customs and standards are 
universal, and a Californian Chinatown is simply 
a miniature section of Canton, transported bodily. 
The Chinese are not part of American life, and 
conform to American standards only in the single 
respect of recognizing the obligation of a business 
contract. 

The Japanese in the beginning congregate on 
the borders of Chinatown, but they build better 
and cleaner houses and admit some air to them. 
They adopt American clothing at once, and 
American customs very rapidly. As they grow in 
numbers and prosperity, they provide themselves 
with recreation — good and bad. They go to the 
Chinese gambling houses and to the Buddhist 
temples and Christian missions. Pool and billiard 
rooms, with their good and bad points, are lib- 
erally patronized. The general aspect of life is 
cheerful and attractive, and the Japanese them- 
selves, from the highest to the lowest, arc a de- 
lightfully polite and genial people. Even the 
"cockyness" that has followed the Russian war 
has not obliterated their personal likableness. In 
every relation but a business one they are charm- 
ing. They develop a civic sense, public spirit, and 
moral leadership. When the Chinese o-ambling. 
joints debauch the Japanese young men, the 
Buddhist priest, the Christian missionary and the 
president of the Japanese Reform Association call 
on the mayor to protest. But when asked whether 
the Japanese houses of prostitution should not 
be suppressed also, they shake their heads. Pros- 
titution is a most characteristic Japanese industry, 
and there appears to be no moral sentiment 
against it. The women themselves are under less 
social ostracism than the women of corresponding 
class of other races, and they appear also to be 
less personally degraded. You see no obscene 
pictures and no flaunting of vulgarity in a Japa- 
nese house of prostitution. In some places, these 
facts are giving the Japanese an approximate 
monopoly of this evil. 

But the Japanese do not confine themselves to 
"Japtown," nor permit the white man to determine 
the limits of their residence. They buy up town 
and country property, and wherever they settle 
the white man moves out. In Sacramento they 
have completely occupied what was formerly one 
of the best business districts. The process is 
simple. A Japanese buys a fine corner location, 
paying for it whatever price he must. Then he 
gets all the rest of the block very cheaply, for the 
white owners and tenants will not stay. In the 
countr}', wherever the Japanese rent or buy land 
in any ((uantities. white men evacuate. The Vaca 
Valley, one of the richest and most beautiful spots 
in California, is the most notable example. Similar 
beginnings have been made elsewhere. In busi- 
ness they do not confine themselves to their own 
people. In Fowler, California, for instance, one 
of the leading department stores, doing a general 
business with Americans, is owned by Sumida 
Bros. In San Francisco there is a Japanese daily 
newspaper, w-ith a modern plant and a large cir- 
culation and business. It was the first newspaper 
in San Francisco to resume publication with its 
own building and plant after the fire. 

The Japanese are energetic, versatile and adapt- 
able. Many of them attend the high schools and 
universities, to secure a first-class American edu- 
cation. These students fretiuently work, after 
hours, as house servants in American families, 
partly to sui)port themselves and partly to sup- 
plement their American academic education with 
an American domestic education. As servants 
they are intelligent, accommodating, competent 
and unstable. As in everything else, their one 
weakness is their failure to recognize the obliga- 
tion of a contract. They will leave, without 
notice or consideration, on the slightest provoca- 
tion. Chinese servants, such of them as there are 
left, are more generally professional serxants, who 
make the work a permanent business, and expect 
high wages. 

Magnify these conditions indefinitely, and it is 
not hard to foresee the result of any general ad- 
mission of immigrants of either race. Chinese 
will not assimilate with American life, and Ameri- 
cans refuse to assimilate with Japanese. The 
great danger of the "yellow peril" is its enormous 
size. With less than two million white men in 
California, and more than four hundred million 
Chinese in China, just across the way, the very 
smallest overflow from that limitless reservoir 
W'ould swamp nur Pacific Coast. If it is impos- 
sible for two million white men, in an .Xmericm 
State, to enforce .American laws on a dwindling 
few thousand Chinese, American institutions 
would be simply obliterated by any considerable 
influx of Chinese. A very few years of unre- 



stricted Chinese immigration would leave Cali- 
fornia, American only in the sense in which Hong- 
kong is English. Fortunately, on this question, 
American policy is fixed, and is for the present in 
our hands. China is powerless to protest, whether 
we deal justly or unjustly, and the dwindling 
remnant of Chinese present few occasions for 
personal or diplomatic friction. The Chinese 
problem is easy, so long as our present policy 
continues. Under any other policy, it would 
straightway overwhelm us. No possible immediate 
industrial demand could justify letting down the 
bars to Chinese immigration in even the slightest 
degree. Those industries which cannot be de- 
veloped and those resources which cannot be ex- 
ploited without Chinese labor must simply be left 
undeveloped and unexploited — unless we are will- 
ing to sacrifice American civilization permanently 
to industrial exploitation temporarily, on the 
whole Pacific Coast. 

The Chinese problem is approaching its end, 
unless we reopen it. The Japanese problem is 
only beginning, and the end is not wholly within 
our control. For the present, there are no more 
Japanese in the country than we can safely utilize, 
and the number, under the restrictive policy of 
Japan, appears to be decreasing. This is excellent, 
so long as it lasts. But it can last, in peace and 
amity, only so long as Japan wills, and Japanese 
sensitiveness constantly tends to magnify the 
smallest provocations into international issues. 
Industrially, we can utilize some Japanese, but 
internationally we cannot guarantee even one 
Japanese against the .possible chances of Ameri- 
can hoodlumism. With the i*sue, not proljably 
of peace (for war is the remotest of contin- 
gencies), but of amity in the hands of any rowdy 
boy who chooses to smash a Japanese window, 
the present Japanese exclusion arrangement is in 
the unstablest equilibrium. A momentary wave of 
demagogy, in Japanese politics, a chance street 
light in the San Francisco slums, and the whole 
agreement might be jeopardized. Then we should 
be forced to the alternative of Japanese exclusion 
by our own initiative, with all its difficulties and 
possibilities of complication. 

But let no American who realizes what it would 
mean to the South to turn back the wheels of his- 
tory and decree that there should never have been 
a race problem there, consider for a moment the 
possibility of importing another and harder one 
on our Pacific Coast. There is no right way to 
solve a race problem except to stop it before it 
begins. Every possible solution of the Negro 
problem is a wrong one, but we can at least let 
each generation determine which wrong it will 
commit, and fake the conse(iucnces, with respect 
to that permanently impossible problem. No such 
possibility opens with respect to a race problem 
where the other race would determine its own 
view of its own rights, and be backed by a power- 
ful and jealous nation in maintaining them. The 
Pacific Coast is the frontier of the white man's 
world, the culmination of the westward migration 
which is the white man's wdnole history. It will 
remain the frontier so long as we guard it as 
such; no longer. Unless it is maintained there, 
there is no other line at which it can be main- 
tained without more effort than American govern- 
ment and American civilization are able to sus- 
tain. The multitudes of Asia are already awake, 
after their long sleep, as the multitudes of Eu- 
rope were when our present flood of continental 
immigration began. We know what could happen, 
on the Asiatic side, by wdiat did happen and is 
hai)pening on the European side. On that side 
we have survived, and such of the immigration as 
we have not assimilated for the present we know 
is assimilable in the future. But against Asiatic 
immigration we could not survive. "The numbers 
who would come would be greater than we could 
encyst, and the races who would come are those 
which we could never absorb. The permanence 
not merely of American civilization, l)Ut of the 
white race on this continent, depends on our not 
doing, on the Pacific side, what we have done 
on the Atlantic Coast. For the present, the situ- 
ation as to both Chinese and Japanese immigra- 
tion is satisfactory. But to relax the present 
policy, even for a brief interval, would be to load 
ourselves with .a burden which all eternity could 
not again throw off and all our vitality could not 
withstand. There is no other possiule national 
menace at all to be compared with this. 



The contract for salvaging the cargo and hull 
of the steamer Ohio, wrecked in Finlayson Chan- 
nel, was awarded to the Vancouver Dredging and 
Salvage Company on September 20. The agree- 
ment for the working of the cargo of 1800 tons 
was entered into with the San Francisco Under- 
writers. The contract covering the hull was 
executed with the London Salvage Association. 
Work was started last week on the cargo and 
then attention will be given to the hull. 



The following changes of masters were regis- 
tered at the San Francisco Custom-house on Sc])- 
tember 22: Steamer Phoenix, Charles Matsen 
\ice H. G. Hansen; steamer Brooklyn, H. G. Han- 
sen vice Axel Henriksen; sloop Ida, John Daliet- 
to vice F. G. Condari; steamer State Reulien L. 
Ilolman vice R. M. Dixon; steamer Sea Foam, 
Axel Henrikson vice Bertimus Lee; steamer Yel- 
lowstone, J. G. Ludlow vice Charles Reiner; 
steamer .'Mcatraz, E. Wirschauleit \ice John EL 
lesscn. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, October 4, 1909. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7:30 p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secre- 
tary reported shipping medium. Quarterly 
Finance Committee reported having examined 
the Union's accounts for the third quarter and 
havmg found same correct. The second install- 
ment of the International Assessment for the 
benefit of the affiliated Unions on strike on the 
Great Lakes was ordered paid. 

Notice: Nominees for delegates to the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union convention who desire 
to become candidates must so notify the Ballot 
Committee at Headquarters not later than Octo- 
ber 8, 1909. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary 

44-46 East St., Phone Kearny 2228. 

Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 27, 1909. 
General situation good. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365, 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 27, 1909. 
No meeting; no (|uorum. Shipping medium; 
prospects fair. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 27, 1909. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 

4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 27, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229;/ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 21, 1909. 
Shipping slack; prospects better. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 62. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Sept. 27, 1909. 
Shipping good. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 25, 1909. 
.\o meeting; no quorum. Shipping good; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 27, 1909. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O, Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 21, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San F'rancisco, Sept. 30, 1909. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Ed. .'Kndersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slack, plenty of men ashore. A 
Quarterly Finance Committee was elected to go 
over the finances of the Union for the past quar- 
ter. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
Phone Kearny 5955, 



Seattle .Agency, Sept. 23, 1909. 
No meeting; shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency. Sept. 24, 1909. 
No meeting; shipping medium; few men ashore. 
Prospects fair. 

ED. BARRY, Agent, 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Hcad(iuarters, Chicago, Sept. 27, 1909. 
Strike situation satisfactory. 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

674 West Madison St. 



DIED. 

Olaf Emil Hagberg, No. 1920, a native of 
Sweden, aged 'S2. died at Fort Stillacoom, Wash., 
on August 26, 1909. 

Viuor Newman, No. 615, a native of Russia, 
aged 67. died at San I'rancisco, Cal., on September 
,10, 1909. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^^'^ 



ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



#^>S^ 



WILSON AT BUFFALO. 



Saint Brigid's Hall in Louisiana street was 
crowded to capacity yesterday (September 
19) afternoon by 1,000 striking marine en- 
gineers, firemen and seamen to hear Joseph 
riavlock Wilson, a member of the British 
Parliament from Middlebro, Eng., and Presi- 
dent of the National Sailors & Firemen's 
Union of Great Britain, denounce the ".so- 
called welfare plan of the Lake Carriers' As- 
sociation as a copy of the notorious Shipping 
Federation of Great Britain." 

It was a gathering of the men who have 
been on strike on the Lakes for the last five 
months against the announced "Open-Shop" 
policy of the vesselowners, and who were 
cheered last week with the announcement 
that $50,000 had been voted to help their 
fight by the International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Edward Stack, President of the ATarine 
Firemen's Union, was chairman, and others 
on the stage were W. H. Frazier of Boston, 
Secretary-Treasurer of the International 
Seamen's Union ; V. A. Olander of Chicago, 
General Secretary of the Lake Seamen's Un- 
ion; Michael Casey, Secretary of the Marine 
Firemen's Union; William Jenkins of Con- 
neaut, chairman of the Lake District griev- 
ance committee of the seamen ; John Cole- 
man, business agent of the United Trades 
and Labor Council ; Charles Stevens, head of 
the cigarmakers' union, and other local lead- 
ers. Father James A. Lanigan, rector of 
Saint Brigid's Church, was also present. 

Mr. Wilson is one of the oldest labor mem- 
bers of Parliament and has carried on the 
work in the British House of the late Samuel 
Plimsoli, originator of the Plimsoll line, 
which i)rc)hibits vessels from loading deeper 
than the mark indicated and has reduced the 
lo.ss of life from 3,500 annually in 1885 to 
less than 1,000 annually now. 

"This welfare plan, so-called, which the 
Lake Carriers are trying to enforce on these 
Lakes," said Mr. Wilson, "is worse by far 
than the notorious Shipping Federation of 
Great Britain. We have been fighting it 
over there for the last eighteen years, and I 
l)r()phesy that we will win inside to twelve 
months." 

The speaker reviewed the history of their 
strike and explained the workings of the 
British Federation scheme. "In 1885 the 
wages of the British seamen had reached the 
lowest point in twenty years," he said. 
"They were $12.50 a month. I organized the 
National Sailors & Firemen's Union in 1887, 
and the wages were brought up to $25 and 
$27 a month. The formation of the Shipping 
Federation, Ltd., a combine of all the bhip- 
owners, followed, and sailors were compelled 
to join. After eighteen years the British 
shipowners declare that white sailors and 
firemen are such a drunken, disorderly lot 
that they are compclied to employ China- 
men, Lascars and Hindoos. 

"After spending millions of dollars, the 
shipping Federation has been a flat failure, 
and I predict that if the same system pre- 
vails on the Lakes, Mr. Colby and his friends 
will discover to their sorrow that they have 
been fighting a shadow. They may get 
cheaper labor, but it will be dear labor. 

"The abuses of the Federation svstem are 



many. Agents extort graft from sailors for 
jobs ; men are compelled to submit to a 
physical examination by shipowners' doc- 
tors, and they are the subject of blacklist- 
ing, which wrecks their chances for employ- 
ment. The continuous discharge book con- 
tains a record of a sailor's services on all 
ships. Once a man gets a black mark, 
whether it is just or not, he may as well 
quit the Lakes, and he has no record if he 
sought employment on the coast, as the own- 
ers hold the book. 

"The Shipping Federation, after failing to 
crush the .seamen, tried to ruin me financial- 
ly, believing that they could thereby drive 
me out of the House of Commons. After 
eighteen years, do I look like a crushed man? 
(Cries of "No, no.") The Federation, in con- 
spiracy with the* seamen's boarding-house 
keepers, put me in jail for six weeks, sold my 
furniture and effects, brought me into bank- 
ruptcy court, but, in spite of all, I am still 
fighting, and we will win in another twelve 
months. 

"The ])urpo.se of the Lake Carriers is to 
destroy your organization and then they'll 
take care of your wages. This is the most 
important struggle in your history, and if the 
employers succeed in their welfare scheme, 
you might as well bid good-by to your or- 
ganization and your present wages. The sea- 
men of the world are with you in this fight 
and you can depend on their support." 

All through his talk the speaker was in- 
terrupted with cheers and when he finished, 
men jumped to the platform to shake his 
hand. 

Secretary Frazier of Boston, who am- 
nounced the donation of $50,000, said : "The 
seamen of two coasts consider this as much 
their fight as the men on the Lakes. We 
will win." 

John Coleman said : "Organized labor 
of Bufifalo and Erie County is with you and 
ready and willing to do all it can to help in 
this struggle against one of the greatest or- 
ganizations of capital in the country." 

The party will leave Buffalo this morning 
for a tour of the Lakes, stopping at Cleve- 
land, Toledo, Detroit, Chicago and Mil- 
waukee. — Buffalo Express. 



RULES FOR PASSING CANAL. 



The following instructions have just been 
issued by J. W. LeB. Ro.ss, superintending 
engineer of the Canadian Canal at Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ont. : ".Ml vessels using this canal 
must take their turn, and if traffic becomes 
congested so that there is not room at the 
piers for all waiting vessels the latest arriv- 
ing vessels must come to anchor in the river 
until there is room for them in the entrance. 
No vessel must attempt to pass or take the 
turn of any vessel so waiting at anchor ex- 
cepting those which have the right of way, 
according to rule 24 of the canal regulations, 
or small vessels which may lock with large 
ones, but must come to anchor and await 
their turn. Captains are requested to report 
to the office in writing when any other ves- 
sel breaks this rule. A fine will be im- 
posed upon all vessels neglecting to follow 
these regulations." 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



MORE LAKE ACCIDENTS. 



Port Huron, Sept. 18. — When the Mutual 
line Lackawanna, bound down, loaded with 
flour, copper and shingles, was abreast of the 
upper Grand Trunk freight sheds this morn- 
ing, at 11 o'clock, her steering cable parted 
and she took a sheer between the steamer 
Shenandoah and the barge Chieftain, which 
were bound up. The strong current swept 
the Lackawanna down the river broadside, 
and Chieftain collided with the Lackawanna, 
hitting her on the starboard side abreast of 
No. 3 gangway, breaking a large number of 
plates. 

The Lackawanna started to fill, and with 
the assistance of the tug Reed, which was 
near when the collision happened, the Lacka- 
wanna was pushed over on the middle 
ground of the Canadian side abreast of 
Lynn's office, where she sunk. 

Her upper decks are out of water. The 
Reed Wrecking Company have the steamer 
Manistique alongside of her making an ex- 
amination of the damage. The Chieftain's 
Stem is broken off from the tip of the rail to 
below the water. She also has a large num- 
ber of planks broken. Repairs will be made 
here. 

James Davidson, owner of the Chieftain, 
and W. E. Lloyd, manager of the Mutual 
line, will be here in the morning to look 
after their interests. The Lackawanna is 
owned by the Lake Transit Company of 
Buffalo, and is being operated by the Mutual 
Transit Company under charter. A steam 
pump has been placed aboard the wrecked 
ship. 



Detroit, Sept. 16. — The steamer Oliver, 
that has been aground at Walpole Island 
since Sunday night, has been released and 
passed down this afternoon. 

After lightering about 150 tons of ore the 
barge Nasmyth was released from New York 
shoal at Amherstburg to-day. She is lying 
at Bar Point, waiting to be picked up by a 
downward Steel Trust steamer. 



Sault Ste. Marie, Sept. 16. — As the steamer 
Pathfinder with the barge Sagamore was 
leaving the canal upbound, the latter took a 
sheer, crashing into the steamer Maruba, 
downbound. The Maruba's starboard bow 
was stove in by the force of the collision. 
Both vessels proceeded, the injuries not be- 
ing serious enough to detain them. 

The steamer W. W. Brown arrived here 
this afternoon and is tied up with a disabled 
air pump. Temporary repairs will be made. 
Vessels were delayed by a heavy fog last 
night and this morning. 



Detroit, Sept. 13. — A thick fog which 
came up suddenly at midnight Sunday 
caused five strandings in the Detroit and St. 
Clair Rivers and furnished plenty of work 
for the tugs. The tug Flome Rule also got 
a towline in her wheel and is temporarily 
disabled. 

The big steamer City of Cleveland ground- 
ed on the east bank of the river just above 
.Amherstburg and was released by the tug 
1 larding. The steamer is not injured. The 
little steamer Adiramled and the barge Dob- 
bins grounded on Bois Blanc Island, across 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



from Amherstburg, and were freed by the 
tug Trotter. 

The big barge Nasmyth, loaded with ore 
and in tow of the steamer Corona, went on 
New York shoal, abreast of Amherstburg, 
and lightering may be necessary. The tug 
Colton is on the way from Toledo, and Ma- 
rine Superintendent Smith of the Pittsburg 
Steamship Company is expected in the 
morning. 

The steamer Henry W. Oliver is on the 
head of Walpole Island, opposite Algonac, 
St. Clair River. Two of Reid's tugs have 
been at work on her and the tug Harding 
has gone up the river. The steamer Captain 
Thomas Wilson of the same fleet as the 
Oliver is expected to stop on her way up and 
help in releasing her sister-ship. The steam- 
er Francis Wildar was on near the City of 
Cleveland for a time, but she worked herself 
free. 



Port Huron, Sept. 16. — The Reed wreck- 
ing tugs Ottawa, Reed and Manistique suc- 
ceeded in releasing the steamer Oliver this 
morning at 10 o'clock from the head of Wal- 
pole Island. The steamers Wilson and Yu- 
ma, with the tugs Winslow and Reed, pulled 
on the Oliver yesterday and failed to move 
her. The Oliver left for Cleveland. 

The steamer Choctaw is lying down river 
making repairs to her steering gear. 

The steamer P. P. Miller, loaded with ore, 
is aground at the entrance to Pluron har- 
bor. Tugs could not release the steamer and 
she will have to lighter. The tug H. D. 
Goulder left for Detroit yesterday for the 
lighter Wayne, and part of the cargo will 
be taken off. 



EXPERIENCE WITH LIGHTNING. 



An interesting experience with lightning 
striking a vessel is given in the Hydrograph- 
ic Bulletin under date of September 8 by 
Captain W. H. LaFleur, master of Pere 
Marquette carferry No. 20. The incident oc- 
curred on August 4, while the boat was head- 
ed for Manitowoc. 

"I was standing at the engine-room tele- 
graphs, near the front part of the bridge and 
within four or five feet of the spar, when the 
lightning struck the ship," says Captain La- 
Fleur. "I felt a sharp pain in my left shoul- 
der, which was almost drenched by the rain 
beating and soaking through my oili^kin coat, 
my left side being dry, and I must have been 
spun around, for when I recovered my wits 
I was facing aft instead of forward and I ex- 
perienced a severe dizziness for a few min- 
utes and a slight sickness of the stomach. 

"I noticed my compass was affected im- 
mediately after the squall passed awa}'. 
When T lined up in the center of the channel 
and had got away from the attraction of the 
fog signal station I found my compass in- 
stead of reading W. 1-4 S., was reading W. 
7-8 S., having an easterly variation of 5-8 of 
1 point. 

"Leaving Manitowoc harbor, I found my 
compass, instead of reading E. 1-4 N., to 
read E. 1-2 S., therefore leaving the attrac- 
tion westerly to the amount of 3-4 of 1 
point." 



The steamer Muskegon, which was owned 
by J. J. Boland & Co., of Buffalo, has been 
sold to the Independent Sand & Gravel Com- 
pany of Chicago. Her new owners will con- 
vert her into a sandsucker. 



WHALEBACKS EXCHANGED. 



The old whaleback barges of the Pittsburg 
Steamship Company figured in the contract 
which the steamship company closed last 
week with the Great Lakes Engineering 
\'Vorks of Detroit. The Great Lakes En- 
gineering Works will take seven of the 
whaleback barges in part payment for the 
three 600-foot steamers that were ordered. 
It was not given out at what price the whale- 
backs were taken over. 

The barges that will be turned over to 
the shipbuilding company are the 117, 118, 
130, 131, 132, 133 and 134. The boats have 
not been in commission the past two seasons, 
and they will be towed to the plant of the 
shipbuilding company during the next few 
weeks. It is reported that the boats will be 
sent to the coast. If that is done, the barges 
will have to be changed, as they are too long 
to get through the Welland canal. 

The 117 and 118, which came out in 1891, 
are 285 feet keel and 36 feet beam, and have 
a capacity of about 3,000 tons. The 130, 131, 
132, 133 and 134 were built in 1893. They 
are 292 feet keel and 36 feet beam, and carry 
about 3,100 tons. 

Since he took charge of the fleet President 
and General Manager Coulby has disposed 
of all the whaleback barges except two. 
They are the Alexander Holley and the 137. 
Mr. Coulby sold sixteen of the whalebacks 
about four years ago, and they were taken 
to the coast. Changes have been made in 
most of the steamers that were built accord- 
ing to the plans of Captain Alex. McDougall. 



SHOAL AT ERIE. 



The steamers E. D. Carter, Wainwright, 
James Gayley and Admiral recently ground- 
ed on a shoal at the entrance to Erie harbor. 
George A. Marr, secretary of the Lake Car- 
riers' Association, took the matter up with 
Colonel W. L. Fisk, United States engineer 
at Buffalo. Regarding the shoal Colonel 
Fisk in reply said : 

"There is a shoal along the north line of 
the outer channel of Erie harbor 200 feet 
long, beginning" 400 feet Lakeward from 
the end of the north pier and 150 feet wide, 
on which the depth is less than twenty feet 
and least depth sixteen and a half feet at 
mean Lake level. 

"Vessels should pass the shoal in the small 
half of the 300-foot channel, where the depth 
is not less than nineteen and a half feet at 
mean Lake level 150 to 200 feet south of 
the range of the lighthouse on the outer 
and inner ends of the pier, which range is 
the north line of the dredged channel. 

"A contract is in force for removing this 
shoal and restoring all of the Erie entrance 
channel to the required depth of twenty feet 
at mean Lake level, and it is expected that 
the dredging will be begun before October 
1 and completed before the end of the 
month." 



Information from a reliable source states 
that a contract for a bulk freighter 524 feet 
lung and fifty-six feet beam was placed re- 
cently in Buffalo by Boland & Cornelius, 
managers of the American Steamship Com- 
pany, with President Pessano of the Great 
Lakes Engineering Works of Detroit. The 
steamer will be built on the arch type of con-> 
struction with automatic steel hatch covers, 
and will come out at the opening of 1910. 



NORTH STAR CLAIMS. 



Notice is given that those members of the 
crew of the North Star who put in a claim 
for clothing lost in the wreck of that vessel 
will be awarded compensation upon applica- 
tion to the Mutual Transportation Company, 
Ganson St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frank Donnelly is inquired for by his 
mother, Mrs. Eva Donnelly, 1317 Clark St., 
Racine, Wis. 



\Vm. A. Nicholson, No. 13,156, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his sister. Miss 
Alice Nicholson, 356 Lake street. Oak Park, 

111. 



L. F. Sweeney, No. 3132, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is anxiously inquired for by his 
family. Address K. Murphy, 541 North 
Clark street, Chicago, Ills. 



Fred Smith, No. 9872, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is wanted by his mother, at Buffalo, 
N. Y. Any one knowing his address please 
communicate with W. L. Smith, 55 Main 
St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



.\lbcrt Appenyella, sometimes known as 
Albert Zcllers, supposed to be a Seaman and 
a Drcdgeman, is inquired for by his sister, 
.Anna Goodmiller, 806 E. Wood St., Deca- 
tur. III. 



There is an obstruction in the channel at 
.\shtabula. The steamer Alexis W. Thomp- 
son struck it going in recently. The boat 
was damaged, but she is not leaking. 



The steamer P. P. Miller, which was 
aground at Huron, was released recently aft- 
er lightering about 400 tons of ore. The boat 
was not damaged. 



LAKE SEAMEN* S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telepiione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND. 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Phone Bell 1890. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 21."! Ranks Avenue 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

HAY Cl'\-Y. Mich 108 Kifth .Avonuc 

()(;i)i<:NSBnRG, N. Y "O Isaliella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ERIE, Pa 305 French Street 

Telephone Bell 682. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 

HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELffiP STATIONS. 

Ashland. Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Kscanalin. Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Mane, Mich. 

Gre«n Bay, Mich. Sheboygan, Midi. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay. Wis. 

Ludington. Mich. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A STERN CHASE. 
(Continued from Page 2.) 



liearts wc felt pretty mucli tlic .same as he- 
did on the subject. Only those who have 
sailed before the mast on .Xmerican decpwatcr 
"hellships," and have been treated worse than 
Bill Sikes ever treated his dog. can under- 
stand how a naturally inoffensive, peace-lovinj^ 
seaman is made over into a desperado with a 
heart bent on murder. 

By three o'clock wc were abreast of hire 
Island. The wind had veered around to 
northwest, and had attained a velocity of 
forty miles an hour or more. She was stag- 
gering along to the eastward under every bit 
of canvas we could give her. from skysails 
down to courses, and reeling ofif sixteen knots 
an hour. Indeed, she more than made good 
her re]nitation for being a fast sailer, as well 
as a record-breaker. 

And yet we were slowly but surely being 
overhauled by a craft coming up astern of 
us, which had been following us all the way 
from Sandy Hook. The experienced eye of 
"Brocky" had made her out to be a sloop of 
war, and from the speed she showed he opined 
that .she was the Lancaster. She was gaining 
on us, as nearly as we could judge, about iialf 
a mile an hour. As with us, she had every- 
thing set, and from the smoke which occa- 
sionally belched forth out of her funnel it 
was apparent that she wasn't saving her coal. 
To leeward, streaming in the wind in line with 
the Ice leach of the foretopsail, she displayed 
a set of signals which "Red " Murphy and tlie 
skipper were evidently trying to decipher, for 
they hafl the code book on deck and were both 
poring over it. 

By this time a rumor had gained footing 
forward that the sloop of war was after 
"Red" Murphy. What lent the color of prob- 
ability to the rumor was that the mate had 
been unusually cjuiet, almost subdued, in his 
manner the whole afternoon. Then there 
were the signals whicii, of course, were meant 
for us. .Mtogether, we began cherishing ho])e 
of soon getting rid of "Mr." Murphy, for the 
sloop of war was now within two miles of us, 
and would therefore be up with us in four 
hours more at the most. As the moon would 
be up all night there wasn't much show for 
us to give him the slip, which the afterguard 
would undoubtedly have tried to had the night 
been dark. 

Even as we were rubbing our hands in glee 
at the prospect of a ha])])y deliverance from 
"Red" Murphy, that gentleman sang out from 
the poop : 

"Boatswain, git the stu'nsails out from the 
locker. Bear a hand now. Some of you git 
the booms up an' reeve off the gear. Car])en- 
ter. you git the boom irons screwed in their 
places. Work lively there, bullies ; there'll be 
no watch below for anyone before them stu'n- 
sails are set." 

The tone in which he gave his orders was 
temperate in the extreme for a man of his 
savage disposition, and suggested to us that 
he kept his habitual ill temper under a wra]). 
And, strange to relate, the only one wiio 
seemed to take hinj seriously on the hurrv up 
proposition was "Tommy, the dude," the green 
hand with the drawing-room complexion, wiio 
worked like a beaver to get the studding sails 
on her and got in everybody's way. 

It was no easy matter to set studding sails 
in the strong gale that was blowing, but it was 
done at last. Of course, it couldn't have been 
done had not the wind been so steady that its 
pressure and probable .straining of gear and 



booms could be gauged to a pound almost. 
.\nd when it was done "Red" Murphy turnetl 
his villainous face to windward and i^rayed 
the prayer of the Dago cajitain cracking on 
sails in the "rolling forties," "IMow San An- 
tonio, but no rompe the mast." 

At sunset it was apparent that the sloop of 
war was not gaining on us any more ; the stud- 
ding sails had added an extra half knot to 
our speed, thus enabling us to maintain our 
distance from her. On seeing this "IJrocky, ' 
fearful that "Red" ^lurphy might yet escape, 
proposed to me and .'^teve that we let go the 
two anchors and thus stop her way. This 
could easily have been done as the anchors 
were as yet on tiie rail, secured only by some 
temporary rope lashings. Ijut we pointed out 
that with the big .sea running the flukes of 
the anchors would undoubtedly knock holes in 
her and send us to Davy Jones' locker in short 
order. Even if the |)lan was successful the 
chances were that "Red" Murphy, seeing his 
escape cut off, and acting on the maxim that 
it is just as well to be hung for a sheep as 
for a laml), would shoot us on the spot. lie- 
sides, we argued, the sloop of war had .steam 
to propel her in addition to wind, and the 
l^resent breeze would blow itself out sooner 
or later. The only danger was that the breeze, 
with the persistency of westerly winds in the 
North .Atlantic, might last several days, thus 
affording us an opportunity to slip away by 
altering our course sometime between the set- 
ting of the sun and tiie rising of the moon, 
which latter would, of course, take i)lace later 
and later with every passing night. 

With the rising of the full moon the gale, it 
seemed to us, freshened its nip. The .stud- 
ding sail booms were buckling like an Indian's 
bow, and there was that incessant cracking 
and snap])ing Iieard when spars and running 
gear are strained to all but the breaking point. 
All of US had that uneasy feeling begotten by 
not knowing just when or where to stand 
from under falling tophamper which at any 
moment might come tuiiil)ling down on us. 

But tlie devil was always good to his own. 
All night she kejjt jogging along without as 
much as breaking a ropeyarn. Every half 
hour we hove the log, and at no time did 
she make less than sixteen and a half knots, 
and often she made seventeen. The sloop of 
war hung in our wake with the dogged jier- 
tinacity of a hound running after a fox. Twice 
we passed sh\\)s going the same way as our- 
selves as though they had been at anchor. 
Had it not been for the sloop of war pursuing 
us they must surely have thought us the I'ly- 
ing Dutchman, for to the ordinary mariner it 
would hardly seem natural that a ship built 
by human hands could carry such a cloud of 
canvas as we did in the breeze then blowing. 

At daybreak the softened apjiearance of the 
sky in general, and the warm-hued tints of the 
dawn, indicated the i)robability of a gradually 
lessening breeze. The wind, in fact, had al- 
ready moderated some, for when we looked 
astern we saw that the sloop of war was not 
much more than a mile ])ehind us. Foot by 
foot she kept crawling up on us till by nine 
o'clock she was abeam to leeward, less than 
half a mile off. She displayed no signals of 
any kind, nor did she hail us in any manner: 
but as the hours went by with the breeze 
steadily moderating, and she still kept her ])o- 
sition abeam of us, the conviction grew upon 
ns that she was after us without a doubt, 
and was only waiting for the sea to go down 
before sending a boat to board us. 

"Red" Murphy had evidently resigned him- 
self to his impending fate, for he had long 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATPORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
l)y the American Federation of Labor: 

1. Tlie abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free te.xt books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all F"cderal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page b.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC, 



Headquarters: 

S.VN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER. B. C, 122 Alexander St.. P. O. Box 
1365. 

TACOM.\. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Qulncy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 62. 

PORTLAND. Or.. 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal.. 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

S.\N PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULIT, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 91 Steuart St. 

Branch) 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 14nsi^ Western Ave., P. O. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cn]., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC, 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. . ,. „, 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FRANCISCO. C,il.. P3 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be proiuied by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

ITDERATES SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



since ceased to give orders, and was moodily 
seated on the mizzen booby hatch, his hands 
clasped around his left knee. His face was 
haggard and drawn, as much from want of 
sleep as anything else, for he had been on 
deck the whole night. Now and then he 
would take a long look at the sloop of war, 
and at such times there crept into his eyes 
the glint of despair that comes to the hunted 
criminal when brought to bay. Altogether he 
presented a living proof of the truth that a 
guilty conscience makes cowards of us all. 

At noon she was making only six knots, and 
the sea had gone down considerably. Eight 
bells were struck onboard of the sloop of war. 
Hardly had the last chime died away before 
she fired a shot across our bow and ran up 
a. signal to her mizzen gaff. The next mo- 
ment she sheered to within hailing distance of 
us. A gold-laced officer on her quarter deck 
]iut a speaking trumpet to his mouth and sang 
out : 

"Heave your ship too at once, sir. I am 
going to send a boat alongside of you." 

In five minutes more we had taken in the 
studding sails and backed the mainyards. For 
once no urging was needed to make us work 
lively. In the meantime the sloop of war had 
lowered a launcli into which an officer, a couple 
of marines and six bluejackets piled. C)n her 
bow was painted in small black letters, "U. S. 
S. Lancaster." Presently she came alongside, 
and the officer, followed by the two marines 
and two of the bluejackets, climbed onl)oard. 

"I know that lieutenant," whispered 
"Brockey." "He's all right ; he was with me 
in the Brooklyn." 

The lieutenant wasted no time on formali- 
ties but, turning to the skipper, asked, an- 
grily : 

"Why the devil didn't you answer our sig- 
nals yesterday?" 

"Because I didn't have to," replied the skip- 
per, surlily. 

"I have a good mind to take you back to 
New York," went on the lieutenant, "and make 
you stand trial for your conduct. Muster all 
of your crew aft and bring your articles on 
deck." 

After looking over the articles he scanned 
the crowd in front of him for a moment as if 
searching for some particular person. A sink- 
ing sensation began to assail our hearts. 
Could it be possible, after all, that he had not 
come for "Red" Murphy? Surely, we thought, 
if he was after the mate he would look for 
him among the afterguard, who were all stand- 
ing on the poop. 

"Where is Thomas Smith ?" he at length 
asked. "I have an order for his arrest." 

"Thomas Smitli?" echoed "Red" Murphy, 
alacriously, his face wreathed with smiles, now 
that the awful suspense he had sufifered was 
over. "Why, that's the young greeny in my 
watch. Where the hell is he?" he thundered, 
his voice having suddenly recovered all its 
wonted fierceness and resonance. 

In the excitement of heaving to and being 
boarded no one had missed "Tommy, the 
dude," but now that he was wanted he was 
nowhere in sight. With a bound "Red" Mur- 
phy jumped off the poop and made for the 
forecastle. Just as he disappeared around the 
forward comer of the forecastle we heard the 
report of a shot. With awed faces all hands 
rushed forward, driven by that curious im- 
pulse of human nature which makes us revel 
in the morbid and the creepy. There, on deck, 
near the forema.st, lay "Tommy, the dude," 
dead, his right hand grasping a smoking re- 



volver, a small stream of blood trickling from 
his temple where the bullet had entered. 

The lieutenant looked at the dead man at- 
tentively. Turning to the bluejackets he said : 

"That's the man we are after. Pick him 
up and carry him aft, and we'll lower him 
into the launch." 

We looked at one another in dismay. Was 
"Red" Murphy to escape the clutches of the 
law after all? As if in answer to our ques- 
tion "Brocky" nudged us all around, saying: 

"I'll fix Murphy all right. Just watch me." 

Pushing his way through us he stepped up 
in front of the lieutenant and saluted him in 
naval fashion : 

"May I speak to you for a moment, Mr. 
Eagan ?" he asked. 

"Why, bless my soul, is tliat you Wilcox?" 
exclaimed the heutenant, cordially extending 
his hand to "Brocky." "I hadn't noticed you 
before. Certainly you may speak. What is 
it?" 

"Well," began "Brocky," "the reason they 
wouldn't answer your signals yesterday was 
because the chief mate there," pointing to 
"Red" Murphy, "is wanted by the authorities 
in New York for murder and mayhem, an' 
they naturally thought, as we all did, that you 
was after him." 

Then "Brocky" went on to tell how "Red" 
Murphy had kept in hiding while the vessel 
was being loaded, and how he had been smug- 
gled onboard off Sandy Hook. 

"Here you can see for yourself, sir," he 
wound up. "what he's done," handing Lieuten- 
ant Egan a newspaper clipping containing an 
account of the death of the seaman whom 
"Red" Murphy had illtreated on the previous 
voyage, as well as other items bearing on the 
charges of mayhem against the mate. 

Lieutenant Eagan read the clipping, now 
and then looking over to where "Red" Mur- 
phy stood, the picture of baffled rage and sul- 
len despair. When he had finished reading 
he beckoned to the two marines and, indicat- 
ing "Red" Murphy with a contemptuous wave 
of his hand, said : 

"Arrest that man. Go aft with him and get 
his belongings and get him in the launch as 
soon as possible." 

A quarter of an hour later we enjoyed the 
pleasing spectacle of seeing "Red" Murphy 
seated in the launch between the two marines 
on his way to the sloop of war. Even before 
the launch had been hoisted in the davits we 
had braced our mainyards around again, and 
were once more standing on our course. It 
was sixteen months ere we got back to New 
York, "Brocky" serving as third mate during 
the remainder of the voyage. As soon as I 
got ashore I went up to the Herald's office 
and looked over the back numbers on file. 
There I found that "Red" Murphy had been 
convicted of murder in the second degree, and 
had been sentenced to fifteen years in Sing 
Sing. 

But, strangely enough, I could find no men- 
tion of the suicide of "Tommy, the dude," or 
of the reasons why a warship had been des- 
patched after him, or of anything whatever 
concerning him. It was only years afterwards, 
at a dinner where I met an old newspaper 
man, and to whom I had related my experience 
onboard of the Hidalgo, that I found out the 
particulars of the case. His narrative was, 
briefly, as follows: 

"Thomas Smith" was a graduate of Har- 
vard and the son of one of the most promi- 
nent U. S. Senators. Thanks to the influence 
of his father young "Smith," after leaving 
Harvard, was appointed to a responsible posi- 



tion in a Wall Street bank, said institution 
also being a United States depositary. Be- 
cause of his family connections he had the 
entree to most of the functions of "society," 
and soon made himself a general favorite 
among the "smart set." After a while he fell 
into the meshes of one of those fascinating 
sirens who are found in every metropolis in 
the world, and who prey upon the weaknesses 
of young men of good family and fortune. 
One day the Government had occasion to with- 
draw some of the funds deposited in the bank 
where young "Smith" was employed. Exam- 
ination of the books revealed a shortage of 
over half a million dollars. A hurried search 
was made for young "Smith," but he could 
nowhere be found. Detectives eventually 
trailed him to a sailors' boarding-house in 
Water street, but only to find that their quarry 
had gone to sea on the ship Hidalgo. The 
Government ■ thereupon directed the com- 
mander of the Brooklyn Navy Yard to imme- 
diately despatch a warship in pursuit of the 
Hidalgo, with what result the reader is already 
acquainted. Owing to the power wielded by 
young "Smith's" father in Washington the 
whole affair was hushed up, none of the de- 
tails ever getting into the newspapers, the 
despatch of the Lancaster being explained by 
the rcttn-n of "Red" Murphy to stand trial for 
murder. El Tuerto. 



FISHERIES OF CANADA. 



The eastern seacoast of the maritime prov- 
inces, from the Bay of Fundy to the Straits 
of Belle Isle covers a distance of 5,600 miles. 
The salt-water inshore area covers over 1,500 
square miles. The total fisheries expendi- 
ture for the year amounted to $956,196, sub- 
divided as follows: Fisheries proper, $157,- 
874; fish breeding, $235,660; fisheries-protec- 
tion service, $225,280; miscellaneous expen- 
diture, $171,267, and $156,114 distributed as 
fishing bounties. The total revenue from 
fishing licenses, fines, etc., during the same 
period in the different provinces was $90,- 
686, including $10,000 received from the 
United States fishing fleet, as modus vivendi 
fees. The deep-sea fishermen of the mari- 
time provinces received $156,114 as bounties 
on their catches for the season of 1907. 

The whole value of the catch in local wa- 
ters by Canadians, including fish products, 
seals, etc., during the season of 1907, includ- 
ing winter fishing of 1908 to March 31, was 
valued at $25,500,000, a falling off of three- 
quarters of a million as compared with 1906. 
The value of the Nova Scotia fisheries was 
$7,632,330, a decrease of $166,830. The quan- 
tity of fish used as bait in the season was 
valued at $518,022, and that of fish oil at 
$539,067. The value of the lobster fishery 
during the season was $4,084,122, an increase 
of $661,195 over 1906. Cod, halibut, smelts, 
clams, etc., also showed an increased value. 
The decrease in herring amounted to over 
$600,000. 

During the season over 71,000 men were 
engaged in the Canadian fisheries and used 
equipment representing an aggregate capital 
of nearly $15,000,000. The lobster plant 
alone is valued at over $1,500,000, compris- 
ing the equipment of nearly 700 canneries, 
217 of which are in Nova Scotia. The can- 
neries placed on the market nearly 9,000,000 
cans of the preserved crustacean, and about 
1,000,000 ])ounds were disposed of alive or in 
a fresh state, both aggregating a value ex- 
ceeding $4,000,000. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Tlie British Hon. ^f I-ords on Sep- 
tember 29 passed the second reading 
of the Irish Land bill, but promised to 
introduce drastic amendments when it 
reached committee. 

The French dirigible military bal- 
loon Republique exploded in the air 
near Moulins, France, on September 
25 and was wrecked. The four men 
on board were killed. 

Cholera has become epidemic in Co- 
rea, over 500 cases having been re- 
ported since the disease made its ap- 
pearance in Seoul. Thus far no for- 
eigners have been attacked by the 
cholera. 

The Lord Mayor of London has an- 
nounced his intention of opening a 
Mansion House fund to assist Captain 
Robert F. Scott to raise money for his 
expedition to plant the Union Jack at 
the South Pole. 

Madrid was beflagged and illumi- 
nated on September 29 in celebration 
of the success of the Spanish arms in 
Africa, crowned by the occupation of 
Mount Guruga, the Moorish strong- 
hold. It is believed that the war in 
Africa is ended. 

Rodin's statue of Victor Hugo was 
unveiled in the garden of the Palais 
Royal at Paris on September 30 with 
elaborate ceremonies, and the week's 
celebrations to commemorate the fif- 
tieth anniversary of the appearance of 
the "Story of the Centuries" were 
thus inaugurated. 

Another dissolution of the Finnish 
Senate is imminent as a result of the 
conflict with Russia over the amount 
of Finland's contribution to the de- 
fense of the Empire. The Finns pro- 
pose to contribute $2,000,000 annual- 
ly, but the Russian Cabinet insists 
upon a contribution of $4,000,000. 

."Mbert Sanchez, an electrical en- 
gineer at present an inmate of Belem 
Prison, Mexico City, Mex., says he 
has invented an apparatus whereby 
vision as well as voice may be trans- 
mitted over an ordinary telephone 
wire. He calls his invention a tele- 
radioption. 

Protocols have been signed by Peru 
and Bolivia, one accepting the arbi- 
tral award of Argentina vi'ith regard 
to the boundary, and the other mak- 
ing a special arrangement with refer- 
ence to the frontier lines. The dispute 
between the two countries has been 
satisfactorily settled. 

The authorities of Barcelona are 
making use of the most drastic meas- 
ures to rid the city of suspected revo- 
lutionists. Hundreds of Republican 
and anarchist suspects are being ex- 
iled to the provinces without a hear- 
ing, and often without being given 
an opportunity to notify their families. 
The British steamer Harlow, Cap- 
tain Bruce, at Manila, P. I., on Sep- 
tember 20 from Newport News, re- 
ports that on July 27, while 180 miles 
from Durban, she passed a steamer 
afire. It is supposed this steamer was 
the missing British steamer Waratah, 
which, with 300 persons on board, has 
not been heard from since July 26. 

An official statement will be pub- 
lished exonerating the Commercial 
High School of Charlottenburg, Ger- 
many, in which two pupils recently 
committed suicide by agreement. Pub- 
lic anxiety over the subject of suicide 
is growing and the papers are giving 
it much attention. Investigation proves 
that every week a schoolboy kills him- 
self in Germany and that this aver- 
age has been maintained for the last 
twenty-six years. 



Taylor's Nautical School 

Established 1888. 




Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cat. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School in 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
American and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant officers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal Instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M. A.. Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all mattor.s, including Naturalization. 



ROOS BROS. 

Biggest Values in Men's Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Hats 

50 YEARS in" BUSINESS 

ROOS^ROS. 



MARKET STREET 



San Francisco 



HE LIVES UP TO TITS NAME 

WHO 

Why Boss the Boss Tailor 




HE EMPLOYS ONLY FIRST- 
CLASS UNION HELP 
NUF CED. 

Boss the Tailor 

1120 MARKET ST. 



Opposite Seventh 



San Francisco 



MARSHFIELD, OR 

UNION CIGAR STORE 

383 FRONT ST. 

MARSHFIELD, OREGON 

Dealers in 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO, CANDY, 

NUTS, ETC. 
Longshoremen and Sailors' Headquarters 
HERMAN CORDES. Prop. 
Phone 97-L 



EUREKA, CAL. 




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Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
any^-here ALONG THE COAST. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," th« "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made clgan. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, Eureka, Gal. 



Many apprentice seamen, when 
RoinR aloft for the first time, are afraid 
that the loi) is crowded, but always 
when they get up thrDuRli the ' ' lubber's 
hole" they find plenty of room; like- 
wise, many apprentice seamen and 
enlisted men fear there is no room at 
the top for them in the navy, that the 
hiRher positions are so filled up that 
they cannot hope to gain one. This 
is wrong. There are plenty of high 
positions waiting for ambitious men 
in the navy, if they will but properly 
qualify themselves. Every new ship 
that goes into commission increases 
these opportunities. If yoti wish tf> 
climb to a higher berth, an institu- 
tion that has helpetl hundreds <if 
men to better themselves will help 
you to secure a higher rating in the 
simplest, surest, and quickest way in 
the world. You need not leave your 
ship, nor use but a small part of your 
spare time off duty. It costs you 
nothing to investigate; simply mark 
and mail the coupon Iwlow. Will you 
answer Opportunity's knock, or does 
she have to break in your door with 
an a.xe? Send in the coupon HOW. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers In Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



International Correspondence Schools 

Box 898, Scranton, Pa. 

Please explain how 1 can quality lor itcHer wages 

and promotion to the position before which 

) have marked X. 



Master 


Civil Service Exems. 


FIrtt Officer 


Commercial L«w for 


Second Officer 


Clerks and Stcnogr's 


Petty Officer 


Bookkeeper 


Chief Engineer 


Stenographer 


1st Aett. Engineer 


Electrical Engineer 


2d Aeet. Engineer 


Mechanical Engineer 


Lak« Copleln 


Civ.l Engineer 


Zd-Cleea Pilot 


Architect 


Marine Engineer 


French ^ With 


Mechanical Draftaman 


German ^ Edison 
Spanish ) Phonograph 


Engliah Branohea 



City 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 
Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAIIAMSEN, Prop. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a. rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle oan 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 

period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 

Allen. W. J. Lauritsen, Hans 

Anderson, Alf. Larsen, Kristian 

Anderson, Andrew Laive, V. 

Anderson. Carl P. Linder, Victor 

Ankerstrom, C. Lind. Hjilmar E. 

Anker, C Lorin. Kristian 

Berentsen, R. Mathison, Nils 

Benson, B. Martinson, Christ. 

Bianca, F. Machado. E. 

Bird. Chr. Malmberg, A. C. 

Bray, A. E. Magnusen, E. W. 

Brauer, Geo. Martinsohn, A. 

Brown, Jim McMahon. J. 

Burkland. John Mehuot, Jas. 

Carlson, Ole Mikkelsen, Kristian 

Carlson, Ludwik Miller. Adolf 

Carlson, Thure Molver, Olaf 

Carnell, Geo. B. More. A. O. 
Christofterson, Emil Morrison, J. 

Christensen. VIggo Monoghan, J. 

Chapman, F. G. Moore, James 

Conee, A. Nagel, A. 

Coughlan, Chas. Nelsen. M. 

Daly, John Ness, Carl 

Daniels, C. Nielsen, Wllhelm 

Dreffelt, Albert Nielsen, B. P. 

Doll, Herman Nielsen. Waldemar 

Egelkoff. Fred Olsen. Anton 

Elliot, W. V. Olsson. Just 

Eliasen, E. Olsen, O. A. -872 

Engberg, Oscar Olason, A. 

Ernst, Georgo Olsson, Johan 

Erick, Mr. Olsen, Andrew 

Erikson. Alton Olson, Charles 

Erickson. Axel R. Orten, Sigurd 

Espy, Orville Owens. J. H. 

Flynn. Maurice Peters. J. 

Fjelstad, K. M. Pettersen. Sigurd 

Franzell, Arthur Pernin. Clir. 

Fredriksen, B. D. Pertells. W 

Gekler, Fritz Penny, W. 

Gonyette, Joseph Petersen, P. 

Gustafson. Karl O. Price, Bruce 
Hansen. H. C. -1998 Rasmussen, A. N. 

Haga, A. Andersen Rasmussen, R. -525 

Hanson. T. S. Roinman. Karl 

Haug, H. H. Rider, Arthur 

Hansen, H. Johan Rider, David 

Hansen, H. K. Rugland, Ole 

Harris, Jos. B. Sandstrom. Th. 

Hedlund, Arvid . Sanchez, F. 

Hellwood. Mr. Sandstrom, O. H. 

Hewitt. P. Saalenes, T. J. 

Jensen, Johannes Samuelson, Harold 

-16S4 Schmak, M. 

Jensen. Louis Scherlen, Robert 

Jersch, W. Schultz. Ernest 

Jorgensen, J. A. Sckubber, H. 

Jocketyn, J. Skoog, August 
Johnson, C. F. -1506 Soderlund, J. F. 

Johnson, Eric Solly, Ed. 

.Johnson, P. K. J. Sorensen, Hans 

Johnson, Chas. Stoft, K. 

Johnson, C. J. Syvertsen, Ole 

Johnsen, Hans Swanson, J. 

Johansen, Knut Sunby, A. E. 

Johansen, Alf. Tellefsen, Pedei* 

Johanson, Victor Thompson, T. 

.Johnson. Emil Thorn, Arvid 

Klintberg, Chas. Torgersen, Ludvig 

Kleine, Carl Tockelyn, T. 

Klausen. Karl A'lctorsen. Ernest M. 

Klingenberg, John Warren. Louis 

Kristiiinsen, Louis Wallace, A. 

Kristoftersen, Emil Walter, E. R. A. 

Kristiansen. Nils Wennecke, A. 

Lathonen, Frank Wifstrand. C. T. 

Larson. H. C. M. Worm, Albert 
Latz. Konstant 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The five sailors who left the schoon- 
er A. J. West at Honolulu, on March 
30, 1908, are requested to communicate 
with the Secretary of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific. The libel against 
the A. J. West has been adversely de- 
cided by the Federal Court at Hono- 
lulu. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnilde 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
OfHce: 
23 UNION AVENUE • - Portland, Ore. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BR05. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins 
Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos 
Cutlery and Notions. ' 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 891. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &L CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Siioes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 




"THE WHITE HOUSE" 

ALEXANDER & McBRIDE 

403 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Ow^ner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

'port TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All order."* by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 

around the corner from the Union OfBce. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer* In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

11 Coleman Dock, SEATTLE, Wash. 

Office Phone, Ind. 171S. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 




HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed in the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all its 
Branches, and In the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

494 ARCADE BUILDING 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 
Dry Qoods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hatt and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ing* and Sailors' Outfit*. 
Sit Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



First-Class Workmanship, Perfect Fit 

Phone Sunset Main 3771 

A place to go wlien others f.ii! to satisfy. 

STRICTLY UNION HOUSE. 

NILS HOKANSON 
High Class Tailor 

106 SPRING STREET, bet. 1st and 2nd 
Seattle, Wash. 



Governor John A. Johnson of Min- 
nesota died at Rochester, Minn., on 
September 21 after a short illness. 

The Supreme Court of Nebraska has 
upheld the Sibley Act, which makes a 
cut of 25 per cent in express rates in 
that State. 

Wilbur Wright circled the great 
statue of Liberty at the entrance of 
New York harbor in his aeroplane on 
September 29. 

Several hundred lives were lost in 
a tropical storm which swept over the 
Gulf shore of Louisiana and Missis- 
sippi on September 20. 

Naturalization was refused to 2067 
aliens during the last fiscal year, a 
material increase over the rejection of 
would-be United States citizens dur- 
ing the preceding year. 

Dr. Frederick A. Cook, the discover- 
er of the North Pole, arrived at New 
York on September 21 and was warm- 
ly received by the members of the 
Arctic Club, the press and public. 

A sharp earthquake was felt through 
southeastern Missouri and in southern 
and central Illinois and Indiana on 
September 27. So far as has been 
learned, little or no damage resulted. 
The National Geographic Society 
has decided not to grant oiScial recog- 
nition to either Peary or Cook until 
tlieir records have been passed upon 
by a competent scientific commission 
in the United States. 

It is reported that the United States 
Government will shortly file an official 
protest against the recently concluded 
convention between Japan and China, 
wherein the former secured a mining 
monopoly in Manchuria. 

Commander Peary, discoverer of the 
North Pole, arrived in the United 
States on September 22. He an- 
nounces that he will accept no honors 
until his claim as the only discoverer ' 
of the North Pole has been determined 
by competent authority. 

When President Taft visits El Pa- 
so he will be presented with the finest 
Mexican sombrero ever exported from 
Mexico. The hat will be highly deco- 
rated in gold and silver. It is now 
being manufactured in Mexico City 
and will cost several hundred dollars. 
Objection has been raised to the 
naturalization of Turks at Cincinnati, 
O. The Federal authorities hold that 
Turks are descendants of Asiatic Mon- 
gols and that they are beyond the pale 
of the law that permits the naturaliza- 
tion only of white persons and de- 
scendants of African blacks. 

Four million cigars formed a large 
part of the cargo of the Pacific Mail 
liner Siberia, which sailed from Ma- 
nila, P. r., on September 23 for San 
Francisco. As a result of the heavy 
demand for Philippine cigars since the 
tariff was removed, factories are be- 
ginning to advance prices. 

At Vina, just across the line in Te- 
liama county, where the famous Stan- 
ford vineyard, Cal., now owned by 
Stanford University, is located, there 
arc claimed to be at this time more 
Japanese than white people, while only 
a few years ago there were no Japa- 
nese found there. 

A new world's typewriting record 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Alfred Douglas Brakel, a native of'J ^^'"^^ ^^' ""^ Madison Square Garden, 
Russia, also known as Fred Hansen, 



left the Russian cruiser Lena; last 
heard of about three years ago, is in- 
(luired for by his mother. Address, 
"Coast Seamen's Journal." 



New York, on September 28, when 
Miss Rose L. Fritz wrote accurately 
ninety-five words a minute for fifteen 
minutes in the preliminary event of 
the international championship con- 
ducted by the Business Show. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Commander Pcarj-'s Arctic explora- 
tion steamer Roosevelt arrived at New 
York on September 30 from her trip 
to the Far North. 

William H. Palmer, head of the firm 
controlling the largest fleet of coast- 
ing schooners in the world, died at 
Boston on September 29, aged 50 
years. 

The 100th aniversary of the birth of 
Admiral Raphael Semmes, naval hero 
of the Confederate States, was marked 
by public ceremonies in the South on 
September 27. 

The Philadelphia and Gulf Line an- 
nounced recently that it has purchased 
the steamship Evelyn from J. H. Bull 
& Co., of New York, to operate in the 
service between Philadelphia and New 
Orleans. 

The American schooner Henry 
Crosby arrived at Mobile on Septem- 
ber 12 dismantled and without i)ro- 
visions or water. She was wrecked 
in the hurricane of August 24 off 
Grand Cayman Island. 

The seagoing tug S. .A. McCauley, 
which is known in every port along the 
Atlantic Coast, has been sold by James 
McCauley to E. Meyle and L. B. 
Tucker and will hereafter be used for 
harbor and lighterage towing. 

There is much interest in the finan- 
cial district of Boston, due to a report 
that the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad Company is to be- 
come owner of an interest, said to 
be 50 per cent, in the Metropolitan 
Steamship Company. 

Lloyd's agent at St. John's. X. P., 
has received a dispatch from Indian 
Harbor, Labrador, reporting that the 
whaling ship Snowdrop, of Dundee, 
was wrecked on September 18, 1908. 
in Frobisher Strait. The crew were 
saved. 

The steamship Naomi, rebuilt at a 
cost of $200,000, will be placed in serv- 
ice by the Crosby Transportation 
Company, between Milwaukee, Grand 
Haven and Muskegon. The hull of 
the vessel_ is steel, and she has a pas- 
senger-carrying capacity of 2000. 

Two members of the crew of the 
schooner Isaac T. Campbell were 
drowned when that vessel was 
wrecked on the voyage from Phila- 
delphia to Paramaribo. The two men 
were John Robertson and Herbert 
Bense. The other members of the 
crew were rescued by the British 
steamship Lugano and landed at Gal- 
veston. 

International acjuatic honors were 
captured by Germany and the United 
States on September 29 in the pulling 
races for the crews of the warships at 
anchor in the Hudson. The Germans 
outrowed the Italians, British, French 
and Netherlanders in the races for the 
visiting ships, while a crew from the 
Minnesota showed the way to the Ger- 
man, Italian and British seamen in the 
big international race. 

For heroic rescues in various parts 
of the country, gold and silver life- 
saving medals have been awarded by 
the Treasury Department to Frederick 
W. McNeeley, a Navy yeoman; Hugh 
F. Doherty, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Robert 
Mellon and Fitz Wiltshire, Panama 
Canal Zone employes; Michael Mallai, 
chief boatswain's mate in the Navy; 
M. M. Ursina, second lieutenant of 
engineers in the revenue-cutter serv- 
ice, and Captain E. J. Dodge, Wilbur 
L. Dodge and Peter Peterson, the four 
last named for rescues at Mackinac, 
Mich. 



San Francisco Lmttmr List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for tiiree 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abbors, Arne 
Aga, Johan 
Ahern, Dan 
Akerman, W. 
Akerson, Chas. A. 
Andersen, Chr. 
Andersen, -1562 
Andersen, Sam 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Ned 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, W. -1274 
Andersson, Emil 
Andersson, -124B 

Band. W. 
Balcman, Karl 
Bartels. Herman 
Barrinto, J. 
Bastion. -1282 
Beck, Mr. 
Beckman. Rudolph 
Belin. Erik 
Bensen. B. 
Benson-1454 
Benson. Jno. A. 
Berg. Julius 
Berntsson, M. 
Birde, Chr. 
Birkelund, R. 
Bjorklund, Erick 
Boisen, Jorgen 

Callaway, Edw. 
Campbell. Neil 
Carlgren-644 
Carlsen, Sigurd 
Carlson-760 
Carlson, Chas. 
Carlson, Ernest 
Carlson, Oscar 
Cailnliom. A. 
Carlsson. John W. 
Carlsson, E. G. 
Carnaghan, Mr. 
Carrick, Jas. B. 
Causen, Jorgen 
Ceelan, John 

Dahl, John B. 
Uahlbeck, John C. 
Dahl, Ole 
Day. Harry 
Diez, Th. H. 
Dixon, John 
Doose, Wm. 
Dorum, B. M. 

Edman-557 
Egelhoff, Fred 
Eklund. Harry 
Ekwall. G. A. 
Elfstronn, Axel 
Eliasen. C. 
Ellingsen, Fred 
Endresen-673 
Engberg, Oskar Leo 

Feeiey, Thomas 
Fenstad, Torger 
Fogland. .\rthur 
Folwlck, Carl 

Gabrielsen, Knud 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Geiger, Joe 
Gibbs, Harry D. 
Gordfald, Fred 
Gronman, H. K. 
Culberson, A. 
Haagensen, M. 
Hallenberg. S. G. 
Halloran, Chas. A. 
Halvorsen, H. E. 
Hallstrom, J. E. 
Halvorsen. Wm. 
Harnmargren, Oscar 
Hansen-1869 
Hansen, Emil 
Hansen, Christian 
Hanson, Jolm 
Hansen, -1195 
Hansen, Harold O. 
Hansen-1576 
Hansen, Geo. 
Hansen, H. T. 
Hansen, Jens M. 
Hansen, Theo. 
Hansen. Markus H. 
Hanssen, -1867 
Ingeman, -132 
Ingvalsen. Ingro. 
Ingwardsen, R. 
Jaconbsen, P.-1786 
Jacobson, Gust. 
Jensen, Hani 
Jensen, Cnaa. 
Jensen. -1076 
Jenson, T. C. 
Jespersen, Martin 
Johnsen, -1281 
Johnson, Geo. 
Johnson, Hilmer 
Johnson, Richard 
Johnson, John B. 
Johnson-1800 

Kaho, H. 
Kaliiian. L. 
Kamp, Gus H. 
Kane, G. 

Kannisto, K. J. O. 
Karlson, Aug. 
Karlsen, Konrad 
Karlsen-270 
Karlson, Richard 
Karlgren-644 
Kavall, John 
Keelan, J. 
Kellgren. J. A. 
Kenniston, Frank 
Kerr, Wm. 
Laason, -1790 
Laason. M. 
Lahr, Otto 
Laine. Nicholas 
Lane, Leonard 
Lane. Leeland 
Langvardt, Chr. 
Langben, Chas. 
Langdon, Chas. 



Andersen-1305 
Andersen-1526 
Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson-1274 
Andersson, Karl T. 
Andersson- 1552 
Andersson, Fritz 
Antonsen, Marius 
Apps, P. 
Aunbaun, A. 
Axelsen, Axal 
Aylward, Jas. 

Borresen, Niels 
lioyeason, John 
Brams. Carl S. 
Brander, W. 
Brauer, Friedrich 
Bray. John K. 
Bray. Edward 
Bremer, B. 
Brewer, Wm. 
Brinton, Geo. 
Brox, Harry 
Bruhn, Paul 
Bryde, Carl M. 
Bung, B. 
Bushman. J. 
Bustamante, Jos* 

Chapman, Frank 
Cliauchc. Jean 
Chrlstensen, Albert 
Christensen-878 
Christensen-905 
Christensen-1325 
Christensen-1332 
Christensen. -1126 
Christiansen, J. F. 
Christensen. E. H. 
Christoftersen-1288 
Chisholm, R. 
Claus. C. 
Cronin, O. H. 

Dories, H. 
Draear. Kdgardo 

Drausmann, Chas. 
Dully, Alex 
Duncan, G. M. 
Durholt, Hugo 
Dyrnes, L. E. 

Engblom, Albert 
Kidman, B. J. 
Eriksen, E. H. 
Eriksen, Karl J. 
lOrickson, A. 
Erickson, Fred 
Ericson, C. \V. 
Erikson, P. E. 
Evensen, John 

Forig. O. 
Frederiksen, B. 
Froberg, T. \V. 
Fuchs, J. 

Gunnarson, John 
Gunderson, Ole 
Gundersen-785 
Gundersen, Martin 
Gustafsson, G. B. 
Gyerdall, S. 

Hedlund, Orvid 
Heesche, H. 
Hegener. Reinhold 
Heinz, Jack 
Helkklla. P. 
Heller, O. 
Helsen. T. 
Hendriksen, Adolf 
Henriksen, Adolf G. 
Hetman, Walter 
Hoglund, Frank 
Holm, S. 
Holstein, R. 
Holz-1764 
Horchan. Y. 
Hosetli. A. 
Hull. H. 
Hull, W. 
Hultberg-1833 
Hultman, Albin 
Isaacsen, Isaac 
Isaksen, Kristen 

Johnson, Carl 
Johnson, Hugo 
Johnson, Fred 
Johnsson, Frank 
Johansen, C. H. 
Johanson, -880 
Johanessen, M. E. 
Johansen-1191 
Johansson-1856 
Joliansson, Oscar 
Johannessen, -1863 
Jonassen, Johan 
Jouanne, Walter 

Kerch, Geo. C. 
Klaesson, Axel 
Klotzke. Otto 
Knudsen. Lars. 
KofC, M. 
Kolter, L. 
Kopats, Oscar 
Krane. T. 
Krp?tensen, C. E. 
Kristlansen, Nils 
Krlstorrersen. -1288 
Kristiunsen. L. A. 
Kristoffersen, Andro 
Kuehme, W. 

Lehto, Alex. 
I-eibold, Fritz 
J.,eithoff, Carl 
Lindholm-610 
Llndblad, C. 
Linderos. Wm. 
Lindvist, Carl A. 
Lindroas, Oscar 
Lindgren, G. 



Larsen. Peter 
T-arsen-ir>36 
T.,arsen-1290 
I..arson, L. 
Lass, -1406 
Lauretsen, Ole 
Lohne, E. 
Madsen, -952 
Malniherg. Elis 
Mannik, John 
Marius, Bernhard 
Maripu, John 
Markmann, H. 
Markus, B. 
Martinsson, Josef 
Margnusson, E. W. 
Martin. Geo. 
Mathiesen, L. 
Matthews. H. J. 
Mattler, Franz 
Mattson-709 

Naber, M. 
Nauman, Alf. 
Nelsen. Andrew 
Nesbitt, J. 
Nester, Wilson C 
Nielsen, -950 
Nielsen. -918 
Nielsen. John N. 
Niemi, Fr. 
Nilsen, Anders 
Nilsen-985 
Nilsen, Olaus 

O'Daly, John 
Olafsson, Ed. 
Olsen, Olai 
Olsen, Gust. 
Olsen, Soren 
Olsen, M. 
Olsen, Marinus 
Olsen. -499 
Olsen-996 
Olsen-1047 
Olson, Carl 

Pallzek, Lorenz 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Pedersen, S. Rein- 
hold 
Pedersen, Olav 
Pedersen, Olaf A. 
Pedersen, -1086 
Pedersen, -1110 
Penny, Matthew 
Persson, Hjalmar 
Peterson, Henry 
Petersen, Clias. 
1 etersen, Henning 
I'elersen, -782 

Radberg, C. 
Uasmussen, Emil 
Hasniussen, -525 
Rasmuson, A. 
Keichelt, H. A. 
Kcic-hnian. J. 
Rintzo, John 
Koalsen, K. E. 
fHobinet, G. 

Sampson, Carl 
Samsmg, Carl 
Sand, B. -2113 
Sandberg, N. A. 
Sander, Chas. 
Saul, Th. A. 
Sclievig, A. B. 
Schlachte. Alf. 
Schluter, Paul 
Schmidt, Fritz 
Schmitt, Geo. 
Scholl, Karl 
Scholtens, Ben 
Schrodt, Alf. 
Schroder, F. A. 
Schutz, Ludvig 
Scott, Ed. 
Selander, Gus. 
Semberg, John 
Senger, G. 
Sexon, Chas. 
Shilling. H. 
Shmitt. -1793 
Hhwitzer, H. 
Sle, John 
Siebert, Harry 
Siem, C. 
Siegurd, J. I. 
Sievers, Herman 

Teigland, Karl 
Terente, M. 
Thomas, Jos. W. 
Thorsen-615 
Thorsen-689 
Thorn. Edmund 
Thorn, Arvid 
ThorseU. Ch. 
J'iUman, A. 
Tillman, Chas. 

Udbye, Harold 
Undermann, F. 

Valba. H. 
Valentine, Geo. 
Valeur, Marius 
Vega. F. A. 
Velure-218 
Verbrugge, D. W. 
Verdii-k. C. 

Wahl, Robert 
Wahlstrom, Alb. 
Wakely. R. E. 
Wallin. John 
Waltland. John 
Wang, Julius 
Watson, A. J. 
Westhofer. H. 
Westlund, Wm. 
Wetzel, Curt 
Wetland, John 
Wevnian, Emil 
Wibbed, Louis W. 

Zimmerman, F. 
Ziinnu'rling, F. 



Lommos, Henri 

Ludors. C 
I^undgren, -1295 
Lundberg, John 
Lundberg, Fred 
Lubke. J. 

McEmbers, R. 
McKinley, Wm. 
Meetz. H. 
Mehent, Joe 
Melin, -1712 
Mills. G. A. 
Mersman. A. 
Mesak, Edw. 
Mikkelsen. A. S. 
Miller, Jas. 
Mittemeyer. J. F. 
Moller. L. 
Monroe, Geo. E. 
Munze, Dick 

Nilsen. -346 
Nilsson, Henning 
Nilsson 895 
Nils.son, Adolf H. 
Nilsson. Edw. 
Nilsson, -935 
Nilsson, Carl F. 
Nobereit. Gus 
Norris, N. A. 
Norvik, Morten 
Nurnii, V. 
Nurman, V. 

Olsson. Alf. 
Olsson. J. W. 
Olsson, Karl 
Opderbeck, E. 
Osolin, Oso. 
Osol. Th. R. 
Osterdahl, Chas. 
Otttni. Axel 
Ounpaum, A. 
Owen, Fred. 



Petersen, Karl O. 
Peterson, -499 
Petterson, Gust. 
Petterson, Anton 
Petterson-lls6 
Petterson, O. S. 
Pettersen. O. T. 
Petterson, Oscar 
Pinkiert, CI. 
Poder, J. 
Potters, J. 

Pratt 

Purnhagen, Ludv. 

Robsham, Jens W. 
Rokov, Steffan 
Rolls. W. 
Rommel, Andrew 
Rost, K. G. 
Rosenbold, T. 
Rozeness, G. 
Rylts, A. 
Ryberg. S. 

Silfoerberg. Harold 
SUventus, W. R. 
Simpson. L. ('. 
Simpson, L. C. 
Slnder, Victor 
Skagman, W. A. 
Smith, Fred 
Smith, -648 
Smith, Jas. B. 
Soderlund, A. 
Soland, Hans 
Solberg, T. 
Sorensen, S. M. 
Sorensen, A. 
Southerland, A. 
Sovik. H. 
Sprague, C. B. 
Stageland, P. 
Stetn, John 
Stephens, W. G. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Suominen, N. 
Svendsen, Otto 
Svane, Albert 
Svensson-1795 
Svensson-1795 
Svensson-1932 
Swensson, Martin 
Swansson, Emil 

Tiller. E. 
Tipp, T. 
Tone, H. 
Tollefsen, Aug. 
Tollefsen, Andreas 
Torkelsen, Marinus 
Torvik, Olaf 
Trenton, Louis 
Tupitz, C. 
Turner, Ted 

Utves, K. L. 

Vestman, A. 

Virkers, John 

Vinje, Hilmar 

Vogel-214 

von den Steene, J. 

Vongehr, Ewald 



Wiberg. E. A. 
Wk'kman, P. 
Wikland, Chas. 
Wikstrom, O. 
Wllhelmsen, G. 
Will, C. 
Wilke, Wm. 
Willman, Frans-1020 
Wilson, Fred 
Winters. Ch. 
Witol. E. 
Witt. August 
Wold. H. 

Zweyberg. .T. 



PACKAGES. 
Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Andersson, Vlcktor Johannessen, -186S 
.Atkinson. Samuel Kolstad. Anton 
Holmstrom, Carl A. Pietila. -1338 
Jensen, -1944 Ruthberg, E. 

Johnson, Chas. Torkildsen, Marius 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Portland, Or., Lmttmr List. 



Alfo, John 
Aeckerle. Ernst 
Anderson, Esktl 
Andersson, J. S. 
Berntsen, Julius 
Cox. H. E. 
Farm, J. B. 
Fostwedt, Carl 
Hultberg, Ernst 
Jensen, M. 
Jacobsen, Hans 
Johnson, C. A. 
Kearns. Edwin 
Koch, Carl 
Kjorsvik, Johan 
Kruger. Heinrich 
Kent, Jack 
Klebingat, Fred 



LIndeman. A. 
Lorin, Crlstian 
Lynd, Chas. 
Moren, E. H. 
Olson. Olaf 
Olson, Otto 
Ponnl Anton 
Patterson, A. K. 
Roalsen, Fred 
Rasmussen, Andrew 
Scott. Ed. 
Sundholm, Freppa 
Schultz, Ernst 
Schmidt, Franz 
Schneider, William 

I. 
Sanchez, Frank 
Tamm, P. 



Tacoma, Wash., Lstter List. 

Anderson, A. B. Jacobsen, Olai 

.Anderson, Chas. -907Johanson, Emil 

Behrent, E. -1579 Larsen. Holger 



Berndt, Hugo 
Buhmeister. John 
Chapman, F. 
Charlson, M. 



Lund, Peter 
McGuire, George 
Meyers, Chas. 
Nilsen, Oscar L. 



Christofferson, Emil Nordenberg, John 



Clausen, Nils 
Davey, Chas. 
Ekblom, Alfred 
Eklund, Sven W. 
Eliasen, E. -396 
Franzell, A. 



Olsen, Ole Johan 
Olsen, Sigvald 
Poppe. George 
Ratshet, August 
Saunders, J. 
Sovig, Chas. 



Frederickson, F. H. Swanson, Ben 
-529 Turner. Alfred 

Hansen, Pete Turner, Richard 

Harris, J. Wells, Leo L. 

Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Ahrens, W. 
Anderson, E. 
Alexander, K. 
Arnold, E. B. 
Anderson, P. T. 
Anderson, Harry 
Andersson, J. R. 
Anderson. -1534 
-Abbors, A. 
Anderson, Sven 
Appelgreen, J. 
Buchtman, F. 
Billington, M. 
Birkelund, R. 
Busse, Ch. 
Brandt. N. 
Benson, Jon. 
Boosban, Ch. 
Carlson, K. J. 
,Christensen, H. 
Ciirlstensen. C. E. 
Duval, Benolt 
Dories, H. 
Dowe, J. 
Domhoff, J. 
Drager, Otto 
Eichel, Ch. 
Eliassen, H. -S99 
Eliassen, G. -1427 
Focketyn, F. 
Furman, F. 
Frank, F. -499 
Goepper, Ch. 
Godley, Geo. 
Hansen. H. M. 
Haniger, A. J. 
Hammond, J. A. 
Hammerquist, A. J. 



Hope, Ole 
Jacobsen, -1786 
Johansson. 1700 
Johannesson, J. 
Jacobsen, Eriand 
Jensen, L. 
Jalonen, J. 
Johannesen, Carsten 
Kristlansen, L. 
Kavander, W. 
Koskinen, W. 
Long, L. 
Lerch, Paul 
Lewis. G. H. 
Lundgreen, C. 
Matsson, Karl 
Morris, Oscar 
Mulley, James 
Malbom, H. 
Mefge, G. 
Morden, J. 
MIchalsen, J. 
Nielsen, V. -1000 
Olen, Thorn. 
Orten, S. 
Pierson, A. 
Pederson, -896 
Petersen, C. 
Pedersen, James 
Rantanen, -770 
Rustanious, J. 
Quistgard, C. 
Swales, A. E. 
Swansen, Carl 
Syversen, H. 
Tuvfeson, Knut 
Taddlken, A. 
Vongher, Ed. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Anders»tn, S\"fM 
Beliiens, E. -1549 
Boyle. John- 
Chapman. F. S. 
Hillig, Albert 
Holtberg. John C. 
Johansen, - 2021 
Knucken, T. 
Klebingal, Fred 



Lundgren. Carl 
McCallum. Charles 
Nagel. Arthur 
Peterson. Paul 
Rosenfeld. L. 
Stabell, Frank 
Sundquist. Carl 
Walser, Ernest 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S LETTER LIST.. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Letters at the Alaska Fishermen's of- 
fice will be advertised for six months 
only and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of seven months 
from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify the 
Secretary of the Alaska Fishermen's 
Union of their present address, in order 
to have their mail forwarded them. 



Andreasen, Mogens 
Andersen. August 
Bakke. E. G. 
Benson, John 
Flynn. Mark 
Farrell, Henry D. 
Gulliksen, Gustav 
Green. John 
Hagen, G. L. 
Hansen, Harry 
Haglund. Wm. 
Hammerin, F. EX 
Johnson, George P. 



Kerr. Wm. 
l^agucrwall. Ernst 
Lofman. K. 
Lahmeyer, H. 
Mullen. James E. 
Nielsen. Carl Johan 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olson, Ole 
Olsen, Olaf 
Prescott. Fred 
Riisc, Wm. 
Thompson, A. 
Tonnessen, Jorgen 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Anderson, H. A. 

-1449 
Anderson, Olof 
Anderson. S. 
Arnmii, Walter 
Bartels, C. H. 
Beary, Charles 
Bentsen, Bent 
Blunt. H. 
Bos from. C. 



Lambar, Ermlnio 
Lorensen, Orgt. C. 
Micheii, Agojtino 
Mittemeijer. .1. F. 
Newman. J. S. 
Niccolai, Sant 
Nilsen. Ruder S. 
Nylund. Sven 
Olson. Bror 
Oman, Vlcktor 



Brander, Frank -14430Isen. O. 
Christensen, H. C. Oterdahl. Charles 



Clemensen. C. H. 
Conaughton, H. 
Edlund. Gust 
Geiger, Joseph 
(Jrant. John 
Gunther. Theo. 
Oustafson, Edvart 
Halvorsen, Ingval 
Hollins. Frank 
Ixa.arson, Gustav 
Johnsen, J. 
Karlsson, A. E. 
Kittelsen. Chritian 
Knudsen, Jacob E. 



Pateejanski. R. 
Pedersen. P. G. 
Penny. Matt. 
Salmlnen. K. W. 
Shuils. Christ 
Sjellman, Joniis 
Svensen, Olof 
Stabell. Frank 
Teigland, G. 
Thoresen, G. 
Thoresen, Petter 
Walbreth, Carl 
Wickstroni, Chart. 
Yannt, C. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourtli and IVIari<et Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

(Member of the A.ssociateil Savings Banks of 

Sau Fi-auci.sco. ) 

S26 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in casli 1,000.000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,504,498.68 

Deposits, June 30, 1909 36,793,234.04 

Total Assets 39, 435,681. 3!S 

Remittance may be made by draft, postoffice 
or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s money orders, or coin hy 
express. 

Office hours — 10 o'clock a.m. to 3 o'clock p.m., 
except Saturdays to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday 
evenings from 7 o'clock p.m. to 8 o'clock p.m. 
tor receipt of deposits only. 
Officers. 
President, N. Ohlandt: first vice president, 
Daniel Meyer: second vice president. Emil Itolite; 
cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; assistant cashier. 
William Herrmann; secretary, George Tourny; 
assistant secretary. A. H. Muller; Goodfellow 
& Eells, general attorneys. 

Board of Directors. 
N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte. Ign. 
Steinhardt. I. N. Walter. J. W. Van Bergen, 
F. Tillmann Jr., B. T. Kruse and W. S. Good- 
fellow. 

Mission Branch, 2.572 Mission street, between 
Twenty-flrst and 'Twenty-second streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 

C. W. Heyer, Manager. 
Richmond District Branch, 432 Clement 
Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. 
For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
W. C. Heyer, Manager. 

HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 
Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 2Sc to 
75c per day. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
|2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 

HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 weelc; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 

THE ADMIRAL 

146 EAST STREET 

100 large, nicely furnished rooms from 
35c to $2 per day, $2 to $5 per week. 

Electric Light and Call Bells. Hot and 
Cold Water, and Clean, Sanitary Bedding 
in Every Room. Electric Elevator Ser- 
vice. Free Baths. 

FERRY HOUSE 

CORNER EAST AND MISSION STS. 

Opposite Ferry Building 
EARTHQUAKE AND FIREPROOF 
The only house in the block between 
Market and Mission streets which was not 
injured by the great catastrophe of 1906. 
Nice Sunny Furnished Rooms from 2Bc 
to $2 per day; $1.50 to $6 per week; rooms 
for two persons $2.50 per week. 

BANNERS, REGALIA, ETC. 

Gold Bullion, Silk Embroidered and 
Painted Silk and Satin Banners; Hand 
Embroidered Silk American and Spe- 
cial Flags; Reversible and Ribbon 
Parade Badges; Silk and Satin Sashes 
and Regalia. All Union Made and 
Manufactured by 

THE WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 

860 Mission St. Phone Kearny 1966 

Patronize Home Industry. 

BXPRESSIINQ 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411 San Francisco 

JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
109 STEUAR TS T. , San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 
BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CIGAR CO., NANUrACTURCRS 

133 HARTFORD ST., S. F. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

or CAuroRMU 

MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 

Branches: 624 Van Ness Avenue and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letters of Credit Issued, payable in all parts of tlie world. 
Chas. F. Leege, Pres. W. A. Frederick, Vice-Pres. B. G. TognazzI, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vice-Pres. 



SOMETHING NEAV 

TKe Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

" ANTIDOTE. " 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
t a n t Advantages 
which can be found 
In No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking In. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first tew smokes in 
an ordinary Pipe. 

First Smoke in 

"ANTIDOTE" 

as sweet as 

ordinary Pipe 

sweetened by Long 

Usage. 

2. Tlie "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 
protects the briar. 

3. Tlie "ANTI- 
DOTE" is always 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing it to pass off into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

RASSER BROS. 




Distributors 
19 MARKET STREET, S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, 
Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 



Cal. 



Best Suits in Town 

for the money 

at 

Capt.C.J.Swanson 

Up-to-date Clothier 
and Gents' Furnisher 

OilsKins, Gold Seal 

Rubberboots 

Uniforms, Hats and 

Shoes 

Pants a Specialty 

Tlie main essential to working 
pants arc good material and good 
workmanship. Then, as it costs no 
more, they may as well be properly 
cut. You get all these in "Stag" 
Union-made Trousers, guaranteed 
not to rip. Good for all purposes, 
priced $1 up to $7. 

119 EAST STREET 

Phone Douglas 1082 

San Francisco 







SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light blue) 
appears on the box in which 
you are served. 



Issued by AuUlorityof ine Ciga/ MaKefs' Imernational Union of America 

Union-made Cigars 

Shis CCfVtiftf?. 'IBI tht CI9111 contained inlhls b<» Imm bwi miOa by J FllSt-CUSS WMWUn 
iHLmtHOI THE aCAR U/ulEia'inlCRKATIOIUL mOHd Amt.'iu, jn otiiiujbai devoted hi the ad. 
vjncenuil or tile MORAi MATOflMjnd IMQUaiWI WIKARL Of TK( CRATT. Ihei«<or««e recmocDd 
UI8M Civrs to ill snKAers throuQtiout Xh8 Mortd 
T AJI h(Tiftg«ntiiu upon U11S Label wilbe punujied jcoydingtolaw 




The management ' of the Omaha 
street-car company has refused to sub- 
mit the dispute with its employes to 
arbitration. 

The mines of the Kingwood Coal 
Company at Howesville, W. Va., have 
resumed operations with a large force. 
The Irona mines are also working. 

An increase of 10 per cent in the 
wages of its 2000 employes in the Le- 
high Valley was announced recently 
by the Thomas Iron Coinpany, of 
Easton, Pa. 

Canadian railroad officials complain 
of a "labor famine" and say that un- 
less a means be found of securing Asi- 
atic labor much contemplated con- 
struction work will be indefinitely 
postponed. 

An increase of 1 cent per hour for 
the 25,000 shop employes of the Bur- 
lington and Great Northern Railways, 
to take effect from September 1, was 
announced on October 1 on orders 
from James J. Hill. 

A woman's auxiliary to the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor in the 
United States was advocated at the 
second Iiiennial convention of the Na- 
tional Women's Trade-Union League 
in' session at Chicago on .Septem])er 

The United Glass Workers' Union 
called out 135 of its members em- 
ployed in three of the largest glass 
factories in San P'rancisco on Septem- 
ber 30 because the employers declined 
to grant an eight-hour day in certain 
departments. 

The jury in the second trial of the 
ten Japanese who were arrested on 
charges of rioting during the recent 
strike at the Waipahu plantation, in 
the Hawaiian Islands, disagreed on 
September 28, which amounts to an 
aci|uittal under the local law. 

The Somerset Coal Company is 
making preparations to start the fires 
in 100 coke ovens at Elk Lick mine 
No. 1, one mile south of Meyersdale, 
Md. The company has nearly 400 
ovens at that place and before long 
all will be in blast. 

Potts Brothers' puddle mill, at 
Pottstown, Pa., which has been idle 
for many months, resumed on Octo- 
ber 4. With this plant in operation 
practically all the iron mills in the 
vicinity will be running, something 
that has not occurred since 1907. 

Chief Factory Inspector Delaney of 
Pennsylvania has ordered suit to be 
brought against Byers & Co., owners 
of a Tyrone planing mill, for violating 
the factory laws. An employe lost 
several fingers at a planer and the fac- 
tory inspector for the district reported 
the case. 

Fearing Governor Marshall would 
cancel his engagement to review the 
German Day celebration in Evansville, 
Ind., on September 29, because of an 
implied insult to State authority, the 
committee in charge of the festival re- 
considered the protest of the Brewery 
Workers' Union against companies of 
militia being allowed to join in the 
procession, and announced that it 
would not accede. 

The American Federation of Labor, 
through Secretary Morrison, voices 
its approval of the action proposed 
by the San Francisco Labor Council 
to organize the unskilled migratory 
laborers of the Pacific Coast. In a 
letter to the Labor Council, Secretary 
Morrison states that the Executive 
Council of the Federation, at its next 
meeting, will most likely vote a sum 
of money in aid of the project. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Not Yet, But Sometime. — Man from 
the City — "You intend to keep bees, 
I suppose?" 

Suburbanite— "Some day, perhaps. 
At present we are devoting our entire 
energies to keeping a cook." — Chicago 
Tribune. 



Arborically Speaking.— "I suppose 
you know of my family tree?" said 
Baron Fucash. 

"Yes," answered Mr. Cunirox. "It 
may have been a good tree, all right, 
but it looks to me as if the crop was 
a failure." — Washington Star. 



The Hater of Quietude.— "That 
man says he will create some real ex- 
citement if he gets into Congress." 

"Yes," answered Senator Sorghum, 
"he is one of those peculiar patriots 
who want to climb on hoard the ship 
of state simply for the pleasure of 
rocking the boat." — Washington Star. 



Be of good cheer, put fear to rout. 
Call back the hope that's fled; 
I'or many good friends will gladly 
shout 
Your praises — 
(when 
you're 
dead.) 

— St. Louis Star. 



Same Thing There. — Traveler (in- 
specting the village from the car win- 
dow) — "Seems to me the streets of 
your little town are awfully dirty." 

Uncle Welby Gosh (on the station 
platform) — "I know it, mister, but 
we're so blamed busy making plans 
fur a Drearyhurst Beautiful that we 
hain't got no time to clean 'em." — 
Chicago Tribune. 



"I Told You So." — .'\n old couple 
lived in the mountains of Eastern 
Tennessee; he was 95 and she 90. 
Their son, a man of 70, died. .\s the 
old folks crossed the pasture to their 
cabin after the burial the woman 
noticed a tear roll down her hus- 
band's cheek. She patted him ten- 
derly on the arm and said: 

"Never mind, John, never mind; you 
know I always said we never would 
raise tliat boy." — Success Magazine. 



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furnishings 
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PAGE 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

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Seamen's Journal. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, (or Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Oiganization. 




VOL. XXIII. No. 4. 


SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 13. 1909. 


Whole No. 2038. 









BRITISH TRADE-UNION CONGRESS. 



Til J:: FORTY-SECOND anmial Congress 
of the Trade-Unions of the United King- 
dom was held at the Public Hall, Ipswich, 
r)n Monday, September 6, and the five follow- 
ing days. The Congress was presided over 
l)y the Chairman of the Parliamentary Com- 
mittee, Mr. D. J. Shackleton, M. P. The stand- 
ing orders of the Congress provide tliat it shall 
consist only of representatives of trade-unions 
who are actually working at their trades at the 
time of their appointment, or are permanent 
paid officials of the unions they represent. Trade- 
unions may send one delegate for every 2,000 
members or fraction thereof, but many of the 
larger unions do not send the full number of 
delegates to which they are entitled. Voting on 
inip(jrtant questions is by card, on the principle 
of one vote for every 1,000 members represented. 
The analysis into groups of trades given below 
shows the composition of the Congress, and the 
trade groups represented are compared with the 
corresponding figures for the Congress of 1908; 



1908. 



1909. 



Group.s of Trades. 



Building I 9 

Mining and Quarrying! 10 

Engineering I 13 

Shipbuilding (inelud-| 

ing- Boiler-making)! 

Other Metal Trades..! 

Textiles I 

Clothing I 

Transport (i..and andj 

Water) I 14 

Chemical, Gas and( 

General Laborers...! 

Printing, Bookbind-! 

ing, &c 

Pottery and Glass. . 
Woodworking and 
Furnishing, &e... 
Baking and Cigar- 
making 

Enginemen 

Postoffl<e employees 

Miseellaneoiis ! 

Total !163 




!519|1 



5 
27 

5 
31 

!49711,651.289 



The number of organizations accounted for in 
the above statement is 133, but some of these or- 
ganizations are federations having members of 
several of their constituent trade-unions in at- 
tendance at the Congress. Allowing for such 
cases, members of about 219 trade-unions at- 
tended as delegates this year out of about 1,150 
unions in existence. The membership represented, 
however, comprised 70 per cent of the total mem- 
bership of all trade-unions. The decline of 60,000 
in the membership represented as compared with 
1908 occurred chiefly in the building, transport 
and labor groups, and was partly due to the ab 



sence of some unions which were represented at 
the previous Congress. 

Among the principal subjects on which the 
Congress passed resolutions were: Restriction of 
the hours of labor to eight per day for work- 
people generally; Old-Age Pensions; amendment 
"f the Mines Regulation Act, the Factory and 
Workshop Acts, and the Compensation to Work- 
men Act; the wages and general conditions of 
labor of workers employed by contractors for the 
Government; labor exchanges; compulsory State 
insurance; trade boards; evictions during trade 
disputes; State help for blind workpeople; aboli- 
tion of the premium bonus system; and secular 
education. A resolution in favor of compulsory 
arbitration in trade disputes was rejected by a 
large majority. 

Substantially the resolution on compulsory ar- 
bitration declared "that the Congress, recognizing 
the futility and wastefulness of the strike as a 
means of settling trade disputes, hereby affirms 
the principle of conciliation and arbitration in all 
such disputes, and is of the opinion that the time 
has arrived in the direction of conferring com- 
pulsory powers on the Board of Trade to inquire 
into any industrial .disputes when requested by 
either party. Pending such inquiry and report 
no strike or lockout shall take place." In reject- 
ing the proposal for compulsory arbitration the 
Congress re-affirmed the stand taken by all pre- 
vious Congresses against that method of dealing 
with industrial disputes. 

Among the more important resolutions adopted 
was one embodying an "emphatic condemnation 
of any direct or indirect compulsory enlistment 
of the working classes into the territorial forces,"' 
and also condemning "the regulations which per- 
mit these forces to be used in suppressing trade 
disputes." An amendment calling for "a citizen 
army free from military law in times of peace" 
was rejected by a vote of 933,000 to 102,000. 

A resolution providing for the appointment of 
a Minister of Labor with full Cabinet rank was 
passed, as was also a resolution calling upon the 
members of organized labor "to fall into line 
with their comrades of other countries to demon- 
strate on Labor Day in order to demand the in- 
stitution of a legal eight-hour day, and to main- 
tain the interests of the working class generally 
in the cause of industrial peace, by the suspen- 
sion of work on May 1." A resolution to estalj- 
lish a labor daily newspaper in London, for which 
$750,000 would be needed, was voted down. The 
Government's scheme for labor exchanges, and 
the proposition for insurance against unemploy- 
ment, were approved. 

The union label received more than usual atten- 
tion from the Congress. The label of the .Vmal- 



gamated Society of Tailors and Tailoresses was 
indorsed. Heretofore only the Hatmakers have 
adoijted the label. The action of the Congress, in 
indorsing the Tailors' label is regarded as an in- 
dication of the future use of the union label on 
a large scale. 

A measure proposing that the Government 
should "consider the propriety of making 'grants- 
in-aid' to organizations supporting their members 
during periods of slackness by the iiayment of 
out-of-work benefit" was rejected by a small ma- 
jority, upon the ground that such a scheme would 
hamper trade-union activities and could not be 
made to conform to the methods of union admin- 
istration. Resolutions were adopted condemning 
the "provisions of the American Copyright Acts 
whereby copyright is refused to any Britis-h pub- 
lication unless the type is actually set up and the 
whole of the plates are produced in America," 
thereby "crippling the printing and paper indus- 
try" of Great Britain; favoring the reduction of 
the Old-Age Pension limit to 60 years, with the 
abolition of disqualifications contained in the 
present Act; protesting against the recent con- 
tiscation of Justice, a Socialist paper, as "an at- 
tack on the freedom of the press more charac- 
teristic of Russian despotism than the Govern- 
ment of a professedly democratic country"; de- 
manding electoral reform by providing for the 
payment of Members of Parliament, the holding 
of all general elections on the same day, a more 
e(|uitable distribution of seats, the abolition of 
plural voting and university representation, and 
the extension of the franchise to all adults, male 
and female. Proportional Representation was 
voted down by a large majority. 

Fraternal delegates were present from the 
Labor party, the Co-Operative Union, the Board 
of Trade, the General Federation of Trade- 
Unions, and the American Federation of Labor. 
The representatives of the latter l)ody were 
Messrs. B. .A. Larger and John P. Frey, with 
President Samuel Gompers as a special represen- 
tative this year. The Federation's delegates were 
well received, President Gompers being greeted 
with great enthusiasm. Among the delegates to 
the Congress were thirty-three Members of Par- 
liament, twenty-six Justices of the Peace, one 
Mayor, six Aldermen and eighteen Councillors. 
There were four women delegates. Messrs. J. 
R. Clyncs, M. P., Gasworkcrs and General La- 
borers, and A. H. Gill, M. P., Amalgamated As- 
sociation of Cotton Spinners, were elected fra- 
ternal delegates to the Toronto convention of 
the American Federation of Labor. 

The voting by Congress for members of the 
Parliamentary Committee for the ensuing year re- 
sulted in the election of representatives of the 
following organizations; Boilermakers and Iron 
and Steel Shipbuilders, Amalgamated Carpenters 
and Joiners, Card and Blowing Room Operatives. 
National Union of Dock Laborers, Amalgamated 
Brassworkers, Miners' Federation, London Com- 
positors, Railway Servants. Amalgamated .'\ssocia- 
tions of Weavers, .Associated Shipwrights, Pat- 
ternmakers, Shop Assistants, Bakers, Watermen 
and Lightermen, and Machine Workers. It was 
decided that the next annual Congress should be 
held at Sheffield. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TRADE DISPUTES ACT. 



It is provided by the Trade Disputes Act, 
1906, that an act done by a person in con- 
templation or furtherance of a trade dispute 
shall not be actionable on the ground only 
that it induces some other person to break 
a contract of employment, or that it is an 
interference with the trade, business, or em- 
ployment of some other person, or with the 
right of some other person to dispose of his 
capital or his labor as he wills. According 
to the Act the expression "trade dispute" 
means any dispute between employers and 
workmen, or between workmen and work- 
men, which is connected with the employ- 
ment or non-employment, or the terms of 
the employment, or with the conditions of 
labor of any person, and the expression 
"workmen" means all persons employed in 
trade or industry, whether or not in the 
employment of the employer with whom a 
trade dispute arises. 

A workman named Conway was in the 
employment of the firm of Redhead & Co. 
Eight years previously, and long before en- 
tering the employment, he had refused to 
pay a fine inflicted upon him by the trade 
union to which he belonged. Wade was a 
delegate of this union. Wade had an inter- 
view with the foreman of the works where 
Conway was employed and induced the fore- 
man to dismiss Conway by threats that un- 
less he was dismissed the union men in 
Messrs. Redhead's service would leave off 
work. In so acting Wade was acting with- 
out the authority of the trade union, but at 
the instigation of some of the members. 
In these circumstances Conway brought an 
action for damages in the County Court 
against Wade, and after hearing evidence 
the judge left the following questions to the 
jury, which were answered by the jury as 
stated: (1) Was there a trade dispute ex- 
isting or contemplated by the men? — No. 
(2) Did they communicate this fact to 
Wade? — No. (3) Did Wade act in conse- 
quence of such communication? — No. (4) 
Did Wade utter any threat to any employer 
of Conway?— Yes. (5) Did what Wade did 
prevent, or was it intended to prevent, the 
plaintiff from getting or retaining employ- 
ment? — Yes. (6) Was it done in order to 
compel the plaintiff to pay arrears of fine? — 
Yes. (7) Was it done in order to punish 
the plaintiff for not paying such arrears? — 
Yes. (8) Was what the defendant did done 
only to warn the employers that the union 
men would leave in consequence of their 
being unwilling to work with Conway? — 
No. (9) Was it done in consequence of the 
men objecting to work with the plaintiff? — 
No. (10) Did he do anything more than act 
on behalf of the men employed at Redhead's? 
— Yes. The jufy found for the plaintiff with 
damages £50, and judgment was entered 
accordingly. The defendant asked for a new 
trial, which request the County Court judge 
refused. The defendant appealed from such 
refusal to the High Court, but the High 
Court upheld the decision of the County 
Court judge. The defendant appealed fur- 
ther to the Court of Appeal, and that Court 
allowed the appeal, on the ground that the 
defendant had acted in contemplation or 
furtherance of a trade dispute. Against this 
decision the plaintiff appealed to the House 
of Lords. The House of Lords held that 
apart from the facts (upon which the find- 
ings of the jury must be taken as conclu- 



sive) the only defense to the action was that 
the defendant had acted in contemplation or 
furtherance of a trade dispute, and that he 
was therefore protected by the Act. The 
.\ct means that either a dispute is imminent 
and the act complained of is done in expecta- 
tion and with a view to it; or that the dis- 
pute is already existing and the act is done 
in support of one side to it. In either case 
the act must be genuinely done in contem- 
plation or furtherance of the dispute, and 
the dispute must be a real thing imminent 
or existing. The protection is not confined 
to acts done by a party to the dispute ; 
though if some meddler tried to use a trade 
dispute as a cloak under which to interfere 
with impunity in other people's business, a 
jury would be justified in saying that what 
he did was done, not in contemplation or 
in furtherance of a trade dispute, but of his 
own designs. In this case, according to the 
findings of the jury, the defendant had acted 
in a spirit of hostility to the plaintiff with 
the object of depriving him of his employ- 
ment, and not in contemplation or further- 
ance of any trade dispute, therefore the de- 
fendant was not protected by the Act. The 
House of Lords therefore refused to inter- 
fere with the judgment obtained in the Coun- 
ty Court, overruled the Court of Appeal, and 
allowed the appeal. — Conway vs. Wade, 
House f)f Lords, April 26 and 27, and July 
26. 1909. 



GOLD AND COST OF LIVING. 



'J'here is renewed complaint all over the 
country of the high and still rising cost of 
living. This troublesome condition is by 
some people being associated with the up- 
ward tariff revision in several important 
schedules ; by others it is felt to be somehow 
related to the European shortage and gen- 
eral high prices of breadstuff's. The fact, 
however, that the rise is practically univer- 
sal both as respects commodities and coun- 
tries, shows that neither the American tariff 
nor the foreign shortage in foodstuffs is re- 
sponsible. I'oth the London Economist and 
Sauerbeck's jjrice index numbers, computed 
from foreign markets, record a marked up- 
ward trend, which has already nearly over- 
come the fall resulting from the panic of 
1907. The latter number' now stands at 
7,^.1, against 72, tlie low record of the panic 
period, and 80, the high record of the pre- 
ce<lin,g boom period. That is for London, 
where recovery from the depression is slow. 
In this country, as has been noted in these 
columns, average prices, according to Hrad- 
strcct's. have reached a point even nearer 
the high record of the pre-jianic jieriod. 

The truth of the matter seems to l)e that 
the world is now undergoing to a degree 
such an experience as came upon it after 
the disco\ery of America and the flooding 
of Europe with the great silver supplies of 
the Incas and the mines of Potosi. As a re- 
sult, that chief money metal of the time was 
enormously depreciated. From 1570 to 1640 
])rices rose 200 and more per cent, and the 
consequences to the classes living on fixed 
incomes were most serious, leading to large 
pauperization, especially of the wage-earn- 
ing classes, who held a low place in the so- 
cial scale and could not band together to 
force up their wages proportionately. It is 
a curious fact that the English crown itself 
was a chief sufferer next to the wage class- 



es, since the- Crown revenues were largely 
flerived from lands in such a manner as to 
preclude any advantage from the rising 
prices of foodstuffs. History further tells us 
that the landed proprietors profited greatly 
from the money depreciation or increasing 
l^rices — as our American farmers have been 
prospering under the present similar experi- 
ence; while the next class to profit was the 
middle or trading class, whose business was 
then highly individualized, and not, as now, 
concentrated into great employing concerns, 
with comparatively few owners to share the 
increasing profits from rising prices, and a 
\ast army of clerical employes, who are in 
much the same position as the wage-earn- 
ers of the sixteenth and seventeenth centu- 
ries. 

.As for the average citizen in the crush of 
rising costs of living there is to be discerned 
for him little hope of relief this side of the 
beginnings of exhaustion in gold produc- 
tion, or a change in the monetary standard, 
which is not likely and not presently advis- 
able. Against this rising cost of living great 
numbers of the industrial classes find more 
tlian am])le protection in rising prices for 
what they produce or sell, and the conse- 
(|uent appreciation of rental values — the 
farmers, the manufacturers and the trading 
or mercantile classes who buy on a rising 
market but sell later on with the market still 
rising. The creditor class, who benefit from 
a condition of monetary appreciation, will 
continue to suffer as in the last ten years, 
hut to a growingly less degree as they are 
al)le to force a higher average rate of inter- 
est. The organized wage classes will also 
suffer, but to a growingly less degree as 
they are able to force up their wages, which 
will still lag a little behind the rise in prices 
and rents — a process that may be attended 
by more strike disturbances than were ex- 
perienced in the pre-panic period. But for 
that large class of unorganized labor — the 
unskilled wage-earners and the subordinate 
salaried men of manufacturing and mercan- 
tile and transportation and mining and oth- 
er industries — upon them rests the great 
weight of the disadvantages arising from 
the conditions and changes under discus- 
sion. Their lot is a hard one, and the mi- 
nority of their numbers places their case 
beyond easy remedy. — Springfield, Mass., 
Republican. 



BRITISH RAILWAY ACCIDENTS. 



.According to the report of the British 
Board of Trade, the railway accidents and 
casualties in the I'nited Kingdom for the 
year 1908 were as follows: Killed, 1,043; in- 
jured, 7.984; against 1.117 killed and 8,811 
injured in 1907. 

The deaths and injuries occurred under 
the following conditions : Accidents to 
trains, rolling stock, or permanent way — pas- 
sengers killed, none ; passengers injured, 
283; employes killed, 6; injured, 164. Acci- 
dents on railways other than the foregoing 
— passengers killed. 102; injured, 2,240; em- 
])loves killed, 376; injured, 4,976. Accidents 
in passing over railways at level crossings — 
killed, 51; injured, 44. Trespassers and in- 
tending suicides — killed, 479; injured, 118. 
.\'ot coming under foregoing categories — 
killed, 29; injured, 150. Accidents occurring 
ui)on railwav premises, but in which vehicles 
used exclusively upon railways were not con- 
cerned — killed, 85; injured, 20,861. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SECRETARY FRAZIER'S LAKE TRIP. 



A meeting of the Lake District Grievance 
Committee was held at Buffalo on Septem- 
ber 16, at which the International Secretary 
was present. The meeting was called to 
order by Vice-President Olander, and the 
condition of the strike on the Great Lakes 
was thoroughly gone into. Secretary Frazier 
reported that the assessment money was 
coming in and that he was able to commence 
payment to the affiliated unions, which was 
a welcome report to the men out on strike, 
though in no actual need of money at the 
time. 

The committee, upon the advice of the 
International Secretary, wired Mr. J. Have- 
lock Wilson, President of the National Sail- 
ors and Firemen's Union of Great Britain, 
to come to Buffalo for the purpose of ad- 
dressing a mass meeting. Mr. Wilson 
quickly responded, and was on hand for the 
meeting. The meeting was called to order 
by Mr. Edward Stack, President of the 
Marine Firemen of the Great Lakes, who in- 
troduced Mr. Victor Olander, Vice-Presi- 
dent of the International Seamen's Union of 
America and Secretary of the Lake Seamen's 
Union, who reviewed the strike from its 
inception to the present day, showing the 
difference between the definition of the 
"Open Shop," as given by the employers, 
and their actual instructions to their cap- 
tains, the employers stating in the papers 
that the "Open Shop" meant no discrimination 
between men who belonged to the Union and 
those who did not, that they did not intend 
to ask any man whether he belonged to a 
union or not — that was his (the man's) busi- 
ness, and not theirs (the employers). Mr. 
Olander had a letter from a very prominent 
shipowner of Cleveland, Mr. John Mitchell, 
of the Mitchell line, to one of his captains, 
telling him not to hire any sailors who had 
union books unless they were willing to give 
them up, and saying further that "what was 
wanted was to rid the ships of union men," 
also "not to allow any union delegates on 
board, if so their resignation would be asked 
for." 

Mr. W. H. Frazier, Secretary-Treasurer, 
followed Mr. Olander, and delivered the fol- 
lowing message from the men of the Coast : 

"You furnish the fighting spirit, and we 
will furnish the ammunition. The seamen 
on salt water understand this fight to be as 
much their fight as it is the fight of the fresh- 
water men, and do not propose to see them 
licked. They understand what it would 
mean if the Lake Carriers should be allowed 
to establish the 'Welfare' plan, which is 
nothing more than the English, 'Shipping 
Federation' over again." 

Mr. J. Havelock Wilson was the main 
speaker of the evening. He went into the 
history of the English "Shipping Federa- 
tion," its method and the results to the sea- 
men of Great Britain. He showed that the 
Federation had made the same promises that 
the "Welfare" plan does now. "There shall 
be no reduction in wages or conditions" were 
the promises of the Federation. Yet as soon 
as they had seamen of Great Britain under 
their control the wages dropped from £.t10 
to £3. The "Shipping Federation" ]:)romiscd 
them all jobs, yet to-day men are trampling 
each other to death to eet their "book" into 



the shipmaster's hands. Once they had got 
men in this condition, they said to them- 
selves ; "Now, we only want the best of the 
men," and they commenced a system of phys- 
ical examination. So now when a man is 
successful in getting his book into the hands 
of the shipmaster, he goes before the doctor 
and strips off his clothing for the physical 
examination, and over 50 per cent have been 
alleged by this doctor to be ruptured. They 
have to buy a truss costing from 5 to 10 shill- 
ings, though the same men have been ex- 
amined by other and more reputable phys- 
icians, who were unable to find anything the 
matter with the men. Nor is this all. After 
they have passed this doctor, he stamps 
them on the back of the hand, "passed, S. F. 
L." ("Shipping Federation Limited"), just 
like so much beef that has been inspected by 
the Government inspectors. 

All this was fully explained by Mr. Wil- 
son, who held the attention of his audience. 
The meeting was also addressed by Mr. 
Coleman, President of the Central Labor 
Union of Buffalo, who spoke on general 
trade-union lines and pledged the support 
of the organized labor of Buffalo to the 
strikers. The attendance was about 1000 
seamen, shore-workers and citizens. 

We decided upon a tour of the Lakes, and 
made arrangements for a meeting in Cleve- 
land. W^e met in the Firemen's Hall, hav- 
ing a very good meeting of some 350, com- 
posed of sailors, firemen, cooks, engineers 
and citizens. About the same program was 
gone through as at Buffalo. Later a meet- 
ing was held in Toledo, where for lack of 
advertising we did not have such a large 
meeting, only about 150, but we told our 
story to them, and no doubt it reached 
many more. 

In Detroit we held a most successful 
meeting in the Engineers' hall. The hall was 
jannned to its utmost, over 400 being pres- 
ent. Practically the same program was ad- 
hered to. The crowd was enthusiastic, and 
the speeches were well received. W^e spoke 
to the men of Chicago in the Seamen's Hall 
on West Madison street, where we had the 
hall filled to its utmost capacity. The story 
of the strike, the assistance that could be 
expected, and the "Federation" were again 
told in the most effective manner, and what 
might be expected if they allowed this strike 
to be lost. Following this we were in Mil- 
waukee, where we held a good meeting, tell- 
ing them the same- story. We also added 
to our address the advantage it would have 
been if the Union had adopted the resolution 
of changing their dues from 50c to 75c, and 
I am glad to report that it seemed to have 
met with the approval of the entire meet- 
ing, as it met with the approval of meet- 
ings held later. We then returned to Chi- 
cago, and took an evening off, but on the 
following afternoon we held a very good 
meeting in South Chicago in the Firemen's 
hall. 

Monday night being the regular meeting 
night for the Seamen's Union we made no 
date. We left Chicago Monday night to 
meet our engagement in Ashtabula Llarbor. 
Here we found a most peculiar condition. 
The entire town is completely controlled by 
the Steel Trust. All of the waterfront is 
completely enclosed by tall fences with 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 15^ 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 85 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London E.. 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull, 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverbaiid Seeniannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 

Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

Denmark. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond. 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 

Federazione Nazionale dci Lavoratori del Mare, 
Geneva Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 

Austria. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques v pnerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, I (Bar- 
celoneta) Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvetto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. - 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The Australian Federated Savvniill 
and Timberyard Employes' Union is 
restating a case to be again brought 
before the Federal Arbitration Court. 
The Victorian Railway Department 
recently advertised 802 vacancies in 
the permanent service. The Minister 
for Railways stated that no fewer 
than 14,000 applications had been re- 
ceived for the different positions. 

Giving evidence in Sydney, Aus- 
tralia, before the Saturday Half-Holi- 
day Commission, a witness stated the 
effect of a universal Saturday half- 
holiday in Queensland was to mini- 
mize drinking and drunkenness. 

The Director of Labor in New 
South Wales states that the iron 
trades generally, wharf-laborers, coal- 
lumpers, ship-dockers, farriers, tail- 
ors, and the boot trade reported a 
sharp decline in the volume of em- 
ployment. 

The .'Xustr.-ilian Sugar Journal puts 
it this way: "The sugar growers will 
continue to employ white labor so 
long as it is made possible to do so 
by an adequate protection against su- 
gar produced by cheap colored labor 
of Java and other countries." 

In consequence of the expected dim- 
inution in the production of tobacco in 
Germany, the Finance bill, introduced 
in the Reichstag, provides a sum of 
£200.000 for distribution among to- 
bacco workers, who may lose their 
employment as a result of the new 
taxes. 

During the past Qve years, men em- 
ployes in the boot, trade in Victoria 
have decreased from 2136 to 2049, 
while boys have increased from 1185 
to 1337. The machine age that we 
are in dismisses the father and em- 
ploys his child for the sake of cheap 
labor. 

Giving evidence recently before the 
Half-Holiday Cotnmission, an e.x- 
president of the Sydney (Australia) 
Labor Council declared that a Satur- 
day half-holiday would not affect 
church attendances, because the 
Church was unsympathetic to the 
workers. 

In Melbourne, Australia, the print- 
ers' wages board has reduced the rate 
of pay to linotype operators, and the 
Brisbane Courier, which has linotype 
operators of its own, calls it "a sig- 
nificant award." The significance lies 
in the Courier's remark, says the 
Brisbane Worker. 

Mr. Churchill (President of the 
Board of Trade of Great Britain), 
speaking at Branxholme, Oxfordshire, 
recently, said that before the present 
Parliament ends — unless it is violently 
broken by a foul blow — an extensive 
measure of insurance against unem- 
ployment would be passed. 

The West .Australian Government 
recently made an effort to employ 
prison labor at the old lunatic asylum 
building at Fremantle. which is being 
converted into an old women's home. 
But the unionists entered such a vig- 
orous protest against being forced to 
work alongside criminals that the lat- 
ter were called off the job. 

The Sydney Labor Council has cir- 
cularized affiliated unionists to the fol- 
lowing effect: "This council com- 
mends the attitude of the Shop As- 
sistants and Warehouse Employes' 
Federation of .■\ustralia in issuing a 
badge to its financial meinbers, and 
for the purpose of practical support 
members of affiliated unions are re- 
quested to demand on all occasions 
that they be served by an assistant 
wearing the union badge." 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu 
factured for Seamen. 



LIPPM AN 

532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next 
SAN PEDRO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 

Union Goods for Union 


BROS. 

to Fritz & Ernest 

OUTFITTERS 

Men 



piBusiEU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 




S 




SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco, and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We liuy dirert from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to Inspect our 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
No\N Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 60 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stifl, sec to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loos^i labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
V1ARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



J/ST 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



WALKOVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 



LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



JACOB OLSE-N san pedro news co. 



Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C L. MUNSON 

Dealer In 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




Named shoes are frequently made In Non- 
Union factories. 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what Its name, unless It bears a 
plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP are 
always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for ;)bsence of 
the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin. Pres. Chas. L. Baine. Sec.-Treas. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Andersen, -lu."jo. Lofmaii, K. 

Andersen, Peter F. Leiitonen, .John 

Alander, K. Lund, li. K. 

Ahliois, Arne l.ano. Emll 

Albertsen. Johannes Lercli, Paul 

-Viulersen, Kinar Maguire, Tliomas 

Anueisson, Axel McKenzie, James 

Amnel, Ailjert Murie, Martin 

Huclitman. F. Mellin. Edward 

Rent-sen. Axel il.vgind. \\ . F. 

Brose, R. iMesak. ICdward 

Belli ens, K. A. Neulinfe', .Mbert 

Boylan, Curls. J. Nielsen, Svend 

Bietila, Th. -133S Nordman, John D. 

Bower, Gosta Osses. A. 

Brogard, Nils Ulsen, Tli. 

Comstedt, Ernst Olsen, O. -537 

Carlsson, C. Odnian. Ous 
Cliristianspn, HaroldOtto, John 
Cliri.stiansen, G.-1054Oseses, W. A. 

DahlbeiK. J- H. Petersen, S. R. 

Ecklian.lt, W. Peterson. K. E., -90:! 

Engljerg. Oscar I'etersen, If. -1064 

Ek, Thuie Peterson, Laurltz 

Erickson, Jolin Pedersen, Gert C. 

Fay, Joe I'edersen, Alfred 
Frederiiksen. Harry Pederson, Reinhold 

Fisher. -5.iii Peterson, Hans 

Folvik, Carl Rudland, Jakob 

Flemiiife", John Reed. L. C. 

FasiK, Don Rasmussen, E. 

Gabrielsen. K. -601 Scott. E. G. (pkg.) 

Gask. A. .Schwitzer, H. 

Gorsesen, Emil San, B. -2113 

Glauseti, Harry Searabosia, M. 

Cuentlier. Rlcliard SemberK, J. 

HcKguni. Louis Sorensen, A. 
Hcrmanson, K. -l.'iolSteen. J'. C. 

Haiifen. 'Iheodor Solie, Ingvald 

I Hike. Carl Svenssen, Nikola ns 

Hesse, Erick t-indahl, J. 

Hagseniiiuller, H. Syversen, Olc 

Hansen, Peter K. Staisten, Karl 

Haaiklau, I. Sandstrom, J. -1347 

Hansen, Carl Stiahle. Charles 
lleinanen, C. (pkg.)Southerland, A. 

Johansen, C. -1191 Svendsen, C. -1050 

Johanson, J. -880 Swanson, Charles 

Joigensen, E. Tommis, Frank 

Kiiliiie. W. Tufvesson, J. 

Koch. Car! Trepetket. Frank 

Keinanen. Emll 'I'ouanne, Walter 

Klappe. J. Veyvoda. Frank 

Kristiansen. EisU tjuinn. W. 

KiaushatK. F. ■\Vahrenheit. Otto 

Kari, M.itti U..'cligel, J. 

Krohn, J. A. Wahlstedt. R. -778 

Larson. L. Westerhiiul, T. P'. 
Louis, Mickel 



S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manyfacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



BOSS3OM) 



OVERALLS 

Neustadter Bros. 

iAN FRANCISCO NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



INFORMATION WANTED. j,,^^, g^^^p,^^ ,„,^ ,^^^^^^ „f „„ ^.^jp 

Samuel England, age 48 years, com- Santa Rita in April, 1909, is in(|uired 
municate with Seamen's Institute, 242 j for by Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart 
Steuart street, San Francisco. street. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Camille Moortgat, who arrived at 
San Francisco in September last, is 
inquired for by the Belgian Consulate 
at San Francisco. 

Donald Corsie, sailor, aged about 
55, left the Great Lakes in 1885 for 
the West Coast and probably Aus- 
tralia, is inquired for by his brother. 
.\ddress Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Wm. McLaughlin, Julius Franz, K. 
Grunert, J. Koglund, W. Wickstrom 
and C. Christensen, who were mem- 
bers of the crew of the schooner Min- 
nie E. Caine at the time of her wreck, 
are inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



->- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Tlic entire Canadian assets of the New England 
Fish Company, vahied at $2,000,000, were trans- 
ferred on October 5 to the Canadian Fish Com- 
pany of Vanconver, B'. C. 

Last of the season's codfishing fleet and the only 
American vessel to cruise this year in the Okhotsk 
Sea, the barkentine Fremont, Captain Schmidt, ar- 
rived at San Francisco on October 3. She brought 
80,000 codfish to the Union F'ish Company. 

Completing a tow of 130 hours from Bandon 
the Redstack tug Hercules, Captain Dan Thom- 
sen, arrived at San Francisco on October 3. bring- 
ing in the waterlogged steam-schooner Bandon, 
which stranded at Coquille River on August 31. 

I'^or his carelessness in allowing a passenger to 
smuggle $1500 worth of Panama hats, W. Z. 
Ziegenmeier, master of the steamer Erna, was 
fined $1000 by Judge Welborn in the United 
States District Court at Los Angeles October 7. 

A message received at San Francisco on Octo- 
ber 6 from the steamer Mariposa reported the loss 
of the Norwegian steamer Ocean Queen, Captain 
Johansen, which went on a reef between Tahiti 
and Makatea on September 16 and sank the same 
day. No lives were lost. 

A decision was rendered by United States Judge 
Overfield on October 7 confiscating the Japanese 
sealing schooner Kinzai Maru for violating the 
sealing regulations and hunting in closed waters. 
The decree orders that the vessel be sold by the 
United States Marshal of Unalaska. 

The wireless telegraph station at Honolulu was 
in free communication on October 8 with that at 
Cape Blanco, Or., the westernmost point of the 
State. Several long messages were received. The 
station at Cape Blanco is operated by the Govern- 
ment. 

The steamer Humboldt arrived at Seattle on 
October 5 from .\laska with thirty-live Japanese 
seal poachers who have just finished terms of im- 
prisonment at Sitka and who are still prisoners, 
charged with being unlawfully in the United 
States. They will be deported to Japan. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 7: Steamer Zinfandcl, George D. Larsen, 
vice George H. Pinkham; steamer Nonpareil, J. 
G. Swan, vice Peter Baum; schooner Florence 
Caduc, Christian Jespersen, vice Andrew Olscn. 

■\ wireless plant larger than any that have been 
installed in any of the stations of the United 
Wireless Company on the Pacific is to be in- 
stalled on the Pacific Mail liner Korea during this 
week, and will be in readiness for operation be- 
fore the liner leaves on her next trip to the 
Orient. 

Fifteen Japanese seamen on the British bark 
Howard D. Troop, which is loading grain at Port- 
land, went on a strike on October. 7 and for a 
time a mutiny seemed imminent. Their alleged 
grievance was improper feeding. The Japanese 
Consul. Y. Numano, was called in as arbitrator 
and settled the difficulty. 

Completing an exceptionally smart passage of 
fifty-six days from Newcastle, Australia, the 
schooner David Evans, Captain Seel, arrived at 
San Francisco on October 4 with 1233 tons of 
coal consigned to Hind, Rolph & Co. Captain 
Seel reported excellent weather on his fast trip 
across the Pacific. 

The last of the big steamships of the Coast, the 
Admiral Sampson of the Alaska-Pacific line, has 
joined in the rate war by meeting the rr.tes on the 
other big steamers of $5.35 first class and $3.35 
steerage to San Francisco. The Alaska-Pacific 
Company also put in a rate of $25.35 first class to 
Seattle and $15.35 steerage. 

Tlie schooner Charles R. Falk, vvhich is lying 
on the nortli beach of Gray's Flarbor, is now 
stripped of everything of value, eight tons of 
anchor chains having been taken froin her. The 
first stif? blow will see the masts overboard and 
the hull has become the home of crabs and other 
small denizens of the sea. High tides cover the 
hulk and the sands are slowly burying it. 

Effective after the sailing of the Virginian on 
October 29th. the American-Hawaiian Steamship 
Company has declared advances on east-bound 
rates affecting several commodities, particularly 
dried fruits and canned fruits and vegetables. The 
only explanation offered by traffic officers of the 
company is that the demand for space is such 
that premium rates must be charged for service. 

Details were brought by the steamer Aorangi. 
whicli arrived at Victoria, B, C, on September 22 
from .\ustralia, of the capsizing of the American 
missionary yacht Hiram Bingham at Jaluit in the 
Marshall group, the death of Rev. T. Walkup from 
exposure and the terrible experiences of the casta- 
ways, who were three weeks in an open boat with- 
out food. The survivors were rescued by the 
.•iteamer Germania and landed at Sydney on 
August 26. 

At the Bendi»sen shipyard at Eureka on Scp- 
tettiber 29 the steam-schooner Klamath was 
launched. The Klamath is owned by the Charles 
R. McCormack Company of San Francisco, and 
is the largest wooden steam-schooner ever built 
on the Pacific Coast. Her official dimensions are: 



Length, 207.5 feet; beam, 41.6 feet; depth of hold, 
15.4 feet; net tonnage as launched, 992. Her 
length over all is 217 feet. She will carry 
1,200,000 feet of lum.ber. 

Considerable inconvenience has been experi- 
enced by the United States Shipping Commis- 
sioner at Tacoma during the past few weeks by 
a number of cases in which an attempt has been 
made to garnishee or attach the wages of sea- 
men. Regarding such efforts, a decision has just 
been received by the Shipping Commissioner 
which bears on this subject particularly, and 
which shows that seamen's wages can not be 
garnisheed under any circumstances. 

Slashing $7.50 from the Los Angeles first-class 
rate on its crack new steamers. Governor and 
President, the Pacific Coast Steamship Company 
on September 30 began war in earnest on Schu- 
bach & Hamilton, the Seattle shipping firm, 
which is operating the independent steamship St. 
Croix between San Francisco and the southern 
city. The rates on the Governor and President 
are now $5 first class and $3 second class. The 
rates on the steamers Santa Rosa and City of 
Topeka are $3 and $2, respectively. 

Almost the last salmon packets of the season to 
return from the northern canneries, the ship Santa 
Clara and the ship Star of Russia of the Alaska 
Packers' fleet, arrived at San Francisco on 
October 3. The Star of Russia made a fast run 
of ten days from Karluk, bringing 25,000 cases of 
canned salmon. The Santa Clara brought 30,200 
cases of canned salmon. The ships Star of Eng- 
land and Star of Scotland and a few tenders are 
now the only cannery vessels still on the way. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 2. Steamer Richmond, John Nelson vice 
H. A. Simpson; steamer Yosemite, Charles Reiner 
vice Edward Johnson; schooner Meta, Alfred 
Larsen vice August Anderson; steamer Wink, J. 
T. McGinnes vice J. W. Cleghorn; steamer Cap- 
tain Weber, George H. Goodell vice N. P. Nelson; 
steamer Car Float, No. 2, Charles Hansen vice 
J. J. Fahrenholtz. The steamer Bee, Aksel Soren- 
son, master, was registered. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 8: Steamer G. B. Marshall, G. B. Mar- 
shall, vice A. S. Sigelhoff; steamer Modoc, B. 
N. Ridcout, vice Enos Fauratt, Jr.; steamer 
Crossley No. 11, Mark Armstrong, vice William 
Figari; steamer Bowdoin, Andrew Anderson, vice 
Olof Johnson; steamer Sentinel, John L. Al- 
bridge, vice M. A. Armstrong; barkentine S. G. 
Wilder, P. A. Hanson, vice Charles Jackson. The 
steamer Santa Rita, L. A. Ficlden master, and the 
schooner Caroline Dixon, William Jensen master, 
were enrolled. 

Before the United States Inspectors at Seattle 
the International Steamship Company, operating 
the steamer Whatcom, was charged with violating 
the Navigation laws by having only one licensed 
mate instead of two, as required by the certificate 
issued by the Inspectors. The rharges were 
brought by the local harbor master of the Ameri- 
can'Association of Masters, Mates and Pilots. The 
steamers ply around the Sound, and the company 
claims to have specific permission from the In- 
spectors to carry only one. licensed man besides 
the captain. On their short runs the second mate 
looks after the cargo and has nothing to do with 
the running of the ship. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 6: Steamer National. J. A. Rookes vice 
James Fenton; schooner Amelia, Ernest Lindnall 
vice A. M. Treahy; schooner Louise, Hans Hansen 
vice Conrad Cheller; schooner Natalie, C. S. 
Christcnsen vice Christian Jesperson; steamer 
Grace Barton, J. F. Chlemens vice E. A. Hiatt; 
steamer J. Marhoffer, J. E. Johnson vice George 
Winkel; schooner Ada McCune, E. R. Schmidt 
vice Oliver Ortley; steamer Fair Oaks, Gustav 
Johnson vice Alfred Hanson. The schooner 
Martha was reported from Unalaska with August 
Linquist as master vice Charles W. Prelberg. The 
following vessels were enrolled: Bark Olympic, 
T. H. Evans master, and steamer Marshfield, G. 
Dettmers master. 



To Mariners: You will please take notice that 
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 
has installed and is maintaining Ijetween San 
Pedro and Terminal Island, one (1) subaqueous 
telephone and telegraph cable, 750 feet in length. 
That at said points said company will rnaintain 
monuinents indicating the place where said cable 
lies. Do not drop anchor at these points. San 
Pedro, Cal, December, 1907. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 120:? Merchants' 
F.xchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
li/^A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass., IVzA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORIC. N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE), Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 50 Union St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
B.\LTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La.. 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 

BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. III., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 213 Banks Ave. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 305 French St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR. O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111.. 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 63 East Kinzie St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO. Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Eraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wi.s.. ?.'n Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To in.sure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco PostofBce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the express.ions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 13. 1909. 



STATE LAP.OR CONVENTION. 



The tenth annual convention of the Cahfor- 
nia State I-ederation of Labor met at San 
Rafael. October 4-8. About 100 delegates 
were in attendance. The Sailor.s' Union of 
the Pacific was represented by Comrades Bur- 
ge.son, Erickson, Liddy, Scharrenberg, Sea- 
man and Thomal. Among the measures acted 
upon was one favoring Asiatic Exclusion and 
calling for concerted action by the labor move- 
ment of the State in support of the Asiatic 
Exclusion League. ( )ther resolutions were 
adopted favoring the establishment of Postal 
Savings banks. Woman Suffrage, urging an 
increa.sed demand for the union label, favor- 
ing an amendment to the Child Labor law, 
calling for an increase in the number of State 
l-'actory lnsi)ectors, and indorsing the Farm- 
ers' L'nion and its label. A resolution was 
adopted favoring the organizing of migratory 
labor. 

The convention exjiressed its disapproval of 
the action of Governor Gillett in vetoing the 
Seamen's bill, passed by the last Legislature. 
The resolution on this subject, introduced by 
the representatives of the Sailors' Union, is as 
follows : 

Whereas. Senate Hill No. 232 fotherwise known 

as tlie Seamen's bill) to amend Section 644 of 

_jtlie Penal Code relating to "enticing seamen to 

desert" was vetoed by Governor Gillett for the 

second time; and 

Whereas, Said bill was indorsed by the last 
convention of the California State Federation of 
Labor and it.s passage aided by the legislative 
representative oi this body; and 

Whereas. The enactment of said bill into law 
is necessary to secure to .American seamen in the 
ports of this State the right of personal free- 
dom equal with that enjoyed by all other classes 
of citizens, a right already recognized and grant- 
ed by the Federal maritime law; therefore be it 

Resolved, Hy the tenth annual convention of 
the California State I'ederation, this 5th day of 
October, 1909, that we emphatically disapprove 
the action of Governor Gillett in vetoing the 
Seamen's bill as without warrant either in jus- 
tice to the seamen or in the conditions of the 
maritime industry, and as perpetuating a dis- 
crimination against one branch of labor and 
therefore constituting a menace to the freedoin 
of all branches of labor, and pronounce the rea- 
sons given in the Governor's veto message to be 
based upon a misconception of facts and an 
unjustifiable reflection upon the motives and 
methods of the organized seamen; further 

Resolved, That we hereby reindorsc the Sea- 



men's proposals, as set forth in Senate Bill No. 
232, and pledge ourselves to aid in the passage of 
said bill by the forthcoming Legislature of Cali- 
fornia; further 

Resolved, That the accompanying copy of Gov- 
ernor Gillett's veto message and analysis thereof 
be included in the records of this convention. 

On the subject of Ship Subsidies, the fol- 
lowing resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, Railroad corporations either have ac- 
<|uired or are acquiring ownership or control 
over steamship lines running in competition with 
them along the coasts and on the rivers; and 

\\'hereas. Such action is always followed by 
permitting such lines to deteriorate as carriers 
of either passengers or freight; and 

Whereas, Practically all steamship lines run- 
ning from our ports to foreign countries, whether 
under our flag or not, are running under arrange- 
ments with the railroads and would find it so 
dililicult to run without such arrangements that 
they go under control of such roads and become 
but an extension of such roads across the water; 
and 

Whereas, Agitation for ship subsidy comes 
with the most force and persistance from these 
steamship lines; and 

Whereas, Subsidized foreign-going vessels 
could carry passengers and freight between coast 
ports, treating them as way ports to and from 
foreign terminals, thus giving to the railroads still 
more powerful means of preventing the building 
and maintaining independent lines in the coast- 
wise trade; and 

Whereas, Subsidy might furnish a few more 
vessels in the foreign trade, and this is doubt- 
ful, it would still further decrease our merchant 
marine as a whole and place the ocean trade 
under railroad monopoly; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the California State Federation of 
Labor in convention assembled, that we protest 
against any subsidy beyond the mail subsidy now 
paid being granted; and further 

Resolved, That we hereby request Congress to 
cause an investigation into the International 
Shipping Federation, its membership and meth- 
ods, with a view of ascertaining what are its re- 
lations to our shipowners, if any. 

On the subject of Government by Injunction 
the convention declared itself as follows: 

Whereas, Government by Injunction is govern- 
ment by discretion, therefore despotic, and the 
very antithesis of government by law; and 

\\lu'reas. The struggle between despotic gov- 
ernment and government by law was fought out 
in England, to the great advantage of the Eng- 
lish people and of human freedom generally, and 
was settled in favor of government by law, and 
in narrowing down equity jurisdiction to the pro- 
tection of property until its title could be legally 
deterniinetl, to the protection of minors and those 
of unsound mind; and 

Whereas, This jurisdiction rigidly excludes 
from the power of the equity courts all personal 
relations and all relations between employers and 
employes; and 

Whereas, Any encroachment by equity juris- 
diction upon jurisdiction of the courts of law is a 
return to despotic government, and a departure 
from gDvernment by the people; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the California State Federation 
of Labor, in convention assembled, that we pro- 
test against this usurpation; and further 

Resolved, That we consider it the duty of of- 
ficials of organizations of labor to bring this 
usurpation to the attention of the .\merican peo- 
ple by ignoring such injunctions, holding them- 
selves ready to take such consequences as may 
befall, to the end that the law may be vindicated, 
popular government protected, and that the peo- 
ple may insist upon the proper remedy. 

( )fificcrs were elected as follows : President, 
D. D. Sullivan; Vice-Presidents, First District, 
Chris. Ploeger ; Second District, Tom C. Sea- 
ward : Third District, M. T. Murray ; Fourth 
District, R. VViand; Fifth District, Thomas 
Wright: Sixth District, Harry Menke, D. J. 
Murray and T. K. Thompson ; Seventh Dis- 
trict, L. P>. Leavitt ; Eighth District, John W. 
Ericksen ; Secretary-Treasurer, Paul Schar- 
renberg. Los Angeles was chosen as the con- 
vention citv for 1910. 



WOMEX AGAIXST EXCLUSION. 



The Journal has received, through Mr. S. 
H. Guinnane, chief-steward of the steamer 
Rose City, the sum of $5.80 for the assistance 
of the Swedish strikers. The money was col- 
lected among the second-cabin passengers on 
that ves.sel during a recent trip. Mr. Joseph 
Wiesner writes that the passengers met and 
discussed the situation in Sweden, with the 
result that a collection was taken up and the 
before-mentioned sum realized. 



The second biennial convention of the Na- 
tional Women's Trade-Union League opened 
in Chicago on September 27 and closed on 
October 1. A number of measures of special 
interest to women workers were adopted, 
among these being a resolution urging the Na- 
tional Woman Suffrage Association to co- 
operate with the \Vomen's Trade-Union 
League in furthering organization of women's 
trade-unions, and in forwarding legislation for 
the protection of the health and safety of 
women workers. Another resolution urged 
the American Federation of Labor to "take 
action t(nvard the formation of a Labor party, 
which party shall be pledged to the single pur- 
pose of forwarding the higher interests of the 
toiling millions as against the selfish interests 
of a privileged minority, and which shall wel- 
come to its membership all persons of what- 
ever other affiliations who shall subscribe to 
the above line of action." 

As an offset to this rather large and liberal 
programme, the convention defeated a resolu- 
tion calling for Asiatic exclusion, upon the 
ground that "economic wrongs could not be 
righted by such superficial measures as ex- 
clusion, and that human brotherhood may not 
be denied." These views are as familiar as 
they are fallacious. In effect, they amount to 
saying that the "economic wrong" of Asiatic 
immigration must be permitted to go un- 
touched pending the re-adjustment of the. en- 
tire economic scheme, and that the facts of 
race antagonism must not be i^ermitted to mar 
the beauty of the "human brotherhood" idea. 
It is interesting to reflect upon the certainties 
as to the character of population in the West 
in the year 1909 had the views expressed b\- 
the Women's Trade-Union League prevailed 
in that section in the year 1850, or at any sub- 
sequent period. For an illustration on this 
point we need only look at the character of 
the present population in the Hawaiian Is- 
lands, A look in that direction develops the 
fact tiiat the original proponents of the 
"human-brotherhood" idea are now the most 
strenuous protestants against the said idea. 

The Women's Trade-LTnion League has 
placed itself squarely in opposition to the labor 
movement of the country in this matter, and 
squarely in line with the cheap-labor elements 
of the West and other sections. Probably the 
action of the League will affect no one but 
itself. It would seem that in matters of this 
kind these co-workers of ours might very well 
accept the judgment of the "men folks," if 
only to assure themselves that the latter will 
accept their (the women's) judgment in thost 
matters concerning which the latter may justly 
claim to be best informed. On the contrary, 
it is evident that the National Women'- 
Trade-Union League, so far from being con- 
tent to act as an auxiliary of the labor move- 
ment, is bent upon forming a labor movement 
of its own, and even of formulating new and 
comprehensive policies for its predecessor in 
the field. The women workers of the country 
may cc^iigratulate themselves upon the fact 
that the labor movement may be depended 
upon to exert itself in their behalf without 
increasing the danger of strangulation due to 
a miscalculation of its powers of ma.stication. 



The talk of "liberal administration in a 
seaport" still resounds from the stump in San 
Franci.sco. Seamen and other interested per- 
sons are thus informed that if they wish a 
"liberal administration" for those who would 
rob them, they know who to vote for. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



J^iiblic opinion changed to the side of the Ship 
Subsidy as soon as it was demonstrated to the 
conviction of the most confirmed landsmen of 
the interior that without subsidies we can have 
no deep-sea merchant marine. Americans are 
smart, but they are not smart enough to pay SO 
per cent more for ships than their competitors 
pay, run them at double the cost of running for- 
eign ships, and still make a profit in competition 
with cheap ships run by cheap crews and enjoy- 
ing substantial subsidies besides. Nobody could 
do it, but it required the demonstration of the 
cessation of building for the deep-sea trade, and 
the ships already built rotting away idle in our 
ports, to convince a majority of our countrj'men. 
When at last they were convinced that there 
nnist be subsidies or no American merchant ma- 
rine, American pride and patriotism revolted at 
the idea that the great Republic should go with- 
out anything desirable on the ground that we can 
not afford it. And American common sense re- 
volted at the notion of building up a costly Amer- 
ican Navy which would be useless for distant serv- 
ice in time of war for lack of colliers and other 
au.xiliary services. And so we are at last to get 
our Ship Subsidies. — San Francisco Chronicle. 

Our contemporary will now go to sleep in 
bli,s,sful a.sstirance that "we are at last to get 
our Ship Subsidies." Later on the Chronicle 
will awaken to the realization that Ship Sub- 
sidies are not to be got by merely fabricating 
a case in favor of such measures. If the 
Chronicle should be compelled to wait for 
Ship Subsidies until it has succeeded in prov- 
ing the .statements it makes, the whole world 
might go to sleep until the crack of doom. 



In accordance with annual custom, the 
Journal presents in this issue a summary of 
the proceedings of the British Trade-Union 
Congress. The proceedings of that body are 
of special interest to the American labor move- 
ment by reason of the close relationship exist- 
ing between it and the American Federation 
of Labor, which relationship was accentuated 
by the presence of President Samuel Gompers 
at the recent Congress. It will be noted that 
the perennial resolution on compulsory arbi- 
tration met the usual fate — defeat by an over- 
whelming majority. Another feature of special 
interest in the proceedings of the Congress is 
the indorsement of the Tailors and Tailor- 
esses' label. In Great Britain, as in the United 
States, the workers in the garment-making 
industry are enthusiastic advocates of the 
union label. That device is slowly but surely 
forcing recognition by sheer merit, and will 
shortly occupy its rightful place as the most 
effective weapon in the battle for labor's 
rights. 



Latest advices from Sweden show that the 
great strike is still on, all attempts at arbitra- 
tion having failed. It is estimated that over 
235,000 persons are out. Financial assistance 
is urgently needed, and the labor movement 
of the Lmited States is requested to assist as 
generously and promptly as possible. Many 
contributions have already been made, but 
more — much more — is still required to prevent 
the collapse of the strike through sheer star- 
vation. All contributions should be sent to 
"Landssekretariatet, Stockholm, Sweden." 



If you aire really and truly opposed to Asi- 
atic, tenement-house and sweatshop labor you 
will demand the union label when purchasing 
cigars, tobaccos and all articles of clothing. 
The union label is the only guarantee of fair 
labor and fair conditions of employment. 



]^emand the union stamp of the Boot and 
Shoe Workers when purchasing footgear. 
See fac-simile of the stamp on page 4. 



PRECIOUS STONES OF INDIA. 



The precious and semiprecious stones 
mined in India are the diamond, ruby, sap- 
phire, spinel, tourmaline, garnet, rock crys- 
tal, and various chalcedonic forms of silica, 
jadeite, and amber. The ruby and jadeite 
are the only stones produced in India of 
considerable value. Large quantities of tur- 
quoise come from Sikkim and Tibet, that* 
from the latter country being harder and of 
darker blue, which gives it greater value. 

The importation of precious stones into 
India amounts to about $4,940,000 annually. 
The diamond industry is very limited, and 
is carried on in Southern India, the north- 
ern part of the Indian Peninsula, and in the 
Central Provinces. 

Ruby mining is carried on in Upper Bur- 
ma, and next to petroleum is the most prof- 
itable of the mineral resources of the State, 
the value of the product being about $500,- 
000 annually. One ruby of Tl carats, taken 
out a few years ago, was valued at $133,330. 

Sapphires used to be mined in Kashmir, 
but the mines are now said to be exhausted. 
The yellow, wlrite, blue, and green varie- 
ties of sapphire are found in the ruby-bear- 
ing gravels in Burma. The spinel is found 
in considerable quantities in Burma. Beryls, 
found to some extent, are generally so fis- 
sured as to be of little value. Tourmaline 
(rubellite) stones of blue, green, and black 
coloring are found in Upper Burma. Gar- 
nets are mined in Kishangarh, Jaipur State. 
Rock crystal, cut for cheap jewelry, known 
as vallam diamonds, is found in Tanjore, 
Madras Presidency; but another quartz 
crystal found in Kalabagh is cheaper, and 
is used for making necklaces. 

Chalcedonic silica, known in India as 
hakik, and embracing many forms of agate, 
is mined in the Deccan. Agates and carnel- 
ians are cut and prepared for market at 
Cambay, Bombay Presidency. The agates 
come mostly from the State of Rajpipla. 
Large quantities are shipped to Europe and 
to China. 

Jadeite of beautiful green veins is found 
in Upper Burma, and an inferijor jadeite is 
also found in other parts of India. This 
stone sells for $50 to $100 per cwt. In cut- 
ting there is considerable waste, yet the 
profit is satisfactory. 



The official report of the administration 
of prisons in Bengal shows an increase in 
the number of prisoners from 78,891 in 
1907 to 101,000 in 1908. The daily average 
of prisoners rose from 15,275 in 1907 to 
16,853 in 1908. The death rate in 1907 was 
17.5 per 1,000, but rose to 30.9 per 1,000 
in 1908. Tuberculosis was the prevailing 
disease. 



Nearly twice as many persons travel ver- 
tically by elevator every day in New York 
as horizontally by elevated, surface or sub- 
way car. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The salvage claim originating through the 
SS. Curacao and SS. Australian has been adjusted. 
All money due the crew who were aboard the 
vessel at the time the Australian was assisted will 
be found in the manager's office, 112 Market 
street. Parties applying for such money will first 
apply to the head of their respective department 
for identification. The names of the men are as 
follows: F. Mason, A. Mondini, R. Nelson, J. 
Jonasen, J. Lorenz. C. Swcnscn, H. Nelson, F. 
Rebases, C. Chidley. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, October 11, 1909. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7:30 p. m., Chas. Taucer presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping medium. The sum of $10 per 
month for six months was donated for the pur- 
pose of organizing the migratory workers of the 
State. 

NOTICE: The election of delegates to the 
New York Convention of the I. S. U. of A, will 
take place in the ne.xt two meetings held at Head- 
quarters and Branches. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St., Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 4, 1909. 
General situation fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 4, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium. 
H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 4, 1909, 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 4, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
prospects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 4, 1909. 
Siiipping medium. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 62. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Oct. 4, 1909. 
Shipping good. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 2, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
prospects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 4, 1909. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 27, 1909. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 7, 1909. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slow. The nomination of dele- 
gates to the next convention of the I. S. U. of A. 
will take place at the next regular meeting at 
Headquarters and the Branches. The report of 
the Quarterly Finance Committee, finding books, 
cash on hand arid in banks correct, was read and 
adopted. Officers were nominated for the en- 
suing term. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 30, 1909. 
Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 2, 1909. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; prospects uncer- 
tain; plenty of men ashore. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Oct. 5, 1909. 
Strike situation very good. 

ALEX. McKECHNIE, Acting Secretary. 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 5, 1909. 
Shipping fairly good. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
li/,A Lewis St. 

DIED. 

Patrick McClurc, No. 713, a native of Ireland, 
aged 34, died at San Franciscf), Cal., October. 
1909. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



♦^^^ 



OIV THE OREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lalce Seamen's Unions.) 



THE FIGHT WILL GO ON. 



To-day (September 30) the strike of the 
seamen of the Great Lakes is \53 days old, 
and the seamen are just as confident, just as 
determined, just as eager for the battle as 
they were five months ago, when they decid- 
ed to fight, now and for all time to come, 
against the Lake Carriers' Association's im- 
ported "Hellfare" scheme. 

The eyes of organized labor all over the 
world are upon us. Even the Lake Carriers' 
Association itself is surprised and confound- 
ed ; surprised because it thought it was go- 
ing to have easy sailing in disrupting the sea- 
men ; confounded because it went hard on the 
rocks instead. I am proud to be a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, proud to be in 
this fight in any capacity. We are fighting a 
clean fight. The Lake Carriers' Associa- 
tion can not whip us. This is a bald state- 
ment of facts. We will keep right on with 
this fight against scab shipping-masters, 
"Farewell" books, police guards, stockade 
fences. Just as long as we live there will 
be no compromise, no faltering. We will 
win because we are strong enough and 
brave enough to fight until we do win. 

Some few spineless traitors there were 
among us, men who said, "What am I go- 
ing to do?" men who have such a low or- 
der of intelligence that they think that tlic 
Lake Carriers' vessels are tlic only ones on 
these waters, and that the only jobs to be 
had on earth are on the Lakes. These have 
deserted their comrades on the firing line, 
sneaked away under fire; sold their brother 
into slavery, so far as their puny eflforts 
could accomplish that treachery. Thank 
God, there are not many of these. 

We will win our fight. We will win it 
cleanly, and with clean hands, and we will 
be better men for having fought, better 
men and better union men ; betfcr morally, 
and have clearer, better understandings and 
love and trust for our comrades. In this 
connection we must not overlook or forget 
our cf)mrades on both Coasts, the comrades 
who have cheerfully proven that they arc 
comrades in deed as well as in name, com- 
rades who have put their hands in their pock- 
ets and said, "Here is the real proof of 
friendship and love — money — thousands, ten 
thousand, fifty thousand dollars, and more 
if you need it." To them we give our 
thanks and our gratitude. We will not for- 
get. Again we are better men for it. 

To our own members, our comrades, who, 
finding themselves in a position to obtain 
employment at other work, have relieved 
the strain on the treasury, to them also we 
give our thanks. To our comrades tried and 
true who, while sailing on fair vessels, have 
given so cheerfully to the cau.se, we also 
give thanks. The fight will go on to the 
end, and that end, will be victorv. 

W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



The Detroit owners of the steamer Nor- 
walk have appealed from the decision of the 
Montreal admiralty court, holding their boat 
at fault for the collision which sank a barge 
in the St. Lawrence River in 1907 with the 
loss of two lives. The case has been taken 
to the Ottawa court. 




A DISASTROUS SEASON. 



This has been a disastrous season for the 
underwriters up to date, for, according to 
a record kept by one of the Cleveland men, 
eighteen ships have been sunk, five de- 
stroyed by fire and several others badly 
damaged by grounding and going ashore at 
various points along the Great Lakes. 

The boats that went to the bottom were 
the steamer Eber Ward in May in the 
Straits of Mackinaw ; in April the Aurania 
in Whitefish Bay; the tug Floss in Lake 
Erie with her master and crew; the George 
Nestor of? Baraga, Lake Superior; the Rus- 
sia in Lake Huron ; the Adella Shores, 
Whitefish Point, May 9; the W. P. Thew, 
sunk by the James E. Davidson in Lake 
Huron ; the barge John Schuette, sunk by 
the Alfred Mitchell in the rivers in July ; 
the Senator, sunk by the Norman B. Ream 
off Detour; the Cadillac, sunk by the George 
Iv. Craig, August L in the St. Clair River; 
the Collingwood. sunk in the Detroit River 
August 24 ; the John Pridgeon, Jr., sunk in 
Lake Erie September 18 ; the steamer Lack- 
awanna, sunk in collision with the Paisley 
off Point Edward, August 18; the Crescent, 
sunk by the Perry G. Walker in the Soo 
Canal ; the Glengary, sunk in Lachane Canal 
August 17; the barge Plymouth, sunk in the 
Detroit River August 21 ; the Monteagle, 
sunk in Mud Lake September 18. 

The following ships w'ere burned to the 
water's edge : Barge A. Gebhardt, in Geor- 
.gian Bay; steamer Iron Age, in June, in Lake 
Erie; steamer Tempest No. 2, in Georgian 
Bay ; City of Green Bay in Lake Michigan, 
August 19; Samoa, in Lake Linden, Septem- 
ber 21. 

The following boats that were sunk have 
been raised and are again in commission : 
Cadillac, Lackawanna, Plvmouth, Crescent 
City. 



The Lake Department of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America has had a 
very distinguished visitor during the past 
two weeks, J. Havelock Wilson, President 
National Sailors and Firemen's l^nion of 
Great Britain. Accompanied by Wm. IT. 
Frazier, of Boston, Secretary-Treasurer of 
the International Seamen's Union of .Xmer- 
ica, Genera] Secretary Olander and Pres- 
ident Stack, Mr. Wilson has just finished a 
tour of the larger ports on the Lakes, hold- 
ing open meetings and arousing the interest 
and friendship of the citizens for the seamen 
in their struggle against the Lake Carriers' 
"Welfare-Farewell" scheme. 

Scabs are getting scarce, the gales are be- 
ginning to blow, and the kids and cornfield 
sailors long for "home and mother." One 
vessel arrived in Conneaut to-day (Septem- 
ber 30) with all her crew except the officers 
seasick! W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



WILL HAVE 103 VESSELS. 



While the steamer H. B. Nye. up bound, 
was passing a drill scow near Sailors' En- 
campment recently, she struck an obstruc- 
tion thought to be a boulder thrown into the 
channel by blasting. .\ hole was punctured 
in number one tank on the port side, which 
filled with water. She came on to the Soo, 
where divers will make repairs. 



The Pittsburg Steamship Company next 
season will have eighty-one steamers and 
twenty-two barges, a total of 103 vessels. 
With the five 600-foot steamers ordered for 
next season, the company will have the larg- 
est average carrying cai)acity of any fleet on 
the Lakes. 

President Coulbj' has sold nine of the 
small carriers of the fleet this year. Seven 
of the whaleback barges were turned over 
to the Great Lakes Engineering Works of 
Detroit in part payment for the three 600- 
foot steamers ordered this month. The 
steamer W. P. Palmer was sold to the South- 
ern Steamship Company of Philadelphia and 
is now on the Atlantic Coast. The Duluth 
it Port Huron Steamship Company bought 
the steamer A. B. Wolvin some time ago. 

The company had forty-five barges when 
Mr. Coulby took charge of the fleet in 1905. 
Since then twenty-three of the whalebacks 
were sold, sixteen of them going to the .At- 
lantic Coast. 



CLOSE CALL FOR BIG BOATS. 



There was a northeaster blowing on Lake 
Huron on September 17 and some of the 
smaller craft were sheltered at Harbor Beach 
and Port Huron. The larger vcs.sels were 
not delayed. 

The steering gear of the big steamer .A. C. 
Dinkey went wrong below Detroit and she 
swung across the bow of the Eastern States, 
coming in from Buffalo. .\ collision was 
narrowly averted. The Dinkey is believed 
to have grounded lightly but afterward 
straightened up and proceeded down the 
river. 

The steamer Uranus blew her whistle 
overboard at Smith's coal dock on Septem- 
ber 16. The whistle went up some distance 
in the air and landed in the coal on the dock. 
Captain Caughell says. ' The L'^ranus stop- 
ped at the Detroit Shipbuilding Company 
for repairs and got away on the 17th. 



The rapid increase in the use of the Ca- 
nadian Canal at Sault Ste. Marie by down- 
bound traffic is strikingly shown in the sta- 
tistical report for the month of August, 
which has been compiled by the Govern- 
ment officials. Last month the traffic in ore 
reached 6,779,385 tons, of which 4,373.678 
tons were carried through the Canadian 
Canal, compared with 2,405,707 tons through 
the United States canals. Of the 2,506,621 
bushels of grain taken past Sault Ste. Marie 
in August, 1,878,016 bushels went through 
the Canadian canal. Of the total eastbound 
(downbound) freight of 7,127,910 tons for 
the month, 4,479,664 tons came down on the 
Canadian side. 



The wreck of the steamer John Pridgeon, 
Jr., was recently located fourteen miles from 
Cleveland north 63 degrees west, about one 
and a half miles south of the vessel cour-- 
to the Dummy light. Lighthouse Inspect' 
Stearns has been requested to place a light 
on the wreck, for it is a serious menace t. 
navigation in its present location withom 
lights. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ANNIVERSARY OF DISASTER. 



Fifty years ago on Saturday, September 
25, one of the worst disasters on Lake 
Michigan was experienced in the burning 
of the steamer Niagara three miles off Port 
Washington with the loss of 270 lives and 
$300,000 worth of freight. 

The terrible loss of life in the destruction 
of the vessel is still vivid in the minds of 
the older residents of the city. The late 
Captain Fred Pabst, then employed on the 
little steamer Traveler, was one of the well 
known Milwaukeeans who did heroic work 
in rescuing passengers. 

The Niagara, which was an old-fashioned 
canal propeller, was en route from Colling- 
wood to Chicago. The destruction of life 
and property that followed the outbreak of 
the fire was one of the horrors of the Lake 
and is easily recalled by many old settlers. 

The fire spread rapidly through the boat 
and in less time than it takes to tell 270 
lives were snuffed out and the boat and her 
valuable cargo destroyed. 



NEW EXCURSION STEAMER. 



The D., B. I. & W. Ferry Company is 
planning to bring out a new excursion 
steamer for the 1910 season. Plans have 
been prepared and the matter now only 
awaits the approval of the board of directors. 
It is expected that there will be no opposi- 
tion and within a month contracts will likely 
be let. 

The steamer is expected to be about the 
size of the Britannia, second largest of the 
big fleet. At the same time all the best 
points of all the boats will be incorporated. 
The plans have been prepared under the 
personal direction of President Campbell. 

Once the board of directors approve the 
building of the new boat there will be no 
delay in beginning work on her. It is not 
likely that there will be any material change 
from the plans already prepared, permitting 
work to be begun immediately. 



COLLISION AT BAR POINT. 



The steamer R. L. Ireland of the Gilchrist 
fleet, bound up without cargo, and the 
steamer Mary Elphicke of Chicago were in 
collision at Bar Point on September 22. The 
Elphicke, which was downbound, was hit 
on the side and she proceeded to Erie, where 
■^he will discharge her ore cargo. She will 
probably go to Cleveland for repairs as soon 
as she is unloaded. 

The Ireland's stern is pretty badly dam- 
aged and she stopped at the plant of the 
'^.reat Lakes Engineering Works at Ecorse. 
I'aptain W. G. Stewart, superintendent of 
ihe Gilchrist fleet, left for Detroit to look 
after the boat. No information in regard to 
liow the collision occurred was received. 



The old ferryboat LeFevre, on the San- 
dusky and Johnsons Island run during the 
summer of 1907, but since out of commis- 
sion, has been purchased by Toledo parties 
for use on the Maumee River between To- 
ledo and Perrysburg. 

The LeFevre is a steamer of the Missis- 
sippi River type and before coming to San- 
dusky was engaged in passenger traffic in 
the vicinity of Duluth. She was purchased 
by the Cedar Point Pleasure Resort Com- 
pany. 



WHALE FISHING IN FORMOSA. 



It has been found that large numbers of 
whales frequent the waters along the coast 
of Koshun, the southernmost prefecture in 
Formosa, during the winter months of Jan- 
uary, February, and March, and according- 
ly a company was formed, called the Dai 
Nippon Hogei Kaisha (Great Japan Whal- 
ing Company), to engage in whaling in 
these waters. This company was granted 
the whaling privilege along the coast by 
the Government last year, but was not able 
to commence work at that time and asked 
to have the privilege extended one year. 
This year the company has again failed to 
begin operations, and the Government has 
notified it that if it does not start in this 
winter the concession will be revoked and 
given to others. There is a good demand 
in Japan for the products of the whale. 



ANOTHER FAST DOCK. 



Announcement was made at Ashtal)ula on 
September 24, upon the authority of C. E. 
vSchaff, vice-president of the New York Cen- 
tral lines, that his compan}^ had contracted 
for ore-handling machinery for the new su- 
perior extension dock No. 2 on the Lake 
front at Ashtabula Harbor. 

The machinery and preparation of the 
dock is to cost $1,300,000, and the dock is to 
be in operation by September 1, 1910. When 
finished, dock No. 2 Avill have capacity equal 
to dock No. 1 just placed in commission car- 
rying four fifteen-ton Hullet ore unloadcrs 
with a capacity of 3,600 tons ore an hour. 

A portable bridge conveyor and power- 
house will also be erected. The dock will 
be built on artificial land made by filling in 
the Lake. 



MONTEAGLE DESTROYED. 



The steamer Monteagle was destroyed by 
fire at Sault Ste. Marie on September 21, 
and another total loss has been added to the 
list. Captain S. M. Murphy and crew of 
fourteen of the steamer arrived at the Soo 
on the 22d. 

The Monteagle, which was bound from 
Duluth to Oswego, struck a submerged crib 
in Mud Lake on the 19th and went to the 
bottom in shallow water. She was released 
on the 21st after the lighter Reliance took 
out about 27,000 bushels of wheat. The 
]\Tonteagle was owned by Robert Downey 
& Co. of Oswego, N. Y. She was built in 
1884 and was 213 feet keel and 3S feet beam. 
Her carrying capacity was 1,800 gross tons. 



SAMOA BURNED. 



Captain George A. Symes of Cleveland 
wired that city recently that the steamer Sa- 
moa, of which he had command, burned to 
the water's edge at the Oceola mills on 
Torch Lake on September 21. She was 
owned by Captain H. W. Baker, the Detroit 
wrecker. Captain Symes was on his first 
trip as her master. The Samoa left Toledo 
for Lake Linden on September 10 with coal, 
and was loaded with a cargo of copper sand 
for the return journey. The cause of the fire 
was not stated in the dispatch. The boat 
had a capacity of 1,500 tons, and she was 
valued at from $30,000 to $40,000. She was 
205 feet long by 34 feet beam, and was built 
in 1880. 



The New York divers who have been test- 
ing a new diving armor at the wreck of the 
Pewabic, in Lake Huron, have returned to 
the East. The armor is perfect, but the elec- 
tric lights must be greatly increased in in- 
tensity in order to secure efficiency at great 
depth in cold water. They have an option 
on the steamer Douglass, owned by Captain 
H. W. Baker, and may purchase her. 



W. M. Mills, a Tonawanda vesselowner, 
within the past few days sold the wooden 
steamers Harry E. Packer and John F. Eddy 
to Canadians. The Packer was built in 
1882. She is 225 feet long by 35 feet beam, 
and has a gross tonnage of 1,142. The Eddy 
was built in 1886 and is 281 feet long by 40 
feet beam. Her gross tonnage is 1,678. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frank Donnelly is inquired for by his 
mother, Mrs. Eva Donnelly, 1317 Clark St., 
Racine, Wis. 



Wm. A. Nicholson, No. 13,156, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his sister. Miss 
Alice Nicholson, 356 Lake street. Oak Park, 
111. 



Millard McLeod, No. 22582, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his mother, 
Mrs. D. A. McLeod, Box 475, Sterling, Kan- 
sas. 



Fred Smith, No. 9872, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is wanted by his mother, at Buffalo, 
N. Y. Any one knowing his address please 
communicate with W. L. Smith, 55 Main 
St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Albert Appenyella, sometimes known as 
Albert Zellers, supposed to be a seaman and 
a dredgeman, is inquired for by his sister, 
Anna Goodmiller, 806 E. Wood St., Deca- 
tur, 111. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Teleplione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MITLWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 1244 Main A\-e.. N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Plione Bell 1800. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 213 Banks Avenue 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

RAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OrinENSBURG, N. Y 70 Lsaljeila Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ERIE, Pa 305 French Street 

Telephone Bell 682. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, O 510 Meigs Street 

HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND. O. 

RELffiF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. M.irquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Sasinaw, Mich. 

Rs'.:innbn Mii-li. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay. Mich. Slieboysan. Mich. 

Houghton. Mich. Stuigeon B'ly. Wis. 

l,\iilinKtnn. Midi. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee. Mich. - Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SECRETARY FRAZIER'S LAKE TRIP. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



barbed wire around the top, so that not a 
dock or a bit of waterfront is left for any 
citizen to even go fishing from ; as a matter 
of fact, the Government has not even a dock, 
and the lighthouse, I believe, is looked after 
by the dock company. There we found two 
separate and distinct sets of police, one paid, 
and supposed to be controlled, by the city, 
and the other by the Steel Trust, the latter 
having more power than the city police, as 
they have the right to arrest any one on the 
streets or elsewhere, while the city police are 
barred from the docks. 

Ashtabula was at one time a very strong 
union town, the longshoremen and in fact 
nearly all trades were fairly well organized. 
Now not a semblance of organization is left, 
and we were told by many that while they 
would like to come to our meetings they dare 
not do so, as it would be worth their jobs 
to come. I respectfully submit that this is 
a most remarkable condition, where sup- 
posedly free American citizens are afraid to 
come to a public meeting, and judging from 
the character of those at the meeting I 
am of the opinion that their fears were well 
grounded. We had a fairly good meeting of 
city officials, police, public and private de- 
tectives from the docks, railroad officials, 
small merchants and business men. 

We endeavored to impress on the minds 
of these small merchants and business men 
the fact that following the stockade would 
come the company store and the elimination 
of the entire business of the town. We suc- 
ceeded in mingling with many of the scabs 
and listened to the .same old stories of "not 
knowing what the strike was about." and 
having no opportunity of voting on the mat- 
ter, and the strike "not being conducted on 
the right lines," "should have been called 
last year," etc.. and I might say that here 
Mr. Wilson found the first Englishman 
scabbing that he had seen during the whole 
trip, though we had come in contact with 
many of his own countrymen. 

We obtained much additional information 
as to the class of men who are in the em- 
ploy of the Lake Carriers on their vessels. 
\N'hile they have a few — very few — good 
men, most of the "men" are boys and lands- 
men, and the vessels are in a horrible condi- 
tion, especially the engines and boilers. The 
shipyards have been working overtime all 
along the Chain of Lakes. 

Later we were in Conneaut Harbor. The 
conditions in this port are very similar to 
those of Ashtabula. All the docks were en- 
closed by fences and barbed wire, etc., but 
in spite of that we held a very good meet- 
ing of the citizens. The Mayor opened the 
meeting, and welcomed the visitors. The 
citizens here were also warned against the 
stockade idea, and the conditions they may 
expect if the Lake Carriers should be suc- 
cessful in eliminating efficient men from the 
Lakes. In nearly all of these meetings Am- 
brose Bierce's article in this month's Every- 
body's Magazine was referred to, and the 
bearing that the' present fight will have on 
the manning of the Navy. 

\\'e held a meeting in Tonawanda. Though 
it was a bad night, raining and blowing, we 
had a fairly good crowd, mostly members 
of the affiliated unions. The "Shipping Fed- 
eration" was here fully explained to the 
men by Mr. Wilson, and we all had our bit 
to add. We also held a meeting in the Fire- 



men's hall in Buffalo, entirely of union men, 
the public not being admitted, where we 
had a heart-to-heart talk with the men on 
strike. We endeavored to impress on the 
minds of the men that strikes of this kind 
are not won on "booze" or by sitting around 
cursing the men who have taken their 
places, and pointing out the necessity of get- 
ting out and working during the next six 
weeks as they have never worked before. We 
also had something to say of the advantage 
of 75c dues over 50c. Mr. W'ilson and Sec- 
retary Frazier left that afternoon for Xcw 
York, where a meeting was held and the 
whole Lake situation was gone over — the 
necessity for the starting of an agitation on 
the Atlantic Coast, so that the seamen of 
the world will be made acquainted with the 
conditions on the Great Lakes and what the 
men up there are fighting for. 

To show the methods of the shipowners 
of the Lakes. I may say that we were under 
surveillance from the time that we left Buf- 
falo on the upward trip until we returned to 
r>uffalo: this was especially true while we 
were in Cleveland. 

While we were on our way from Con- 
neaut to Buffalo, Mr. Wilson got in conver- 
sation with a young man that had just made 
a trip from Duluth to Ashtabula on one of 
the Thomlinson vessels, and it would have 
been amusing to a seaman to have listened 
tohim explaining to Mr. Wilson what good 
men they had for "steersmen" and his ex- 
planation of the "little round thing they call 
a compass." He also told us that this strike 
was being conducted by a man from Chi- 
cago who was a very wealthy man, who had 
some scheme in depreciating the vessel 
l)roperty of the Lakes ! And Olander sitting 
alongside of him ! Wc met a stationary 
engineer in I'.uffalo who had been oiling on 
one scab boat, and he reported to us that the 
engines were almost completely wrecked. 
It looks to me that with heavy weather the 
shipowners will experience some very hard 
times within the next six weeks. 
Fraternally, 

Wm. H. F"razier, 
Secretary-Treasurer International Seamen's 
L'nion of America. 

r>oston. Mass. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



ATLANTIC UNION NOTES. 



The steamers building for the Coastwise 
Transportation Company will go in commis- 
sion the first of the year, one being ready in 
February and the other in March. 



Secretary W. H. Frazier has returned to 
Boston after visiting the principal Lake ports 
as Secretary-Treasurer of the International 
Seamen's Union of America, assisting in the 
disbursement of the first assessment contrib- 
uted by the affiliated unions in support of 
the Lake unions, who are on strike. 



The members of the Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union are to be congratulated on the 
manner they are responding to the call for 
the assessment to help their striking brothers 
on the Great Lakes. Very seldom indeed 
does a member demur when asked to pay. as 
they all realize it will be for their mutual 
benefit. Hope the good work will continue 
and that we may never have to say the At- 
lantic Coast Seamen's Union was delinquent 
in any respect in helping a brother when 
called on, to help down such a monstrosity 
as the "Shipping Federation." 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suflfrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all; 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms] 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby] 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as| 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking| 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov-j 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 44-4G East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 122 Alexander St.. P. O. Box J 
1365. 

TACOM.V. Wash.. 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box i 

PORT TOWNSEND, "Wash., 114 Qulncy St., P. O.l 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 62. 

PORTLAND. Or.. 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

SAN I'KKRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu St9.,l 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 140S>,^ Western Ave., P. 



O. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION! 
OF THE PACIFIC, 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart SL 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. OJ 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, "V^^^sh. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION, 

T^RO^PVR Or© 

Alaska' FISHERMEN'S union (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBITRG, Alaska. 

^ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FR.\NCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: . 

SE.\TTI^E, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. OJ 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 1 38. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journj 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEA.HENS UNION OF AUSTRALASIi 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



TO PREVENT TUBERCULOSIS. 



Ai)prupriations of over $4,000,000 for the 
Mippression of consumption have been made 
])y twenty-eight State legislatures during 
1909. It is estimated that the county and 
municipal appropriations for the same pur- 
])ose will be at least $3,000,000. These sums 
with nearly $1,000,000 from the Federal Gov- 
ernment for the support of its sanatoriums, 
makes a total of $8,000,000 granted from pub- 
lic funds for next year's fight against tuber- 
culosis. 

vSince January 1, 1909, forty-three State 
and Territorial legislatures have held ses- 
sions. Of this number, twenty-eight have 
passed laws pertaining to tuberculosis; eight 
have considered such legislation, and in only 
seven States no measures about consumption 
were presented. In all, 101 laws relating to 
tiie prevention or treatment of human tuber- 
culosis were considered and of these sixty- 
four were passed. 

Of the laws passed, fourteen were in ref- 
erence to new State institutions. State sana- 
toriums for tuberculosis will be built in 
Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Arkansas, Ore- 
gon, South Dakota, North Dakota and 
Florida. In New York, North Carolina, In- 
diana, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and 
Alainc, a])propriations have been made for 
enlarging sanatoriums, already being built 
or in operation. There arc now twenty- 
sex-en States where such institutions have 
been established. Every State east of the 
Mississippi, except Illinois, West Virginia, 
Kentucky, Tennessee and South Carolina 
have them. In Pennsylvania the State De- 
partment of Health is planning to erect a 
large hospital for advanced cases of tuber- 
culosis in addition to the State Sanatorium 
at Mount Alto. Connecticut will build three 
institutions in different parts of tlie State at 
a cost of $175,000. 

Illinois, New York, Ohio, ^Minnesota and 
Iowa passed laws giving their county officers 
power to erect sanatoriums, without resort- 
ing to a special vote. The demand for hous- 
ing tuberculosis patients near their own 
homes is inspiring these laws providing" for 
small county and municipal hospitals with- 
out the cumbersome machinery of an elec- 
tion. 

In Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New 
Jersey, Michigan, Iowa and Kansas, laws 
were passed for the strict report and regis- 
tration of tuberculosis. Only five States, in- 
cluding the District of Columbia, have such 
laws, which must be the first requisite in an 
organized movement against the disease. 
Without adequate statistics with regard to 
death and cases efforts for its suppression are 
misdirected and often wasteful. 

Laws prohibiting promiscuous spitting in 
public places, were passed in Maine, Penn- 
sylvania, New Jersey, Kansas and Connect- 
icut. Spitters in these States will be prose- 
cuted and fined. While it is a difficult mat- 
ter to enforce a State anti-spitting law, the 
Acts serve as a stimulus to local governing 
bodies to pass similar ordinances. With the 
present increase in interest in the prevention 
of tuberculosis, expectoration in cars and 
public buildings is decreasing, but the only 
way definitely to stop it is to arrest and pun- 
ish the offenders. Where this has been done, 
the nuisance has decreased very rapidly. It 
is not the dream of an optimist to suppose 
that the trolley, elevated and subway cars of 
New York could be absolutely rid of this 



source of disgust if a comprehensive crusade 
against it were started. 

Probably the most difficult appropriation 
to secure from a Legislature is one for edu- 
cation in the prevention of a disease. State 
bodies seem willing to give money for in- 
stitutions and buildings, but so incompre- 
hensible a thing as education does not appeal 
to them, as a rule. Yet, eleven States have 
this year granted nearly $100,000 for the in- 
struction of the public about tuberculosis. 
In California, Iowa, Kansas, New York, Min- 
nesota, and Rhode Island the money will be 
spent mainly on exhibits and lectures. In 
Porto Rico an appropriation of $9,000 calls 
particularly for the education of school chil- 
dren. The Philippine Islands Legislature has 
given $20,000 for general educational work. 
A conmiission to study tuberculosis and edu- 
cate the people has been appointed in Texas. 
Delaware has establislied a permanent tuber- 
culosis commission to form dispensaries and 
carry on a propaganda of enlightenment. In 
several other States, where no definite ap- 
propriations were made, some educational 
work will be done out of the regular funds 
of the health department. 

Considering the large number of measures 
enacted, it is worthy of note that few laws of 
a pernicious charactef got through. The 
Nebraska Legislature passed a measure pro- 
viding for the payment by county boards for 
the treatment of patients in institutions at 
the rate of ten dollars a week, but stipulating 
that such treatment must be by the "modern 
methods of vaccine therapy." This "modern 
method of vaccine therapy" refers to a serum 
manufactured by a Nebraska doctor. The 
law thus becomes the means of compelling 
the local physicians to use a drug which has 
little or no merit, it is alleged, in the cure of 
tuberculosis. In this manner the good 
features of the law are ])ractically nullified. 

Increased registration and increased hos- 
pital provision for advanced cases of tuber- 
culosis are urgently needed. It is hoped that 
these two features of the anti-consumption 
campaign will receive especial emphasis in 
legislatures next year. — Phil P. Jacobs, in 
The Survey. 



POLICE AND WORK DOGS. 



The breed of dogs used in Berlin, and in 
Germany generally, for police purposes is 
the so-called "German shepherd dog." The 
characteristics and qualities that make this 
breed especially valuable for this purpose 
are (1) their intelligence and teachableness, 
(2) their "good nose" and deliberateness in 
following a scent, and (3) their agility and 
strength, coupled with gentleness and an 
absence of all savage traits. For these rea- 
sons they are here considered superior to the 
bloodhounds or the Airedale, another Ger- 
man police dog. These dogs are carefully 
bred and reared, and there is an association 
of the breeders of German shepherd dogs, 
with headquarters in Munich. 

As to sources for importation. Police Ma- 
jor Klein, at the Konigliche Polizei Priisid- 
ium, Alexander-Platz, Berlin, gives the fol- 
lowing addresses from which the pure-bred 
police dogs could doubtless be procured : 
Rittmeister a. D. von Stephanitz, president. 
Association of Breeders of German Shepherd 
Dogs, Munich. IJavaria. and Th. Ilaensgen, 
Apolda, Thiiringen. The prices of these 
dogs untrained would be about $18 to $24 
and trained about $72 each. 



LABOR EXCHANGES IN EUROPE. 



In jmrsuance of its policy of social reform 
the Asquith Government now proposes to 
establish a national system of labor ex- 
clianges. By organizing the labor supply it 
hopes to reduce unemployment permanently 
in London and other industrial centers. La- 
ter, by means of insurance against unem- 
ployment through a fund jointly contributed 
by the workmen, the employer and the state, 
it plans to relieve distress and tide over peri- 
ods of stagnant industry, such as Great 
i'.ritain has sulifered from during the past 
year. 

As in the matter of ( )ld-Age pensions, the 
British are again frankly borrowing ideas 
from their neighbors on the Continent. In- 
surance against unemployment, which Mr. 
Churchill, president of the Board of Trade, 
sax-s will be dealt with at the next session 
of Parliament, has been in operation for 
years in Germany. In France out-of-work 
pay is provided by many of the trades un- 
ions on the theory, that unemployment tends 
to reduce wages, the allowance being usually 
graded downward in amount the longer the 
workman remains unemployed. 

In France, however, the Bourse de Tra- 
\ail, or labor exchange, has been a fixed in- 
stitution of the Government for almost twen- 
ty-five years. The exchanges were a logi- 
cal consequence of the law of 1884, which 
gave a definite status to the trade-unions. 
The first bourse was opened in Paris in 
1886, and the example was quickly followed 
b}- .\imes, Marseilles, Toulon, Bordeaux and 
other large towns. In 1907 there were 131 
bourses in France, to which 2586 trade-un- 
ions belonged, with an aggregate member- 
ship of 455,790. In 1906 the results were as 
follows: Applications, 111,613; places of- 
fered, 84,139; situations filled, 62,324, the 
municipal and departmental appropriations 
amounting to only about $90,000. On its 
face this looks like a highly successful show- 
ing, for naturally workmen who file appli- 
cations may seek and secure employment 
through other channels. Why then the Brit- 
ish system, which is to start with 220 ex- 
changes throughout the country, should cost, 
as estimated by the Government, $1,000,000 
yearly for its first ten years, is not clear in 
the light of French experience. 

But the problem of the unskilled workers, 
who, without organization among them- 
selves, without sick and old-age funds or in- 
surance against unemployment, are often the 
least efficient and thrifty of all, is still too 
puzzling for even the most paternalistic gov- 
ernments to soh'e. — New York World. 



CANCER IN BELGIUM. 



The new organization for combating can- 
cer in Belgium held a meeting at Brussels 
recently and outlined a comprehensive plan 
for its future activity. The association will 
affiliate with the international association 
for the systematic study of cancerous dis- 
eases. One of its first tasks will be to ac- 
(juire and systematize all knowledge of the 
disease. It will endeavor to give to the 
medical profession the results of its research 
in order that the disease may be combated 
with better results. It was also pro])osed to 
establisli one or more institutions in Bel- 
gium to be devoted especially to the study 
of cancerous diseases. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Taylor's Nautical School 



According to official reports, there 
were seventy-one deaths front bu- 
bonic i)higue and tifty-four deaths 
from cliolera in Amoy for the fort- 
night ended October 2. 

Over a hundred scholars have al- 
ready registered to enter the new 
German-Chinese high school at 
Tsingtau, China, which will be offi- 
cially opened on the 25th of this 
month. 

Van Orley's famous picture of "riie 
Last Judgment," which was painted 
on wood in 1535, has been sold to a 
New Yorker. Neither the name of 
the buyer nor the price has been 
made public. 

The Colombian Government is in- 
sisting upon the adoption of measures 
restricting the liberties of the press. 
Newspaper proprietors have protested 
vigorously, and the dispute promises 
to a bitter one. 

No fewer than 9 per cent of the 
carcasses of Chinese hogs recently 
imported into England and thus far 
inspected by the sanitary committee 
of London have been found to be af- 
fected with tuberculosis. 

The military post of Batum, on the 
Black Sea, has been abolished by Im- 
l)erial order. The closure of Batum 
in 1886 constituted one of the early 
violations of the treaty of Berlin and 
resulted in grave international com- 
plications. 

The International balloon race for 
the Gordon Bennett cup was won by 
Edgar W. Mix, the .American aero- 
naut, of Columbus, O. Mi.K landed 
north of Warsaw', in Russian Poland, 
covering a distance of 695 miles from 
Zurich. 

The cholera epidemic in St. Peters- 
burg continues to run its course. The 
cases average thirty a day. Thirty- 
four of the servants of the Medvied 
restaurant, a fashionable resort of the 
capital, have been striken with the 
disease. 

A dramatic narrative of the killing 
of Brunhuber and Schmidtz, leaders 
of a German exploring expedition in 
China, near the Burmese frontier, 
some months ago, has been published 
by the Algemeinde Wissenschaft- 
lichen Berichte. 

President Diaz of Mexico has or- 
dered an investigation into the mys- 
terious disappearance of a large 
amount of money which was recently 
dispatched from San Francisco for 
the sufferers from the disaster at 
.Acapulco. 

The trials and executions of revolu- 
tionists have been resumed at Barce- 
lona. Ramon Clementi was shot on 
October 4 for "rebellion, profanation 
of the bodies of convent sisters, and 
setting hre to a factory, in which 
several persons were asphyxiated."' 

.Ml the shops of Belgrade were 
closed on October 7 and the public 
buildings of the city were draped in 
black to mark the first anniversary 
of the annexation of the provinces of 
Bosnia and Herzegovina by .Aus- 
tria-Hungary. Servian students pa- 
raded the streets shouting "Down 
with Austria!" 

The Neptune, England's eighth bat- 
tleship of the I3readnought class, or 
the eleventh, including the three bat- 
tleship cruisers represented by the In- 
flexible, now participating in the Hud- 
son-Fulton celebration at .New York, 
was launclied at Portsmouth on Sep- 
tember 30. The Neptune has a dis- 
placement of 20.250 tons. 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
tind best equipped private Nautical School in 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
.Vmerican and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant officers of the United States 
Xavy prepared for examination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Per.sonal instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor. M. A.. Compass Adjuster. Certified In- 
structor. Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters, including Naturalization. 



ROOS BROS. 

Biggest Values in Men*s Clothing, 

Haberdashery, Hats 

5o years~Tn"business 

ROOS^BROS. 



MARKET STREET 



San Francisco 



MARSHFIELD, OR. 

UNION CIGAR STORE 

383 FRONT ST. 

MARSHFIELD, OREGON 

Dealers in 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO, CANDY, 

NUTS, ETC. 
Longshoremen and Sailors' Headquarters 
HERMAN CORDES. Prop. 
Phone 97-L 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
seaman Ernst Dau, please notify the 
German Consul at San Francisco. 

James Thoburn was at the Sea- 
men's Institute about 1902. Letter 
awaiting him at 242 Steuart street, 
San Francisco. 

Arthur John Martin. Was in San 
Francisco last March. Any news of 
him sent to Seamen's Institute will be 
appreciated. 

Robert Fordyee Bovvers, over 5 
feet in height, rather stout, was in 
American Navy during 1906. Letter 
awaiting him at Seamen's Institute, 
242 Steuart street, San Francisco. 

Robert Fordyee Bowers, age 33 
years, height over 5 feet, stout build; 
correspondence awaiting him at Sea- 
men's Institute, 242 Steuart street, San 
Francisco. 

John M. Murphy, dark hair, blue 
eyes, height S feet 8, smooth face. 
Last heard of at Oakland. Any in- 
formation, communicate Seamen's In- 
stitute, 242 Steuart street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Harry W. Morse, of Watertown, 
Mass., about 5 ft. 8, light hair, blue 
eyes, wore glasses. Enquiry from 
Lillian J. Morse. Letter awaiting him 
at Seamen's Institute, Steuart street, 
San Francisco, 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Any one 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Portland, 
Ore. 

Henry Laurent, who has been sail- 
ing between San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 

John Johnson, a native of Norway, 
born September IS, 1858, at Blege- 
leidet Bamle; last heard from in 1904 
living at 230 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, 165 Third 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The Pride O'Humboliit 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOtDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," th« "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigar*. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, • Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers In Enter- 
prise Imager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



GOOD 


FOR A 

CUP OF 


COFFEE 


OR A 


SQUARE MEAL | 




TRT 




EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The five sailors who left the schoon- 
er A. J. West at Honolulu, on March 
30, 1908, are requested to communicate 
with the Secretary of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific. The libel against 
the A. J. West has been adversely de- 
cided by the Federal Court at Hono- 
lulu. 



HE LIVES UP TO HIS NAME 

WHO 

Why Boss the Boss Tailor 




HE EMPLOYS ONLY FIRST- 
CLASS UNION HELP 
NUF CED. 

Boss the Tailor 

1120 MARKET ST. 

Opposite Seventh San Francisco 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a. rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce. letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 



Alien, W. J. 
Anderson, Alf. 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson. Carl P. 
Ankerstrom, C. 
Anker, C. 
Berentsen, R. 
Benson, E. 
Bianca, F. 
Bird. Chr. 
Bray, A. E. 
Brauer, Geo. 
Brown, Jim 
Burkland. John 
Carlson, Ole 
Carlson. Ludwik 
Carlson, Thure 
Carneii, Geo. B. 
Christofferson, Emil 
Christensen, Vlggo 
Chapman, F. G. 
Conee. A. 
Coughlan, Chas. 
Daly, John 
Daniels, C 
Drcifelt. Albert 
Doll. Herman 
EgelkolT, Fred 
Elliot. W. V. 
Eliasen, E. 
Engberg. Oscar 
Ernst. George 
Erick, Mr. 
Erikson, Alton 
Erlckson, Axel R. 
Espy. Orville 
Flynn, Maurice 
Kjelstad, K. M. 
Franzell, Arthur 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
Gekler, Fritz 
Gonyt-tte, Joseph 
Gustafson, Karl O. 
Hansen. H. C. -1998 
Haga. A. Andersen 
Hansen. T. S. 
Haug. H. H. 
Hansen, H. Johan 
Hansen, H. K. 
Harris, Jos. E. 
Hedlund. Arvid 
Hellwood. Mr. 
Hewitt, P. 
Jensen, Johannes 

-16S4 
Jensen, Louis 
Jersrh, W. 
Jorgensen, J. A. 
Jocketyn, J. 
Johnson, C. F. -1566 
Johnson, Eric 
Johnson, P. K. J. 
Johnson, Chas. 
Johnson. C. J. 
Jolinsen. Hans 
Johansen, Knut 
Johansen, Alf. 
Johanson, Victor 
.lohnson. Emil 
Klintberg, Chas. 
Kieine, Carl 
Klausen. Karl 
Klingenberg, John 
Kristiansen, Louis 
Kristoffersen. Emil 
Kri.stiansen, Nils 
Lathonen, Frank 
Larson. H. C. M. 
Latz. Konstant 



Lauritsen, Hans 
Larsen, Kristian 
Laive, V. 
Linder, Victor 
Lind. Hjilmar E. 
Lorln, Kristian 
Mathison, Nils 
Martinson. Christ. 
Machado, E. 
Malmberg, A. C. 
Magnusen, E. W. 
Martinsohn. A. 
McMahon. J. 
Mehuet, Jas. 
Mikkelsen, Kristian 
Miller, Adolf 
Molver. Olaf 
More. A. O. 
Morrison, J. 
Monoghan, J. 
Moore, James 
Nagel, A. 
Nelsen. M. 
Ness, Carl 
Nielsen, Wilhelm 
Nielsen, B. P. 
Nielsen, Waldemar 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsson. Just 
Olsen, O. A. -872 
Olason, A. 
Olsson, Johan 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olson, Charles 
Orten, Sigurd 
Owens. J. IL 
Peters. J. 

Pettersen. Sigurd 
Pernin, Chr. 
Pertells, W 
Penny, W. 
Petersen, P. 
Price, Bruce 
Rasmussen, A. N. 
Rasmussen. R. -525 
Reinman. Karl 
Rider, Arthur 
Rider, David 
Rugland. Ole 
Sandstrom. Th. 
Sanchez, F. 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Saalenes, T. J. 
Samuelson. Harold 
Schmak, M. 
Scherlen. Robert 
Schultz. Ernest 
Sckubber, H. 
Skoog, .\ugust 
Soderlund, J. F. 
Solly, Ed. 
Sorensen, Hans 
Stoff, K. 
Syvertsen, Ole 
Swanson, J. 
Sunby, A. E. 
Tellefsen. Peder 
Thompson, T. 
Thorn, Arvid 
Torgersen, Ludvig 
Tockelyn. T. 
VIotorsen. Ernest M. 
Warren, Louis 
Wallace, A. 
Walter, E. R. A. 
Wennecke, A. 
Wifstrand, C. T. 
Worm, Albert 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods. Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes. Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street. near Burnilde 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. J0HN50N 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
Offlce: 
23 UNION AVENUE - - Portland, Ore. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, 


WASH. 


BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

. Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 
116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &t CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots. Oilskins 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 




OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 



"THE WHITE HOUSE" 

ALEXANDER & McBRIDE 

403 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 



Flannel Shirts, 



Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, BOc. 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Rod Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes. Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. Ail orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 

around the corner from the Union OfBce. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 




MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

11 Coleman Dock, SEATTLE, Wash. 

OfHce Phone, Ind. 1713. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Genta' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
lit Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westcrtnan & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed in the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation In a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

494 ARCADE BUILDING 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



Flrst-Class Workmanship, Perfect Fit 

Phone Sunset Main 3771 

A place to go wlien others fail to satisfy. 

STRICTLY UNION HOUSE. 

NILS HOKANSON 
High Class Tailor 

106 SPRING STREET, bet. 1st and 2nd 
Seattle, Wash. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Alfred Douglas Brakel, a native ofi 
Russia, also known as Fred Hansen, 
left the Russian cruiser Lena; last 
heard of about three years ago, is in- 
(juired for bj his mother. Ad'Jress, 
"Coast Seamen's Journal." 



Eight men were drowned and seven 
had a narrow escape from death by the 
foundering of the Norwegian steamer 
Gere, six miles from the Winter Quar- 
ter lightship on September 25. 

The Navy Department has issued or- 
ders that the ram Katahdin be towed 
from the League Island Navy Yard at 
Philadelphia to Hampton Roads, Va., 
to become a target for naval guns. 

From the bridge of his Arctic ship 
Roosevelt, Commander Peary was the 
most prominent feature of the sixty- 
mile Hudson-Fulton naval parade from 
New York to Newburgh on October 
1, 

The discovery of the North Pole by 
Commander Peary and Doctor Cook 
has necessitated a revision of the cir- 
cum-polar chart issued by the Hydro- 
graphic Office of the Navy Depart- 
ment. 

Michael J. Conlon, of Woodbridge, 
N. J., a first-class boatswain's mate of 
the United States Navy, has been 
recommended by the Secretary of the 
Navy for a lifesaving medal for his 
courageous conduct in rescuing a sail- 
or. 

The schooner Lou, brought around 
the Horn in 1850 and used by pirates 
and filibusters, and which took part in 
San Francisco history, has been 
bought by a representative of the Gov- 
ernment to be used as a target for 
the big guns at Fort Rosecrans. 

The eighty-ton American fishing 
schooner Caldwell H. Colt was cap- 
tured for poaching by a Mexican gun- 
boat immediately following the recent 
storm. Her master, Joseph H. Gallico, 
and his crew of eight men are now 
confined in a Mexican prison at Pro- 
greso. 

The Ward liner Monterey, which ar- 
rived at New York on September 24, 
brought Captain Allen and seven of 
the crew of the American schooner 
Stillman F. Kelley, which was wrecked 
on a small key six miles north of An- 
guiila Island, near Cuba, on September 
14. 

Captain Littlejohn and the five men 
of the crew of the schooner Charles J. 
Wiliard, which sunk near Sow and 
Pigs Shoal recently were taken to 
Vineyard Haven by the schooner Au- 
gusta. The captain thinks his vessel 
struck some submerged obstacle, prob- 
ably an old wreck. 

The financial report of the North 
German Lloyd Steamship Company 
for the first six months of 1909 shows 
net earnings, less general expenses 
and interest charges, of $1,250,000, as 
against losses for the corresponding 
period of 1908 amounting to $1,750,000. 
This improvement is due chiefly to the 
emigrant business to the United 
States. 

The City of Philadelphia, one of the 
two Delaware River steamboats that 
are being constructed at the yards of 
Harlan & Hollingsworth, Wilmington, 
will probably be launched in Decem- 
ber. She is being built for the Wil- 
son Line, and will ply between Phila- 
delphia and Wilmington. The other 
vessel will he named City of Wilming- 
ton. 

Settlement has been effected by the 
Cunard Steamship Company with the 
underwriters for the loss of the steam- 
ship Lucania, which was burned at her 
dock at Liverpool several weeks ago. 
The vessel was insured for $800,000. 
but the company agreed to accept 
$500,000 and retain what remains of 
the vessel, which was declared to be 
technically a total loss. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter List. 



William K. 1 l<.;ir>l has accepted the 
nomination tor Mayor of New York 
as an independent candidate. 

The Cleveland Railroad Company 
has agreed to establish a three-cent 
fare, with one cent extra for a trans- 
fer. 

I'resident Taft arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on October 5 and left that ciiy 
on the following daj- for the Yosemite 
Valley. 

Commander I'eary has accepted 
the invitation of the National Geo- 
graphic Society to submit his proofs 
to it for verification. 

.\fter holding several conferences, 
the Western railroads have decided 
to cut out all stopover privileges on 
short term tickets beginning January 
I. 

I'or the first time since the early 
part of 1<S97. the railroads entering 
Baltimore, especially those having a 
large coal tonnage, are facing a car 
famine. 

.\ sliortage of rublter throughout 
the world is creating an alarming 
cciiulitimi in the automobile industry, 
and especially in the tire manufactur- 
ing branch. 

Two distinct earth shocks were felt 
at Dalton, Ga., on October 8, accom- 
panied by a booming sound. Houses 
were shaken throughout the town, but 
no damage is reported. 

Ten Mexican railroad laborers and 
live white men were killed and ten 
were injured in a Santa Fe wreck on 
October 8 on the Atchison branch on 
the outskirts of Topeka, Kas. 

Secretary of War Dickinson has de- 
nied a report that he contemplated 
resigning from the Cabinet because 
of illness in his family and the recent 
death of bis daughter-in-law. 

h'iftecn men were killed or fatally 
injured in an explosion of gas in the 
.-baft of mine Xo. 4 of the North- 
western Improvement Company, at 
Roslyn, Wash., on October ,1 

Twenty-five thousand men of arms, 
representing thirty-seven nations, took 
part in the military parade in New 
York City on September 30, as a fea- 
ture of the Hudson-Fulton celebration. 

Race suicide landlords in Chicago 
must submit to a court test of a new- 
State law which became effective July 
1 last forbidding them to refuse ren- 
tal of apartments to families with 
children. 

The verdict of the trial court which 
found John R. Walsh guilty of mis- 
application of the funds of the Chi- 
cago National Bank was afifirmed by 
the United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals at Chicago on October 5. 

.\ cut of ten per cent in salaries of 
all officials and employes of Chicago 
from Mayor Busse's $18,000 down to 
the lowliest laborer, has been agreed 
upon by the Mayor and department 
heads owing to lack of money in the 
city treasury. 

A rich pay streak ten miles long 
and hundreds of feet wide has been 
uncovered in the bed of the Upper 
Koukarok River, .Ma.ska. One nugget 
found is worth $200. The district 
promises to be the best in the whole 
Seward Peninsula. 

.•\braham C. Fby, formerly Mayor 
of Burkeville, Va., who was convicted 
recently of using the mails to extort 
money from the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company, was sentenced at Phil- 
adelphia on September 30 to eighteen 
months in the Government prison at 
Atlanta, Ga. 



I..etteis at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
montlis only and will be returned to the 
I'ost Office at the expiration of four 
niontlis from date of delivery. 

Members wliose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors" 
Union. San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abbors, Arne 
Aga. Johan 
Aliern, Dan 
Akerson, Clias. A. 
Alver. A. M. 
.\nileisen. Kinar 
Andersen, Chr. 
Andersen, -1562 
Andersen, Sam 
Andersen. I^ais 
Andeisen. Anton 
Andersen, -1108 
Andersen, -laU 
Andersen, -104S 
Andersen, -li'i60 
Anderson, Robert 

Haird, W. 
Barlels, Herman 
iiarrinto, J. 
Beck, Mr. 
Beekman. Rudolph 
Bergstroni. Frank 
Belin, Erik 
iienscii, B. 
nens()n-1454 
Benson. Jno. A. 
Berg, Julius 
Ht'ilinz. Kniil 
Berntsson, M. 
Bevilaeqiie, O. 
Birde. Chr. 
Birkelund, R. 
Blindheim. O. C. 
Blomcivist, Chas. 

C'arlBren-644 
Carlsen, Sigurd 
Curlyon. Alfred 
Carlson-760 
CarU.on, Fred 
Carlson. John 
Carlson, -106:5 
Carlson, Chas. 
Carlsson, John W. 
Carnaghan, Mr. 
Christensen, Hans 

Dahl, John B. 
linhlman. J. A. 
Inez, Th. H. 
l.)ixon, John 
Doose, Wm. 
Dories, H. 

Kdman-557 
Kggers, J. 
Kklund, Harry 
Ekwall, G. A. 
Eliasen, C 
Kliasen. -396 
Eliassen. Sigurd 
Ellingsen, Fred 
EngLierg, Oskar Leo 
Engblom, Albert 

Farnen, W. L. 
Faulkner, John E. 
Feelej-, Thomas 
Fcldt. K. G. U. 
l-ogland, Arthur 



Anderson, I>. H. 
Anderson, -779 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, John 
Andersson, Einil 
Andersson, Karl T. 
Andersson, Julian 
Andersson- 1552 
Aiitell, Fn-d 
Antonsen, Marius 
Arnesen, Isak 
.Vrnold, E. H. 
Arnlsen. Julian 
Aunbaun, A. 
Aylwai'd, Jas. 

Bohm, Emll 
Boisen. Jorgen 
Borresen, Niels 
Bourbigou, l.,<)Uls 
Bower, G. 
lioyesson, John 
Brandt, Oscar 
Bray. John K. 
Bray, Edward 
Bregler, Fred 
Brewer, Wm. 
Brlnton, Geo. 
Browne, Harold W. 
Brox. Harry 
Bryde, Carl M. 
Buaas, Thomas 
Bung, B. 

Christensen-905 
Christensen. S. 
Christensen-1332 
Christensen, -1126 
Christiansen, J. F. 
Christensen. E. H. 
C'hristoffer.sen. Jacob 
Chisholm. R. 
Claus. C. 
Couglilan. -1174 
Cutler, Wm. 

Dracar, Edgardo 
Drausmann. Chas. 
Dully, Alex 
Uunean, G. M. 
Durholt, Hugo 

Eriksen, E. H. 
Eriksen, Karl J. 
Erikson, E. W. 
Eriksson, -333 
Erickson, A. 
Erickson, Fred 
Erieson, C W. 
Erikson, P. E. 
Espensen, E. N. 

Folwick, Carl 
Frankovieh, A. 
Frederiksen, B. 
Fredrieksen, -529 
Froberg, T. W. 



Gabrielsen, ElUng Gunnarson, John 



Ceiger, Joe 
Gerner. Hans 
Gibbs, Harry D. 
Grunman, H. R. 
Gulberson, A. 

Haagensen, M. 
llallenberg, S. G. 
Halloran, Clias. A. 
Hallstrom, J. E. 
Halvorsen, H. E. 
Halvnisen, Johan 
Halvorsen, Severm 
I lalvorsen. Wm. 
Hansen-1869 
Hansen, Emil 
Hanson, John 
Hansen, -1195 
Hansen-1576 
Hansen, H. T. 
Hansen, Jens M. 
Hansen, Theo. 
Hansen, Enok 



Gunderson, Ole 
Gundersen-785 
Gundersen, Martin 
Gustafsson, G. B. 
Gutierez, A. 

Hansen, Charles 
Hanson, R. W. 
Hanmning. Fritz 
Hedlund, Orvid 
Heesche, H. 
Hegener, Reinhold 
Heinz, Jack 
Hendriksen, Adolf 
Henriksen. Adolf G. 
Hent.schel, Otto 
Hermansen. -1622 
Hewston, Jas. 
Hoglund. Frank 
Holt. Karl C. 
Holz-1764 
Hultberg-1833 
Hultman. Albin 



Ingebretsen. -125 Ingwardsen. R. 

Ingenian. -132 Isaacsen, Isaac 

Ingvalsen, Ingo. Itvelt. F. 



Jacobson. Gust. 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen, Chaa. 
Jensen. -1076 
Jenson. T. C. 
Jespersen, Martin 
Johanessen, M. B. 
Johannessen, -1S63 
Johansen. C. H. 
Johansen-1191 
.lohanson, -880 
Johan sson-lSS6 

Kaho, H. 
Kalman, L. 
Kamp. Gus H. 
Kane, G. 

Kannisto, K. J. O. 
Karlson, Aug. 
Karlsen. Konrad 
Karlsen-270 
Karlson. Richard 
Karlgren-644 
Kavall. John 
Keelan. J. 
Kellgren, J. A. 
Kenniston, Frank 
Kerch, Geo. C. 

Laason, -1790 
l.aason. M. 
l.ahr. Otto 
Lane. Leonard 
I>ane. I..eeland 
1 .anghen. Chas. 
Langdon. Chas. 
Langvardt. Chr. 
Larsen. Peter 
Larsen-1536 



Johansson, Oscar 
Johnscn, -1281 
Johnson, Geo. 
Johnson, Hilmer 
Johnson, Richard 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnaon-lSOO 
Johnson, Fred 
Johnsson, Frank 
Jonassen, Johan 
Jouanne, Walter 

Kerr, Wm. 
Klaesson, Axel 
Klotzke, Otto 
Knudscn, Lars. 
Koff, M. 
Kolter, L. 
Kopats, Oscar 
Krane. T. 
Kreftcnsen. C. E. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kristoffersen. -1288 
Kristiansen, L. A. 
Kristoffersen, Andre 
Kuehme, W. 

Larson, L. 
Lass, -1406 
Lauretsen, Ole 
Lehlo, Alex. 
Lclbold, Fritz 
Leitboff. Carl 
Llndholm-610 
Linderos, Wm. 
Lindvist, Carl A. 
Lindroes, Oscar 



Lindgren, G. 
Lohne, E. 
Lommos, Henri 
Luders, C 

Madsen, -9.'>2 
Malmherg. Elis 
Mannik, John 
Margnusson, E. W. 
Marius. Bernhard 
Markmann. H. 
Markus. B. 
Martinsson. Josef 
Martin. Geo. 
Mathiesen. L. 
Matthews. H. J. 
Mattler. Franz 
McEmbers, R. 

Naber, M. 
Nauinan. Alf. 
Nesbitt, J. 
Nester, Wilson C. 
Nielsen, -950 
Nielsen, -918 
Nielsen, John N. 
Niemi, Fr. 
Nilsen, Anders 
Nilsen-985 
Nilsen, Glaus 
Nilsen, -346 

Oberg, C. V. F. 
O'Ualy. John 
Olafsson. M. 
Olsen. Olai 
Olsen, Gust. 
Olsen, Soren 
Olsen, Marinus 
Olsen, -ilX 
Olsen. Paulus 
Olsen-996 

Pache, Paul 
Palizek, Lorenz 
Pedersen, S. Rein- 
hold 
TVilersen. Olav 
Pedersen. -113,S 
Pedersen. Oliif Chr. 
Pedersen. N. B. 
Pedersen. Pe<lar M. 
Pedersen, Olaf A. 
Peilerscn, -10S6 
Pedersen. -1110 
Persson, Hjalmar 

Ramlov, Emil 
Rasmussen, -525 
Rasnmsen. Robert 
Rjismusen. -923 
Rasmuson. A. 
Reese. -685 
Reiehelt. H. A. 
Remnier. Louis E. 
Reiitern. -■Xxel 
Rigoult. Bert 
Roalsen. F. E. 
'Robinet, G. 

Sampson, Carl 
Samsing, Carl 
Sandberg. N. A. 
''ander. Chas. 
Sandell. -2222 
Sauer. Emil 
Scarabosio. M. 
Schevig. A. B. 
Sehluter. Paul 
Sehniehl, Paul 
Schmidt. Fritz 
Rchmitt. Geo. 
Sehneckloth. Ed. 
Sehrodt, Alf. 
Sehultz. .-Ml.ert 
Schutz. Ludvig 
Scliiiltze. Axel 
Schwenkt. Kan 
Srhwitzcr. Herman 
Scott. Ed. 
Remberg. John 
Siebert. Harry 
Siem. C. 

Silfberberg'. Harold 
Simpson. L. C. 
Smith. Fred 
Smith, -648 
Smith. John V. 

Teigland, Karl 
Thorsen-fil5 
Thorsen-689 
Thorn. Arvid 
Thorsell, Ch. 
Tillman. Chas. 
Tiller, E. 

Utves, K. L. 

V.aleur. Marius 
Vega. F. A. 
Verdiek. C. 

Wahlstrom, Alb. 
Wakely. R. E. 
Wallin. John 
Watson, A. J. 
Welsen. J. 
Werner. I'aul 
Westhofer. H. 
Wetzel, Curt 
Weyer. Paul 
Weyman, Emil 
Whiteley. James 

Ziffer, Chas. 
Zimmerman, F. 



lAindgren. -1295 
Lundberg, John 
Lundberg, Fred 
Lubke, J. 

McKinley, Wm. 
Meetz, H. 
Mehent, Joe 
Melin, -1712 
Mells, G. A. 
Mersman. A. 
Mesak. Edw. 
Mikkelsen. A. S. 
Miller. Jas. 
Mittemeyer, J. F. 
Moller, L, 
Monroe, Geo. E. 
Muiize. Dick 

Nilsson. Henning 
Nilsson 895 
Nilsson. Adolf H. 
Nilsson, Edw. 
Nils.son, -935 
Nilsson. Carl F. 
Nobereit. Gus 
Norris, N^. A. 
Norvik, Morten 
Nurmi, V. 
Nurman, Y. 



01s.<!nn, Axel 
Olsson. John Osear 
Olsson, Alf. 
Olsson, J, W. 
Ols.son. Karl 
Osol. Th. R. 
Osterdahl. Chas. 
Ostlund. Kdwanl 
Ounpaum. A. 



Peterson. Henry 
Petersen, Clias. 
Petersen, -782 
Peterson. -12S4 
Peterson. -1164 
Pettersen. O. T. 
Petterson, Osear 
Petterson, Anton 
Picard, Frank 
Potters. J. 
Pratt. Mr. 
Purnhagen, Ludv. 

Robsham. Jens W. 
Roehov. Steven 
Rokov, Steffan 
Rommel. Andrew 
Rosenvald. Isak 
Rost. K. G. 
Rotlov. St. 
Rou.i.sel. Fernand 
Rudberg. C. 
Ruthberg. E. 
Rylts. A. 
Ryberg, S. 

Smith. Jas. B. 
Soderlund. A. 
Soland. Hans 
Solberg. T. 
Soreiisen. -1492 
Sorensen. -1664 
Southerland, A. 
Sovik. H. 
Sprague. C. B. 
Steen. Helmar 
Stein, John 
Stensland. Paul 
Stephens. -1979 
Steuslnff. Rniil 
Strand. Louis 
Strand. Olav 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Suominen. N. 
Sutlerez. Arthur 
Svendsen. A. F. S. 
Svendsen. Anker 
Svendsen. Otto .-X. 
Svendsen. Otto 
Svensson-1932 
Swensson, Martin 
Swansson. Emil 
Swensson, L. G. 
Syvertsen. Hans 

Tipp, T. 
Tofte. H. 

Torkelsen. Marinus 
Torvik. Olaf 
Trenton. I^ouis 
Tuvesson. .John 



Vickers, John 
Vortman. Wm. 

Wiekm;m, P. 
Wikland, Chas. 
Wikstrom. Wm. 
Wilke. Wm. 
Will, C. 
WHnblad. M. 
Winter. -in.T7 
Winters. Ch. 
Witol, E. 
Wolter. John 
Wunsdorf, Aug. 

Zimmerling, F. 
Zweyberg, J. 



PACKAGES. 
Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Andersson, Vlcktor 
Atkinson, Samuel 
Dahlman. Axel 
Hansen. Chas. 
Holmstrom, Carl A. 
Jensen, -1944 
Johnson, Chas. 
Johannessen, -1863 
Kolstad. Anton 



Morken. Kristian 
Osol. Theo. K. 
Rulilmann, Louis 
Ruthberg, E. 
Stangeland. Peter 
Torklldsen, Marius 
Wilberg, John 
Zininiernian. F. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Alfo, John 
Aeckerle. Ernst 
Anderson, Eskll 
Andersson, J. S. 
Berntsen, Julius 
Cox, H. E. 
Farm, J. B. 
Fostwedt, Carl 
Hultberg, Ernst 
Jensen, M. 
Jacobsen, Hans 
Johnson, C. A. 
Kearns, Edwin 
Koch, Carl 
Kjorsvik, Johan 
Kruger, Heinrlch 
Kent, Jack 
Klebingat, Fred 



Llndeman, A. 
Lorin, Cristian 
Lynd, Chas. 
Moren, E. H. 
Olson, Olaf 
Olson, Otto 
PonnJ Anton 
Patterson, A. K. 
Roalsen, Fred 
Rasmussen, Andrew 
Scott, Ed. 
Sundholm, Freppa 
Sehultz, Ernst 
Schmidt, Franz 
Schneider, William 

I. 
Sanchez, Frank 
Tamm, P. 



Taconta, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson. A. B. Jacobsen. Olai 

Anderson. Chas. -907Johanson. Emil 

Behrent, E. -1579 Larsen. Holger 



Berndt. Hugo 
Buhmeister, John 
Chapman. P. 
Charlson, M. 



Lund, Peter 
McGuire, George 
Meyers, Chas. 
Nilsen, Oscar L. 



Christoffersen, Emil Nordenberg, John 



Clausen, Nils 
Davey, Chas. 
Ekblom, Alfred 
Eklund, Sven W. 
Eliasen, E. -396 
Franzell. A. 



Olsen, Ole Johan 
Olsen, Sigvald 
Poppe, George 
Katshet, August 
Saunders, J. 
Sovig, Chas. 



Frederickson, F. H. Swanson, Ben 
-529 Turner. Alfred 

Hansen, Pete Turner, Richard 

Harris, J. Wells, Leo L. 

Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Ahrens, W. 
Anderson, E. 
Alexander, K. 
Arnold, E. B. 
Anderson, P. T. 
Anderson, Harry 
Andersson, J. R. 
Anderson, -1534 
Abbors, A. 
Anderson, Sven 
Appelgreen, J. 
Buehtman, F. 
Billington. M. 
Birkelund, R. 
Busse. Ch. 
Brandt, N. 
Benson, Jon. 
Boosban, Ch. 
C-arlson, K. J. 
Christensen, H. 
Christensen, C. E. 
iJuval, Benoit 
Dories, H. 
Dowe, J. 
1 lomhoft. J. 
Drager, Otto 
Kichel, Ch. 
Eliassen, H. -599 
Eliassen. G. -1427 
Focketyn, F. 
Furman. F. 
Frank, F. -499 
Goepper, Ch. 
Godley, Geo. 
Hansen, H. M. 
Haniger, A. J. 
Hammond. J. A. 
Harnmerqulst. A. J. 



Hope, Ole 
Jacobsen, -1786 
Johansson, 1700 
Johannesson, J. 
Jacobsen, Eriand 
Jensen, L. 
Jalonen, J. 
Johannesen, Carslen 
Kristiansen, L. 
Kavander, W. 
Kosklnen, W. 
Long, L. 
Lereh, I'aul 
Lewis, G. H. 
Lundgreen. C. 
Matsson, Karl 
Morris, Oscar 
Mulley, James 
Maibom, H. 
Metge, G. 
Morden, J. 
MIchalsen, J. 
Nielsen. V. -1000 
Olen. Thorn. 
Orten. S. 
Pierson. A. 
Pederson. -896 
Petersen, C. 
Pedersen, James 
Rantanen. -770 
Rustanious, J. 
Quistgard, C. 
Swales, A. E. 
Swansen, Carl 
Syversen, H. 
Tuvfeson, Knut 
Taddlken, A. 
Vongher, Ed. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Anderson. Sven 
Behiens, E. -1549 
Boyle. John 
Chapman, F. S. 
Hillig, Albert 
Hollberg, John C. 
Johansen, - 2021 
Knucken, T. 
Klebingal, Fred 



Lundgren, Carl 
MeCallum, Charles 
Nagel, Arthur 
Peterson. Paul 
Rosen feld. L. 
Stabell. Frank 
Sundquist. Carl 
Walser, Ernest 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S LETTER LIST. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Letters at the Alaska Fishermen's of- 
fice will be advertised for six months 
only and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of seven months 
from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify the 
Secretary of the Alaska Fishermen's 
Union of their present address. In order 
to have their mail forwarded them. 



Andreasen. Mogens 
Andersen. August 
Bakke. E. G. 
Benson. John 
Flynn. Mark 
Farrell. Henry D. 
Gulllksen. Gustav 
Green. John 
Hagen, G. L. 
Hansen, Harry 
Haglund, Wm. 
Hammerin. F. E. 
Johnson, George P. 



Kerr, Wm. 
Laguerwall. Ernst 
Lofman, K. 
Lahmeyer, H. 
Mullen. James E. 
Nielsen, Carl Johan 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olson, Ole 
Olsen. Olaf 
Prescott, Fred 
Rlise, Wm. 
Thompson, A. 
Tonnessen, Jorgen 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Anderson, H. A. 

-1449 
Anderson. Olof 
.\nderson. S. 
Armmi. Walter 
Bartels, C. H. 
Beary. Charles 
Bentsen. Bent 
Blunt. H. 
Bostrom, C 
Brander. Frank -144 
Christensen, H. C. 
Clemensen. C. H. 
Conaughton. H. 
Edlund, Gust 
Geiger, Joseph 
Grant, John 
Ounther, Theo. 
Gustafson, Edvart 
Halvorsen, Ingval 
Hollins, Frank 
Isaacson, Gustav 
,Tohnsen, J. 
Karlsson, A. E. 
Kittelsen. Chritian 
Knudsen. Jacob E. 



Lambar. Ermlnio 
Lorensen, Orgt. C. 
Mieheli, Agojtino 
Mittemeijer, J. P. 
Newman, J. S. 
Niccolai. Sant 
Nilsen. Ruder S. 
Nylund. Sven 
Olson, Bror 
Oman, Vlcktor 
SOlsen. C 
Oterdahl. Charles 
Pateejanski. R. 
Pedersen. P. G. 
Penny, Matt. 
Salminen. K. W. 
Shuils. Christ 
Sjellman, Jonas 
Svensen, Olof 
Stabell, Frank 
Teigland, G. 
Thoresen. G. 
Tlioresen, Petter 
Walbreth, Carl 
Wlckstrom. Charles 
Yannl, C. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters 'and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

(The German Bank) 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco.) 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,504,498.68 

Deposits, June 30, 1909 36,793,234.04 

Total Assets 39,435,681.3!s 

Remittance may be made by draft, postofflce 
or Wells, Fargo ,& Co. 's money orilery, or coin by 
express. 

Offlce hours — 10 o'clock a.m. to 3 o'clock p.m., 
except Saturdays to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday 
evcniiigs from 7 o'clock p.m. to 8 o'clock p.m. 
for receipt of deposits only. 
Oi'ficers. 

President, N. Oblandt; first vice president, 
Daniel Meyer; second vice presi<le')t, Einil Uolite; 
casbier, A. H. R. Scbmidt: assistant casliicr. 
William Herrmann; secretary. George Tourny; 
assistant secretary. A. H. Muller; GoodCellow 
& Eells. general attor'ie>s. 

Board of Directors. 
. N. Oblandt, Daniel Merer. Emil Robte, Ign. 
Steinhardt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, 
F. Tillmann Jr., B. T. Kruse and W. S. Good- 
fellow. 

Mission Branch, 2.'572 Mission street, between 
Twenty-first and Twenty-second streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 

C. W. Heyer, Manager. 
Richmond District Branch, 432 Clement 
Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. 
For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 
Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to J2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold 'Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Offlce open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 



THE ADMIRAL 

146 EAST STREET 

100 large, nicely furnished rooms from 
35c to $2 per day, ?2 to $5 per week. 

Electric Light and Call Bells, Hot and 
Cold Water, and Clean, Sanitary Bedding 
in Every Room. Electric Elevator Ser- 
vice. Free Baths. 

FERRY HOUSE 

CORNER EAST AND MISSION STS. 

Opposite Ferry Building 
EARTHQUAKE AND FIREPROOF 
The only house in the block between 
Market and Mission streets which was not 
injured by the great catastrophe of 1906. 
Nice Sunny Furnished Rooms from 25c 
to $2 per day; $1.50 to $6 per week; rooms 
for two persons $2.50 per week. 



BANNERS, REGALIA, ETC. 

Gold Bullion, Silk Embroidered and 
Painted Silk and Satin Banners; Hand 
Embroidered Silk American and Spe- 
cial Flags; Reversible and Ribbon 
Parade Badges; Silk and Satin Sashes 
and Regalia. All Union Made and; 
Manufactured by 

THE WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 

860 Mission St. Phone Kearny 1966 

Patronize Home Industry. 



Tel. 



EXPRESSIINQ 

done by 

E. BENELEIT, 
Stand at 
East and Howard Sts. 
James 411 San Francisco 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

109STEUARTST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION NADC 

BED SEAL CIGAR CO., liANUFACTUREBS 

133 HARTFORD ST., S. F. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

or CAUFORMU 

MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 

Branches: 624 Van Ness Avenue and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letters of Credit issued, payable in all parts of the world. 
Chas. F. Leege, Pres. W. A. Frederick, Vice-Pres. B. G. TognazzI, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vice-Pres. 



SOMETHING NEViT 

The Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

" ANTIDOTE, ■' 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
t a n t Advantages 
which can be found 
In No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking In. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first few smokes in 
an ordinary Pipe, 
the First Smoke in 
a n "ANTIDOTE" 
is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 
protects the briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" is always 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing it to pass off into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

KASSER BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET, S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




Best Suits in Town 

for the money 

at 

Capt.C.J.Swanson 

Up-to-date Clothier 
and Gents' Furnisher 

OilsKins, Gold Seal 

Rubberboots 

Uniforms, Hats and 

Shoes 

Pants a Specialty 

The main essential to working 
pants are good material and gcod 
vvorkmansliip. Then, as it costs no 
more, they may as well be properly 
cut. You get all these in "Stag" 
Union-made Trousers, guaranteed 
not to rip. Good for all purposes, 
priced $1 up to $7. 

119 EAST STREET 

Phone Douglas 1082 

San Francisco 




l^> m m y^ Tg^^ y -^ -g-^ ^-> See that this label (in light blue) 
^^^ f^^^l B^ ^ i^L_ I ^ l^^^^^appears on the box in which 



you are served. 



Issued by Authority of tne Cigar MaKers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

<Jhi$ SpVtrftf^J I'm Uii Cl^iiJ cwtained Inllil! box hive ban mxlB by« FlBl-CuSS \TOMI1 
3 MlMbCR OF rHt (Xm MAREKI 'mrUKATIOIUL union ol AmiIu. <n orgiliution devoted to tfic ad- 
vdncemtntollbeHOIlAlMATERlMjndlMtlinilAllNitrARtOFnitCRAff. '■ ' - ' 



thes« Cioars Xo all smoKers throinhot/t the wyld 
' All Inliiflgemenu upon thjs Label wb9 purushed eccofdm) tolaw. 



There^on we reconuatntf 



FAC 
>»« SIMIIE 



^ Tie (/iA/k^,ua. Presidtnt, 
V CM.Ucl 



ifAmeiica 




The strike of 300 Greek laborers in 
the Utah Copper Company's plant was 
settled on October 3. It is said that 
the company granted the demands of 
the strikers for an increase from $1.75 
to $2 per day. 

Samuel Gompers, President of the 
American Federation of Labor, who 
has been in Europe studying labor 
conditions, returned to the United 
States on October 8 on the French 
liner La Savoie. 

Announcement that the glass manu- 
facturers and workmen have reached 
an agreement was made at Woodbury, 
N. J., recently, but there is a feeling 
in some quarters that the reduction in 
the wage scale is greater than was ex- 
pected. 

The eleventh biennial convention of 
the Amalgamiated Association of 
Street and Electric Railway Employes 
of America opened at Torontf) on 
October 4. The association, which 
embraces the entire United States, has 
about 100,000 members. 

Peace for at least three years was 
assured in the street-car situation at 
Chicago by the signing by union offi- 
cials, representing the employes of the 
Chicago Railways Company, which 
operates the North and West Side 
lines, of the wage scale offered by the 
street-car officials. 

Suit was filed under the Alien-Con- 
tract Labor law against Frederick C. 
Roberts & Co., of San F'rancisco, in 
the United States District Court at 
San Francisco on October 8 to re- 
cover a penalty of $1000 for an alleged 
violation of the statute by the impor- 
tation of a laborer from Mexico. 

The labor trouble which threatened 
to shut down the smelter in Anaconda 
and at Great Falls, Mont., and throw 
15,000 persons out of work, has been 
settled. It is understood that the se- 
ceding engineers who withdrew from 
the Western Federation of Miners 
have gone back into that organization. 

A voluntary increase of one and 
two cents per hour respectively in 
wages for the 2200 motormen and con- 
ductors employed by the Detroit 
United Railways and on intenirban 
lines who have been in the service of 
the company for two and three years 
or more was announced on October 2. 

The 45,000 or more employes of the 
Rock Island Railroad system are to 
have the benefits of a comprehensive 
pension system, to go into effect June 
30, 1910. Compulsory retirement will 
occur at the age of 70 years and elec- 
tive retirement at 65. There will be 
no limit set upon the age at which 
the company will employ in tlie first 
instance. 

Director of Census Dana Durand 
believes that college students will 
make excellent Census cnuinerators, 
and he proposes to suggest that edu- 
cational institutions give leaves of ab- 
sence in April next to such students 
as may care to join the ariny of 65,- 
000 enumerators. Persons who accept 
this employment inay earn an average 
of $3 a day. 

James B. McLachlan, Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Nova Scotia branch 
of the United Mine Workers of 
America, has brought charges of con- 
spiracy to restrict the supply of coal 
in Nova Scotia, and thereby to raise 
prices unreasonably, against Alex- 
ander Dick,, sales agent of the Do- 
minion Coal Company, and John R. 
Cowans, manager of the Spring Hill 
coal iTiines. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Lovely.— For more than a week 
after marriage a man will eat things 
lie doesn't like just because his wife 
cooked them. — Chicago News. 



Important, After All.— Mrs. Young- 
wife — "What is the first question you 
ask of a maid whom you think of em- 
ploying?" 

Mrs. OUlonc — "I always say first, 
'Have you e\cr lived with me be- 
fore?' " — Life. 



Heard in the Ballroom. — Madge 
(proudly) — "Did you sec that hand- 
SDHie man I just danced w'ith?" 

Kate — "Yes; he has a jealous wife 
who will allow him to dance only 
with the plainest girls in the room." — 
Boston Transcript. 



Rather Rough. — Gunner — "And now 
comes a professor who declares that 
fruit is just as healthy with the skin 
on as it is peeled." 

Guyer — "M'm! I'd like to see some- 
body start him on a diet of pine- 
apples." — Chicago News. 



Will He Do It?— Ardent Lover— 
"I love your daughter, sir, and would 
i)e willing to die for her." 

Fond Father — "That's the right 
spirit, my boy; just take out a $10,000 
life insurance policy on your wed- 
ding day, and then hustle for your 
Paris green. — St. Louis Times. 



Discordant Note. — "Mr. Meckun, 
don't you think a woman should re- 
ceive a man's pay when she does a 
man's work?" 

"Why— er — look at the other side of 
the question a moment, will you? 
Think how many men are doing wom- 
en's work and not getting a cent for 
it." — Chicago Tribune. 



Puzzled the Old Folks.— Mrs. Hard- 
apple — "Zeke writes from college that 
since you called him down for spend 
ing so much money he is coming 
home in trepidation." 

Mr. Hardaiiplc (suspiciously) — 
"Trepidation? What is that — one of 
these here new-fangled gasoline cars? 
,\in't the trains good enough for that 
boy? — Chicago News. 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, eitiier of whom may 
deposit money for, or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 
DEPOSITARY OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Capital and Surplus $600,000. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

LKWIS I. COWGILL, President HENRY WILSON 

FKEL>EK1CK F. SAYRE, Vice-President ALBERT SUTTON 

L. M. MacDONALU, Cashier JACOB JENSEN 

J. C. ESCHEN W. H. LITTLE 

Money transmitted to all parts of thp world at lowt-st rales. 




Established 1686 



United States 
Watch Gub 

E. r. COLI^INS. Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

50 EAST ST., and 4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 




HGENT 



S. GOVERNMENT CHtRTS AND NiUTICAt niBllCATIONS 
HYDOGRtPHIC «ND GEODETIC 



H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Gore Dl Sactimenlo and Market Sts., $«N FttNCISCO. CAt. 

DEALER IN 

Watches, Chronometers, Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods, Diamonds 



MARINE CS, FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observation 
Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN 8. CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. 
Boss of the Road Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 
Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 



Try Bagley's 
Sweet Tips 

For Pipe or Cigarettes 

lOc Tins 



S" '■■~' Issu"! ijmkanuti) o( the c»- aBg 

ITOUCOiWORXtRS^geiS^k. INTERNATIONAL 1 (JINflOIV 



HJi^J;^^^ MADE 





^cmmmCh 



ill Wiiek Stpilrbl 
Tinutad be 1 ritn 



RELIABLE!- 



Tclcrhonc Kearny 3017 



Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 

715 MARKET STREET nut to Call Buildiiig 

Branch Store 2593 Mission Street near 22nd 

San Francisco, Cal. 

i ^. .- Largest and Finest Assortment in Diamonds 

' 'Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Silverware. Cut Glass, Opera 

Glas ses. U mbrellas and Silver Novelties. ^^^ 

^^ Eyes Eiamined Free by Eipert Opticians ^^ 

12K. I»K. & 14K. 5«Ild Gold Weddlnl Rings Sold by Weight 



UNITED STATES NAUTICAL COLLEGE 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

This Modern Navigation School has no superior in the world to-day. 
As a practical navigator the Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right experience and ability to teach you up-to-date 
methods in a systematic and easy manner. You can find one or more of our pupils 
on most any vessel sailing out of this port. ASK THEM. 

.■\rlvice on Maritime T,aw. Sliip's Business and Naturalization FREE. 
Evenings By Appointment. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 

320 MARKET ST., S. F. Visitors Welcome. Telephone Kearny 4686 



SAN FRANCISCO STORE 

Boys' All-wool 
Coat Sweaters 

90c Each 

$1.25 and $1.50 Values. 

.'\. splendid lot of these service- 
al)lc iind cmnfortable sweaters for 
hoys in all sizes from 24 to .^4 
inches. In shades of Oxford gray 
witli several different combinations 
of stripes down front and on pock- 
ets. 



979 to 987 Market 
25 to 33 Sixth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



PAGE 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Now located at 

82 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Francises 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

t-'urnisliing Goods, Hats. Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes. Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing:. Seamen's Outfits 
a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at ths 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake— Look for the Name 
and Number. 



Don't forget Charles Johnson's 

DEFENDER CIGAR STORE 

22 East St., San Francisco. 

My aim is to please everybody with 

good goods, fair prices and 

courteous treatment. 

Agent for Sheerin's Laundry. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
Political Printinga Specialty 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 
1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 
2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
I Seamen's Journal. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the InternationzJ Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXIII. No. 5. 


SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 20, 1909. 


Whole No. 2039. 





WORKERS OF THE WORLD. 



THE CORRESPONDENCE SHEET of the 
International Eederation of Transport 
Workers, published at Hamburg and 
edited by H. Jocliade, presents in its current is- 
sue a summary of the conditions of labor through- 
out the world, which afifords interesting reading 
to all concerned in the progress of the labor 
movement. Erom this summary we reproduce the 
following: 

"It seems as though the crisis in the universal 
trade and the universal traffic has now gradually 
reached its climax, because a slight improvement 
on the social market is reported from everywhere, 
so that it may be hoped that the near future will 
be a little less dull than it seemed but a short 
time ago. However, the working conditions in 
some countries in the transportation trades on 
water are still very hopeless indeed. A great 
number of ships are still lying idle in the great 
navigation centers. The offer of labor hands is 
much greater than the demand for same, and the 
result thereof is that the wages which had been 
secured during the good business times are being 
reduced again by the employers. The employers 
also try to provoke the organized laborers in an- 
other way by suddenly denying their former readi- 
ness to make contracts and by simply declaring 
that 'in our concerns we do not recognize labor 
organizations any more.' This trick has been car- 
ried out by the Lake Carriers' Association in 
North America. This great organization of em- 
ployers on the Great Lakes has up to the present 
recognized all the organizations in question 
(marine engineers, seamen, dockers and teamsters) 
as being capable to enter into agreements and has 
actually made longer working agreements with 
them. The agreements contained among other 
things the condition that only organized laborers 
should be emi)loyed ('Closed Shop'), and only 
in case it was impossible for the employers to 
get a sufficient number of organized laborers 
should they employ unorganized laborers. This 
clause became disagreeable to the employers and 
they tried consequently to get rid of same. The 
Lake Carriers' Association simply declared the 
'Open Shop,' with the aggravation, that in future 
only such laborers would be employed who signed 
a document stating that they did not belong to 
any organization. Then an enormous struggle 
broke out on May 1, which is still going on. 

"In other countries the employers are trying 
to proceed in a similar way. For instance, the 
shipowners on the northeastern coast of England 
reduced the wages by 10 shillings. A simihir 
trial (by 5 marks) was made by the German ship- 
owners in the Baltic Sea district. Very sad news 
has been forwarded to us from Spain. Owing to 
the lasting crisis, it was impossible to the loosely- 
combined Federation of Dockers and Seamen to 
maintain their position, because the offer of cheap 
labor hands became too considerable. To this 
was still added the systematic exclusion of all or- 
ganized laborers from every work and the pref- 
erence of yellows, etc., which sufficed to almost 
destroy such a I'"cderation as the one in Spain, 
which has no financial power of resistance. 
From Finland, we are also informed that it is 
only with great pains that the trade-unions of the 



dockers can maintain the old prices. The cm- 
ploycrs are trying to create a cheap troup of re- 
serve through the introduction of Eastlanders. 

"The rapid development of machine work (corn 
elevators, coal bunker machines, improved elevat- 
ing machines, etc.) in the great ports l-.as also 
helped to make a considerable number of labor 
hands superfluous, who now burden the general 
labor market and who are unable to find imme- 
diate employment (Antwerp, Rotterdam, Ham- 
burg). 

"As has already been said, the employers are 
trying to profit by the present situation and the 
result is that the laborers either take to measures 
of defense or are continually threatened by lock- 
outs. The latter is especially the case in Sweden. 
The Swedish laborship stands before the com- 
mencement of an enormous struggle, which will 
be fought between the united employers and the 
organized laborers similar to the struggle in Den- 
mark in 1899. 

"The strike of solidarity of the seamen in 
France with the postmen developed into a long 
struggle on the entire line, which secured some 
considerable improvements for the seamen. 

"Of the transport workers on land, it can be 
said in general that they have succeeded in main- 
taining even now the wages which they had se- 
cured during the good business times. We can 
even state the fact that in making new wage 
agreements it was possible in some instances to 
still secure increases in wage and reductions in 
the hours of labor, especially in Germany and 
Austria. The teamsters in Budapest (Hungaria) 
were less successful. 

"The street railway servants have also had va- 
rious struggles recently, which became necessary 
to prevent wage reductions, for instance, in North 
America and Italy. But their wage scales are in 
general less subject to alterations, also not in 
critical social periods, as their wage scales arc 
fixed by regulations for years to come. 

"The same applies to the railwaymen, especially 
to those who are employed by the State. As far 
as we know, no wage reductions have taken place 
anywhere, but in some countries the number of 
the servants emi)loyed has been decreased in such 
a way that the places which became vacant in the 
course of time were not filled again. The rail- 
waymen in North America succeeded, thanks to 
their strong organization, in preventing the inten- 
tion of the railway magnates to take away again 
the 10 per cent increase in wages which the rail- 
waymen had secured during the good business 
times. In England, they also succeeded in esca))- 
ing a reduction in wages. Some railway compa- 
nies were even compelled by a decision of the 
Central Conciliation Board to make considerable 
concessions. The railway servants in Prussia 
have through a wage regulation obtained partly 
very considerable increases, whereas the railway 
workers received nothing at all. A regulation of 
the wage scales is at present being prepared by 
the railwaymen in Switzerland, in Sweden, in 
Denmark and in Italy. The railwaymen in Aus- 
tria are still always occupied with the realization 
of the concessions secured by the recent struggles 
and with the regulation of the wage and working 
conditions, which has been necessitated by the 
last transfers of the railways from private posses- 
sion to the State. The railwaymen in France 



have done some very successful work for an im- 
proved form of the law regarding the Old Age 
pensions. 

"After perusal of this short interview it must be 
admitted that in spite of the quiet period there is 
fresh life everywhere in the ranks of the traffic 
and transportworkers. Everywhere they are try- 
ing to maintain what has been secured, to obtain 
new advantages and to protect the members of 
the organizations against the worst effects of the' 
social depression. 

"But the employers are also more and more 
combining. Only quite recently we could read as 
follows: 'Everything is now so far advanced that 
the International Shipping Federation can com- 
mence its work.' Also the combination of the em- 
ployers in the transportation and forwarding 
trades in Germany, Austria and Switzerland has 
been made known. We find ourselves in front of 
a completed fact and have to count in future with 
these important bodies. 

"Induced by the strike of the postmen in France, 
the governments have recently occupied them- 
selves very seriously with the right of organiza- 
tion and with the right of striking of the railway- 
men. In some countries, for instance in Holland, 
in Italy and in Turkey, it is denied to the rail- 
waymen on pain of penalty to go on strike. The 
organization of the railwaymen in Hungaria has 
been dissolved, and in Belgium, Prussia and 
Saxony the Railwaymen's Societies are only tol- 
erated as long as they occupy themselves with 
philanthropic tasks or work in a 'loyal' way. An 
intended reform of the right of coalition of the 
railwaymen.in Belgium has been withdrawn by the 
minister, Mr. Helleputte. The civil minister in 
Sweden made an attack upon the right of coalition 
of the railwaymen of the country. In Spain a 
.Strike law has been passed which provides, on 
pain of imprisonment or of penalty, that all strikes 
or stoppages of work in the concerns must be an- 
nounced to the proper authority 5 or 8 days in 
advance. The French Minister of Public Works, 
Mr. Barthou, has expressed himself very clearly 
on the right of striking of the railwaymen in 
France. He said at the beginning of July in Par- 
liament: 'I expect that it is proved to me that the 
railwaymen have not the legal right to go on 
strike.' Yet, generally speaking, the position of 
the railwaymen in the trade-union movement be- 
comes more and more difiicult. It will probably 
still necessitate very hard struggles before the 
railwaymen will secure for themselves those rights 
to which they are entitled as State citizens, and 
which they can claim as important factors in the 
social Slate system. 

"The statement that fresh life reigns every- 
where in the organizations is best proved by the 
number of conventions, annual meetings, etc.. 
which have been held' during the recent past. 
There have been held the conventions of the Sea- 
men of North America, England, Germany, Nor- 
way, Holland, I'rance, Italy, and the half-yearly 
meetings of the firemen and sailors of Denmark; 
the conventions of the Dockers of Norway and 
Holland; of the Street Railway Servants of Swe- 
den, Norway, Holland and Switzerland; of the 
Railv>':iynien of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Hol- 
land, Belgium, France, Italy, Switzerland, Austria 
.-md North .\merica; of the Transi)ortworkers of 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ITALIAN EMIGRATION TO AMERICA 



Italy and Russia belong to those coun- 
tries which for years past have supplied the 
greatest contingent of emigrants, more es- 
pecially to the United States of America. 
I'ut, in contradistinction to Russia, the 
luimber of emigrants who find their way 
back again to Italy is a very large one, as 
many Italians, as soon as they have realized 
a modest capital in America, wend their 
way homeward once more. The number of 
Italians emigrating and of those seeking 
repatriation during the last three years has 
fluctuated considerably, more especially 
with regard to the principal destination of 
emigration, the United States of North 
America. In the year 1907 some 300,000 
Italian emigrants, to deal in round numbers, 
left for the United States; in 1908 the num- 
bers had decreased to 131,000, considerably 
less than the half of the number who ex- 
patriated themselves in the preceding year. 
The figures made public for the first quar- 
ter of the current year show that the de- 
crease of emigrants to the United States, 
given in the reports for the preceding year, 
is not to be considered as a permanent one. 
From January 1 to March 31, 1909, 98,000 
Italians emigrated to the States; conse- 
quently, should the last nine months of the 
year keep pace with the first quarter, the 
figures for 1907 would be surpassed by 
something like 100,000 emigrants. The dif- 
ference in the number of those returning to 
Italy in these years, though not quite so 
startling, is a considerable one. In 1907, 
some 162,000 returned to Italy from the 
United States ; in 1908, 220,000. In the last- 
named year the number of those returning 
home was in excess of those emigrating. 
The number of those returning home dur- 
ing the first three months of 1909 is a very 
small one. Not more than 7700 persons re- 
turned to Italy during that period, as 
against 42,000 during the first quarter of 
the year 1908. Therefore, we see that the 
improved economic situation in the United 
States has led to a notable increase of emi- 
grants from Italy, and to a not less con- 
siderable falling off in the number of Itali- 
ans returning home. 

The figures dealing with the emigration 
of Italians to the South American republics, 
and with their return, show nothing like the 
same fluctuations. For example, in the year 
1907, 78,000 Italians emigrated to the Ar- 
gentine Republic, 21,000 to Brazil; whereas 
in 1908 the same countries show 80,000 and 
16,000 respectively. During the first three 
months of 1909 12,000 Italian emigrants ar- 
rived in the Argentine Republic, and 1800 
in Brazil, whereas the figures for the first 
quarter of 1908 show 14,000 and 4200 respec- 
tively. The figures dealing with the return 
of Italian emigrants from the South Ameri- 
can republics show the same amount of sta- 
bility. In 1907, 50,000 returned to Italy 
from the Argentine Republic, and 21,000 
from Brazil. In 1908 the corresponding 
figures amounted to 44,000 and 15,000. For 
the first quarter of >909 the figures give us 
9300 and 2100 as returning home, against 
8500 and 2100 in the preceding year. 

We see, therefore, that the number of 
emigrants leaving Italy for the South 
American republics, and the number of 
Italians returning home from those coun- 
tries has remained without important fluc- 
tuations during the last few years. This is 



a prodf that the Italian emigrants to South 
America, and more especially to the Argen- 
tine, Republic, which still remains the coun- 
try they chiefly favor, find the economic 
status of these countries to be a stable one. 
— Continental Correspondence. 



CANADIAN 'PHONE PURCHASES. 



The Canadian Province of Saskatchewan 
has followed the action of the Province of 
Manitoba and purchased for $367,500 the 
Bell telephone system in the Province. Ac- 
cording to statements made by the Provin- 
cial authorities, a number of important ex- 
tensions will be made throughout the Prov- 
ince. The Bell telephone lines in Saskatche- 
wan are in two divisions. The principal one 
extends from the Manitoba boundary to Re- 
gina and then north to Lumsden. It follows 
the Canadian Pacific Railway line pretty 
closely from the eastern boundary to Re- 
gina. Along this line the company has in- 
stalled exchanges at Moosomin, Wapella, 
Grenfell, W'olseley, Sintaluta, Indian Head, 
Qu'Appelle, Balgonie, and Regina. Besides 
this principal line the company has a line 
from Hague to Rosthern, with exchanges 
in both these towns. The company has ex- 
changes also in Prince Albert, Battleford, 
North Battleford, and Areola. 

The Saskatchewan government long-dis- 
tance line runs from Regina west to Cairn, 
via Moose Jaw, and south from Regina to 
North Portal, at the United States boundary, 
and through the towns of Rouleau, Mile- 
stone, Yellow Grass, Halbrite, Estevan, and 
others. The government lines under con- 
struction are as yet in two divisions. One 
runs southeast from Regina to Antler at the 
Manitoba boundary and through the towns 
of Sedley, Tyvan, Osage, Fillmo. ^. Creel- 
man, Howard, Forget, Areola, Carlyle, and 
Manor. Another line under construction by 
the government runs from Lumsden to Sas- 
katoon, via Craik, Davidson, Hanley, and 
Dundurn. 

The projected lines of the government are 
far-reaching. In the north a line is projected 
from Saskatoon to Prince Albert, via Ros- 
thern. From this line another long-projected 
line branches off north of Warman and, run- 
ning via North Battleford, goes to Lloyd- 
minster at the Alberta boundary. A line is 
also projected from Weyburn to connect 
with the line under construction near For- 
get. Another projected line runs from Es- 
tevan, via Oxbow, to Gainsborough. From 
Oxbow another projected line runs north, in- 
tersecting the line under construction at Car- 
lyle, and farther north the Bell line at Wa- 
pella. It then goes north to Estcrhazy and 
on to Yorkton. 



EDUCATION IN SHEFFIELD. 



The committee on education of Sheffield, 
Eng., has completed its estimates, and will ask 
for appropriations amounting to $1,741,073 for 
educational purposes for the year ending 
March 31, 1910. Of this amount $926,290 will 
be derived from Government grants, leaving 
$814,784 to be appropriated from the revenue 
of the city for the current year. This will be 
an increase of $11,495 by the city over its an- 
jiropriation of the previous year. The total 
amount to be expended for school purposes will 
be equal to nearly 10 per cent of the total reve- 
nues of the city. 



NO "HELLO" GIRLS IN GERMANY. 



The first automatic telephone exchange 
system in Germany has just been installed 
in Hildesheim by the Imperial German 
Postofficc, requiring no central to make the 
desired connection, each subscriber being 
his own exchange. The apparatus is like a 
clock, with indicating numbers. The Hil- 
desheim subscriber's set, connected to the 
automatic exchange, is composed of a disk 
on which are to be found ten holes num- 
bered from the bottom up, to 9. These 
holes are just large enough to permit the 
insertion of the average person's forefinger, 
the holes being on a movable disk. If, for 
instance, a person desires to be connected 
with No. 951, the subscriber first removes 
the receiver from the hook, then places his 
forefinger in the slot numbered 9, and ro- 
tates the disk as far as it will go — that is, 
until his finger strikes an obstruction. He 
then removes his finger from the slot and 
permits the disk to return to its normal po- 
sition under the action of a spring, where- 
upon the forefinger is inserted in the hole 
marked 5 and the disk is again rotated un- 
til the finger meets the obstruction, the disk 
being again permitted to return to its nor- 
mal position ; the subscriber then again 
places his forefinger in the hole marked 1, 
again rotates the disk and lets it return 
to zero. 

The manner in which the connection is 
made is as follows : When a subscriber ro- 
tates the disk by placing his finger in the 
hole 9 and rotates the disk he sends the 
requisite impulse over the line to the cen- 
tral office, to move, in the case of No. 951, 
the 100 switch nine steps, or, in other words, 
the switch picks out the ninth hundred. 
Similarly, when his finger is placed in the 
hole 5 and the disk is rotated, it is again 
rotated through a predetermined angle and 
sends back to the centra! office five im- 
pulses, which in turn move a final selector, 
which had in the meantime become con- 
nected to the 100 switch above referred to. 
five spaces, which will correspond to the 
50s in this particular 900; and so again with 
the 1, until finally the apparatus in the cen- 
tral office has been connected through to 
line No. 951 from the calling subscriber's 
line. It is not necessary for the subscrib- 
er to ring inasmuch as this is also done 
automatically. 

The subscriber, havmg finished, terminates 
the connection by hanging the receiver 
on the hook. Immediately another person 
can be called up. Should the subscriber 
wish to call while a number is in use he 
can get no connection until the user has 
ceased conversation, and this , of course, 
docs away with the annoying feature in 
telephones of being interrupted in the midst 
of a conversation by some one breaking in. 
By this system the subscriber can readily 
be connected at any time, whether day or 
night, and it is evident that it will ultimate- 
ly do away entirely with the exchange girl, 
as it reduces the cost of maintenance. The 
Government is energetically pursuing ex- 
periments for the improving of the present 
telephone system, and this automatic device 
seems to have solved the problem. 



For the housewife's benefit a recently- 
patented dishpan carries on one side a drain- 
ing rack for wet dishes. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 













^^^^ 




On the Atlantic Coast. 

( Contributed by the Atlantic Cout Seamen's Unions. ) 




^^^^* 













NAVAL RANK OF UNITED STATES. 



What must be remembered chiefly in con- 
nection with the decline of the United 
States as a sea power is the importance 
England will gain from that decline. The 
foreign policy of the United States will 
more and more tend to play second fiddle to 
the foreign policy of England. The British 
navy will always remain the biggest on the 
seas — let our German friends build ?s they 
may — and while that British navy over- 
shadows every other, the United States must 
perforce shelter itself behind the British 
Dreadnoughts. Intellectually America is an 
English province and in the respect of naval 
power America seems destined to become 
an English province likewise. Perhaps the 
native American lacks the grit for seaman- 
ship. The native American, it must be re- 
membered, is nowadays found far inland. 
The Atlantic Coast is inhabited, for the 
most part, by aliens who stream into New 
York, Boston and the coast towns. There 
they comprise the strength of the machine 
or corrupt element. For a true American, 
with Pilgrim or Cavalier blood in his veins, 
one must go to the Middle West or to the 
South. Now in the West and in the South 
the realities of naval power are seldom 
made living issues to the population. The 
Southerners never took particularly to the 
sea. That was the calling of the New 
Englanders. The States of Ohio, Indiana 
and Illinois, where the inhabitants of the 
older stock have made their homes, never 
furnish the requisite supply of enthusiasm 
for the Navy. What the world is likely to 
see is a slow and steady decline of United 
vStates naval power based upon the preach- 
ing of the peace party. Perhaps some twen- 
ty years hence America will perceive with 
a shock that her pretensions are so infinite- 
ly greater than her powers on the sea that 
the Monroe Doctrine itself will not, indeed, 
be abandoned, but permitted to assume some 
new aspect. For what Mr. Roosevelt once 
told his countrymen must never be forgot- 
ten — the Monroe Doctrine will last as long 
as the United States can make it good in 
the face of a challenge, but it will not last 
very much longer. The decline of America 
in naval power shows us where the Monroe 
Doctrine is going. 



MACHINERY ON SHIPBOARD. 



Much interest was manifested yesterday 
in the Swedish steamship Vollrath Tham, 
which is docked at pier 13, Port Richmond, 
and which is said to be unique. It is the 
only steamship of its kind that ever docked 
here. 

It is equipped with an electric outfit for 
discharging cargo, having ten traveling 
cranes and shoveling apparatus, which un- 
load the vessel more expeditiously than can 
be done by men. Only fifteen persons are 
required to operate the machinery, by which 
they can unload the steamship of a full car- 
go in less than twenty-four hours. Under 
ordinary circumstances it would require 
about 100 men to do the work is not less 
than two days. 

Port Richmond stevedores, who expected 



to find employment on the vessel when she 
arrived, did not find much to praise in her 
equipment when they saw how smoothly 
and quickly the work of unloading the ves- 
sel was being done. 

The Vollrath Tham brought a cargo of 
7600 tons of iron ore from Narvik for the 
Reading Iron Company. She was built last 
spring by the Hawthorn-Leslie Company at 
Newcastle, Eng., under the supervision of 
John Johnson of Gothenburg, Sweden. She 
is owned by railroad and mining interests in 
Sweden. She cost about $350,000. 

This is the third voyage of the Vollrath 
Tham. The first was to Emden and the 
second to Oxelsund. She is 390 feet long, 
56^ feet wide and 24.10 feet deep. She 
is constructed entirely of steel and carries 
three electric dynamos, one of which is used 
for illuminating purposes. Her crew num- 
bers thirty-eight men. Erik Strom is the 
captain. The vessel will remain here about 
a week, sailing with a cargo of coal and 
machinery. — Philadelphia Ledger. 



WHAT IS A KNOT? 



Before the days of patent logs the speed 
of a vessel was taken by means of the 
"chip" or triangular log and a sand glass. 
This log consisted of a triangular piece of 
wood attached in a certain manner to a line. 
The log was dropped overboard, a certain 
length of line was allowed to run out, the 
log itself remaining stationary in the water, 
until it was well clear of the ship. In the 
line a number of knots were tied at definite 
points and the line was allowed to run out 
through the hands of the person operating 
it. 

When the first knot was reached the 
operator gave the word, and another one 
turned the sand glass; the line continued 
td run out, and the operator counted the 
number of knots in the line which passed 
through his hand during the time the sand 
was running. The sand glass might be a 
minute or half-minute glass, which is im- 
material, but in the result the person who 
was checking the speed of the ship by the 
log line would report so many "knots." 

This, to the master or navigator, would 
imply that so many knots, as marked on the 
log line had run out during the time repre- 
sented by the glass, and a simple calcula- 
tion would convert this from "knots per 
sand glass" to "nautical miles per hour." 
Hence it will be seen that the term "knot," 
as originally applied, was essentially a speed 
term and not one of distance. — G. L. Mark- 
ham, R. N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anton Jacobsen, a native of Stavanger, 
Norway, is inquired for by his brother, John 
Jacobsen. Address, Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union, Mobile, Ala. 



The Australian Government has ordered 
six dirigible balloons and six aeroplanes in 
Europe for experimental purposes. 



Demand the Hatters' label when buying a 



hat. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, l]/i 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Marine P'iremen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 85 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San F"rancisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seaiwen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverbaiid Seemannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 

Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

Denmark. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeeniansbond, 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 

Fedcrazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 

Austria. 

Verband dcr Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buqucs V pnerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, I (Bar- 
ccloneta) Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Rcsistcncia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 
Leg:x Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvetto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



Mcll)Ourne (Australia) printers are 
going to appoint an organizer at £200 
a year and expenses. 

The poll taken at Gladstone, Aus- 
tralia, recently, to change the weekly 
half-holiday from Thursday to Sat- 
urday, resulted as follows: For Satur- 
day, 157; for Thursday. .32; informal. 
2. 

The Sydney (Australia) Rockchop- 
pers' Union has advised the men not 
to work at the Water and Sewerage 
Boards' johs at. Willoughby unless 
the rate of 10s. for six hours was 
paid. 

The Sydney (.Australia) Shop .\s- 
sistants' Union is tlistrihuting circu- 
lars broadcast, inviting the public to 
demand to be served oidy by shop as- 
sistants wearing the badge of the 
union. 

I-'ifteen hundred dock laborers at 
Havre. I'rancc. have again declared a 
general strike for higher wages. The 
loading of the steamers La Savoic and 
La Gascogne was completed on Octo- 
ber 2 under police protection. 

The spectacle of a woman breaking 
metal on the roadside may be ob- 
served at Doncaster, .Australia. Dur- 
ing the past month the woman has 
been working assiduously with lur 
husband in all w-ealhers. 

Six thousand lishermen while mak- 
ing a demonstration at Douarney. 
I'Vance, on October 8, in i)ehalf of the 
strike in the sardine industry, came 
into collision with the gendarmes. 
Later they raised a barricade and 
showered stones upon the gendarmes 
and fifteen lishermen were injured. 

A statement of claims in respect to 
the dispute as to the wages and condi- 
tions of labor between the Australian 
boot trade employers' federation and a 
number of employers in Victoria, New 
South Wales, South Australia and 
Queensland, 1ias been filed in the of- 
fice of the Commonwealth Court of 
Conciliation and Arbitration. 

The jockeys who were in attendance 
at the Victoria Park (N.S.W.) race 
course recently went on strike and re- 
fused to ride. The strike was against 
a rule adopted by the associated clubs. 
The difificulty, however, was settled 
by the club officials promising to re- 
consider the rule, to which exception 
was taken by the lads. 

Under a threat of a general strike of 
the miners of Great Britain the Scot- 
tish coal dispute has been settled, a 
minimum wage of 6s. a day having 
been conceded for the next three 
years, and an undertaking having been 
given by the coal barons that suitable 
machinery will be devised to cope with 
an increased output as trade increas- 
es. 

The Australian Federal Treasurer 
estimates that for 1909-10 the sugar 
production will be 145,511 tons by 
white, and 15.742 by black labor, mak- 
ing a total of 161,25,3 tons. The 
amount of bounty estimated to be paid 
is ,£450,000. There was a decrease 
during 1909 of 60 farmers who emidoy 
black labor and an increase of 92 farm- 
ers who employ white labor. 

In union organization Denm;irk 
stands at the head of the class with 
58 per cent of her workers organized; 
Sweden has 33 per cent; I-'inland. 29 
per cent; Hungary, 28 per cent; Fng- 
laiid, 22 per cent; and Italy only 8 per 
cent. In absolute membership Ger- 
many stands at the head, with 2.446.489 
in the various unions, mechanical and 
agricultural. English unions have a 
membership nf 2.106.283. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE, 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LIPPM AN BROS. 

S3 2 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next to Fritz & Ernett 
SAN PEDRO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Union Goods for Union Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to Inspect our 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. B RO WIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET, 
I carry a fuU line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you wanL The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 60 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Looirf labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 



Fourth Street, 
Between Front and Beacon 
SAN PEDRO. 



Sts., 



W ALK-OV ER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



JACOB OL-SE^N san pedro news co. 



Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 



Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 



Dealers In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 



-„«... ^ ^^„^^^ ^ ^ ^^^ _. .^^ „ ^ Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran 
FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front clsco Papers on Sale. 

of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. . . „ w o. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. M UN SON 

Dealer in 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




Named shoes are frequently made In Non- 
Union factories. 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what Its name, unless It bears a 
plain and readable Impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP are 
always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence of 
the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chaa, L. Baine. Sec.-Treas. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Samuel England, age 48 years, com- 
municate with Seamen's Institute, 242 
Steuart street, San Francisco. 



James Sample, last heard of on ship 
Santa Rita in April, 1909, is inquired 
for by Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart 
street. 



CjBfiBusrtu 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S 





San Pedro Letter List. 

Andersen, -lOa.'i. l.nfinaii, K. 

A lull I sen, Peter I". Lehtonen, .lulin 

.\ lander, K. Lund, If. K. 

.M)l>iirs. Arno Lano, Kmll 

Albertsen. Johannes Lerch. Paul 

Andersen, Einur Maguire. Thunias 

Andersson, Axel McKenzle, James 

.■\innel, Albert Murie. Martin 

niiihtinan. F. Mellin, Edward 

r.iMlsen. Axel M.vsind, \V. F. 

Hiose, R. Mesak. Edward 

Jiehrens, E. A. Neullng, All)ert 

Ho.vlan, Chris. J. Nielsen, Sveiul 

Hielila. Th. -lltSS Nordman, John I>. 

Hower, Gosta Osses. A. 

UroKard, Nils Olsen, Th. 

Coiiistedt, Ernst Olsen, O. -5.'?7 

Carlsson, C. Oilman. Cus 
Cliristiansen. HaroldOtto, John 
Christiansen, G.-1054Oseses, W. A. 

l>ahll)erg, J. H. Petersen, S. R. 

Kc khardt, W. Peterson. K. E.. -903 

KiiKberg. Oscar Petersen. H. -1064 

Kk. Tliure Peterson. Laurltz 

ICrickson. John Pedersen, Gert C. 

Fay, Joe Pedersen, Alfred 
Knclericksen, Harry Pederson, Ueinhold 

Fisher. -556 Peterson, Hans 

Fiilvik, Carl Rudland, Jakob 

Kliiiiing, John Keed, L. C. 

Kasik', lion Itasmussen. E. 

Gabrielsen, K. -CO! Seott, E. G. (pkK.) 

<:ask, A. .S'hwltzer. H. 

C.iKesen. Rmil San. B. -211.T 

Glauseii. Harry Scarabosia, M. 

("tuenther. Richard Sember^,', J. 

IfcKjjuni. Louis Sorensen, A. 
Hcnnanson, K. -1554Steen, J. C. 

Ilaiisen, Theodor Solie, Ing;vald 

1 1 like. Carl Svenssen, Nikolaus 

llcsse. Erlck Sindahl. J. 

llaKsenmuller. H. Syversen, Ole 

Hansen. Peter K. Stalsten, Karl 

Haarklau, I. Sandstroni. J. -1347 

Hansen. Carl Strahle, Charles 
lleinanen, C. (pkg.)Southerland, A. 

Johansen, C. -1191 Svendsen. (;. -1050 

Johan.son, J. -880 Swanson, Charles 

Jorffensen, E. Tommis. Frank 

Kuline, W. Tufvesson, J. 

Kmh. Carl Trepetket. Frank 

Keiiianen. Enill 'I'ouanne, Walter 

Klappc, J. Veyvoda. Frank 

Kristiansen. Eigil Quinn, W. 

Kraiishatz, F. Wahrenheit. Otto 

Kari, Matti Wyehgel, J. 

Krohn. J. A. Wahlstedt. R. -778 

Larson. L. Westerlund. T. P. 
Louis. Mickel 




The salvage claim originating 
through the SS. Curacao and SS. 
.Australian has been adjusted. All 
money due the crew who were aboard 
the vessel at the time the Australian 
was assisted will be found in the man- 
ager's office, 112 Market street. Par- 
tics applying for such money will first 
apiily to the head of their respective 
(Up.irtment for identification. The 
names of the men are as follows: I-' 
Mason. .'X. Mondini, R. Nelson, J. 
Jonasen, J. Lorenz. C. Swenson. H. 
N'elsou. F. Rebases. C. Chidley. 

Carl Wilhelm Swensson, a native 
of Kalmar, Sweden, born September 
IS, 1881, supposed to be sailing on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for by 
his sisters and parents. Address, 
Klaes Swensson, Sodra Langgatan 
No. 26, Kalmar, Sweden. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The tug Daniel Kern, which was sunk in the 
Cohimbia River in collision with the steamer 
George W. Elder last August, has been raised and 
towed to Portland to be docked for repairs. 

Seventeen days from Fort Wrangl, the Alaska 
Packers' bark Star of England, arrived at San 
Francisco on October 15 with 77,367 cases of 
salmon, the largest shipment which has reached 
that port this season. 

Rasmus Jepsen was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on October IS as master of 
the steamer Governor, vice H. T. Thomas. The 
barkentine Fullerton was enrolled with T. A. 
Grant master. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 11: Steamer Newport, W. J. Russell, 
vice J. W. Saunders; schooner Jennie and Edna, 
Jacob Conrado vice John Anderson. 

Captain James Tattom, one of the best-known 
seafaring men on the Pacific Coast and a resident 
of Astoria for many years, died at that place on 
October 15 of heart disease after an illness of 
several weeks. He was a native of Maine. He 
came to Astoria in 1877 and had made his home 
there since. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 13: Steamer Henrietta, George Howard 
vice A. Paulssen; steamer Herald, Enos Fouratt, 
Jr., vice George Fouratt; steamer Northland, E. 
Erickson vice G. M. Fagerlend. The steamer 
.\lcatraz, B. J. Lee master, was enrolled. 

The new steam-schooner Klamath, recently 
launched at Eureka and said to be the finest of 
her type on the Coast run, left Eureka on October 
10 for San Francisco. The Klamath will have 
machinery installed at Oakland and will be under 
charter by Charles R. McCormick and will be 
placed on the Eureka run as a lumber carrier. 

The Life-Saving station at Waddah Island, by 
reason of excessive storms and heavy seas, which 
destroyed part of the Government property at 
that point, is now being moved from this ex- 
posed point to the mainland surrounding Neah 
Bay, which is far more sheltered. The crew of 
the Life-Saving station are busy constructing a 
new station and expect to move in by tlic first 
of the year. 

News of heavy raids on the seal rookeries in 
Alaska was brought to Victoria, B. C, on October 
12 by the United States Survey steamer McAr- 
thur, which has completed her season's work in 
in the north. At Day's Harbor, between Valdez 
and Seward, nearly 200 carcasses from which the 
skins had been torn were found. Other evidence 
was found indicating that a Japanese sealing 
schooner had landed' men at that point. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom Jiouse on 
October 14: Steamer Sea Prince, Oscar L. Thorn- 
sen, vice Patrick Collins; steamer Santa Rita, Ar- 
thur B. Conner, vice Lewis A. Fielder; steamer 
Millie, Peter Baum, vice William Gustafsen. The 
steamer W. S. Porter, G. B. Macdonald, master, 
and the schooner Santa Paula, A. Peller, master, 
were enrolled and the barkentine Gleaner, A. W. 
Hall, master, was registered. 

Advices have been received at San Francisco to 
. the effect that navigation on the Tanana River, 
Alaska, was closed on October 10 by freezing 
of the ice. The freeze was entirely unexpected, 
artd is extremely early. Two river steamers, with 
crowds of stampeders, bound for the scene of the 
reported rich strikes in the Iditarad district, were 
caught in the ice. The steamers are frozen a few 
miles out of Fairbanks, and have on board con- 
siderable merchandise and foodstufifs for the new 
mining district. 

The following changes of masters were recorded 
at the San Francisco Custom-house on October 4: 
Steamer Hercules, C. C. Titchworth, vice D. C. 
"1 Thomas; steamer U. S. Grant, A. R. Paulsen, vice 
John Campbell; steamer Leader, George H. Me- 
lone, vice Donald Kennedy; steamer Blossom No. 
2, N. F. Buckingham, vice R. L. Holman; schooner 
Redwood City, John Shand, vice Charles Her- 
l-ichy. The schooner Fearless, C. W. Liljequist 



master, and the steamer Riverside, J. Ramselius 
master, were enrolled. 

A new wireless record has been established by 
Sergeant Albert L. Jefferson, operator on the 
United States Army transport Sheridan, which 
arrived at San Francisco on October 9, two days 
fifteen hours and thirty-six minutes from Seattle. 
Jefferson reports that while crossing between 
Nagasaki and the Hawaiian Islands he picked up 
the North Head station at Washington, a dis- 
tance of 3500 miles, and kept in constant com- 
munication with that station and the one at Cape 
Blanco from that time. 

Eleven vessels are awaiting repairs and over- 
hauling at the Union Iron Works, San Francisco, 
and the various departments of the big shipbuild- 
ing yards, with the exception of the sailmaking 
department, have as much work as they can 
handle. Several steam-schooners are also wait- 
ing to register for positions on the drydock, and 
it will be necessary for them to wait a couple of 
weeks before it will be open for them. The 
channel docks of the works are also crowded 
with vessels undergoing repairs. 

The rendezvous of revenue-cutters in Seattle 
harbor during the winter is provided against in 
a recent order of Captain Worth Ross, chief of 
the service. He was in Seattle last spring while 
the cutters were preparing for their northern 
cruise, and evidently decided there were too many 
in one spot. This winter only the Tahoma will 
winter in Elliott Bay. The Snohomish will be at 
Neah Bay, the Thetis at Honolulu, the Manning 
at .\storia, the Rush at Juneau, the Areata at Port 
Townsend, the Perry at San Pedro, the Bear at 
San Diego and the McCulloch at San Francisco. 
Collector of the Port Stratton, of San Fran- 
cisco, has been advised by Assistant Secretary 
McHarg to remit the penalty of $2070 assessed 
against the British bark Simla, which was 
wTecked at Acapulco, purchased by the Merchants 
and Owners' Tugboat Association and towed to 
San Francisco by the tug Hercules. She was 
classed as an undocumented vessel, but in his 
authorization the Assistant Secretary stated it 
was the policy of the Department to encourage 
the purchase of wrecks to be rebuilt at American 
shipyards, where, as in this case, there is evi- 
dently no fraud attempted. 

After an unsuccessful search for the steamer 
Brother Jonathan, which was lost fifty years ago 
off Crescent City and partly successful work on 
the steamer Queen Christine, which was wrecked 
two years ago near the same place, the wrecking 
steamer Greenwood of the Whitelaw Wrecking 
Company returned to San Francisco on October 
3. No trace of the Brother Jonathan was found. 
The Queen Christine was located under water five 
miles from Crescent City. Her bow had broken 
off and is swung to one side of the rest of the 
hull. Captain Whitelaw expects to continue his 
work on this steamer next summer. 

The admiralty suits of pilots N. Jordan and 
M. Anderson against the steamers Queen and 
Umatilla, respectively, were argued before United' 
States District Judge De Haven at San Francisco 
on October IS and sulimitted. The pilots suetl 
for their fees for pilotage amounting approxi^ 
mately to $105 each, the Pacific Coast Steartisliii') 
Company as owner of the vessels contending it 
should not pay, as the Queen and Umatilla were 
engaged in coastwise trade. The pilots support 
their claim on the contention that the steamers 
made Victoria, a foreign port, a port of call, and 
hence did not come directly from a domestic port. 



To Mariners: You will please take notice that 
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 
has installed and is maintaining between San 
Pedro and Terminal Island, one (1) subaqueous 
telephone and telegraph cable, 750 feet in length. 
That at said points said company will maintain 
monuments indicating the place where said cable 
lies. Do not drop anchor at these points. San 
Pedro, Cal., December, 1907. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1V4A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass., IVzA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELI'HIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 50 Union St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 213 Banks Ave. 
BAY -CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 305 French St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 63 East Kinzie St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

'. Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit SL 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water SL 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., .?17 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - Jl.OO 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspoHdents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice aa second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 20. 1909. 



HENEY FOR THE PEOPLE. 



The main is.suc in tiie political canipaii^n now 
in progress in San I'Vancisco is that of the 
graft ])rosccution. The two candidates for 
District Attorney take opposite sides u])on 
that issue. Francis J. Heney stands for the 
continuance of the prosecution. Ilis oppo- 
nent, Charles M. Fickert, stands for the dis- 
continuance of the prosecution. Of course, 
Mr. Fickert does not avow his policy in so 
many words; he favors the prosecution of all 
offenders, provided it shall appear to him that 
there exists a "sufficiency of evidence to con- 
vict." However, all the circumstances of Mr. 
Fickert's nomination, combined with the gen- 
eral character of his support, leave no room to 
doubt that, if elected, he will quash the prose- 
cution as expeditiously as decency permits, 
and probably more so. 

If the issue of the graft prosecution in- 
volved only the disposition of the charges af- 
fecting the "higher ups" and "lower downs," 
the Journal might safely content itself with 
a policy of "non-interference in politics." Tf 
the issue were political in any real sense this 
paper, following the rule of its whole exist- 
ence, would take no part in the discussion. 
But the issue is not limited to its effects upon 
those charged with crime, nor is it merely a 
political question. The outcome of the issue 
will affect the whole community, and especially 
that part of it which is commonly described as 
the "labor element." In a word, the interests 
of labor are involved in the contest for Dis- 
trict Attorney equally with the interests of 
any other element or class, including those of 
the "higher ups" themselves, and more so 
than in any other feature of the general cam- 
paign. So regarded, the issue is one that a 
labor paper can not ignore without laying 
itself open to the suspicion, either of indiffer- 
ence to the interests of its readers or of a 
mistaken conception of the issue itself. 

Stated in general terms, the election will 
determine whether or not San Francisco is 
honest enough and strong enough to hold a 
public-service corporation amenable to the law 
against bribery, or at least whether or not that 



city is willing to keep up a fight for that pur- 
pose. Should the election determine this 
problem in the negative the city will stand con- 
victed of complicity in its own undoing, and 
the corporations will stand triumphant over 
the law and the people. Once established in 
this position, it is not difficult to foresee the 
fate of the people, and in that fate the "labor 
element" will be the chief sufferers. In the 
more restricted .sense the election will deter- 
mine whether the District Attorney of San 
Francisco shall be the servant of the public 
or of the corporations, whether he shall i)rose- 
cute all persons charged with crime or only- 
such persons as the corporations wish prose- 
cuted. In other words, the election will deter- 
mine whether a pul)lic-service corporation offi- 
cial charged with crime shall be prosecuted by 
an officer chosen by and representative of the 
public, or by an officer chosen by and repre- 
sentative of the public-service corporations. 

In this situation we do not hesitate to say that 
the interests of labor are identical with the in- 
terests of the people, and that the interests of 
the people lie in the election of Francis J. 
Heney. We feel that we would be false to 
our trust were we to say less than this. As 
to the charges made against Heney — his char- 
acter, methods, motives, etc. — we care nothing 
for these. We do not support Heney upon 
any personal grounds, neither will we oppose 
him upon such grounds. We support Heney, 
not for his own sake, but for the sake of the 
principle which he represents, i. e., the principle 
that the richest and most powerful offender 
must be prosecuted equally with the poorest 
and weakest offender, the principle of equality 
before the law. This principle must be vin- 
dicated, not only to insure respect for the law 
upon the part of the representatives of "big 
business" but also to in.sure re.spect for the 
law upon the part of the public generally. 
A system of law that is too weak to punish 
the powerful is too weak to defend the poor. 
Such a system is merely a system of discrim- 
ination ; it is in reality a system of anarchy 
rather than of law. Under such a system 
labor would be the chief sufferer. 

We support I*>ancis J. Heney because he 
represents the people's interests, labor's inter- 
ests, our interests, in the present campaign. 
The present issue settled, and settled right, we 
will turn our attention to whatever other issues 
may arise, when they arise, and take our 
chances in the outcome, just as we always have 
done and as we always must do. One issue 
at a time ! 



Warships representing five foreign nations. 
Great Britain, Germany, Italy, The Nether- 
lands, and Japan, are now in San Francisco 
Bay, as participants in the Portola Festival. 
The presence of these craft is a compliment to 
the city and a mark of the world's appreciation 
of the marvelous work of reconstruction that 
has been performed during the past three 
years. San Francisco is a place well worth 
coming a long way to see. We hope our 
comrades of the world's greatest naval powers 
will see it all and carry away with them a feel- 
ing as good as that with which we greet them. 



A visit to the Labor Carnival in San Fran- 
cisco during the present week will repay the 
visitor in pleasure, and besides will aid a 
good cause. Location, Central Park, Eighth 
and Market streets. 



The union label is Labor's most effective 
weapon. Demand it at all times. 



RAILROAD COMPETITION, 



The monthly meeting of the Vesselowners and 
Captains' Association was held j'esterday after- 
noon at 111 Walnut street. Captain John L. Nich- 
olson presided. Howard M. Long and L. A. 
Denipsoy were appointed a committee to confer 
with Representative J. Hampton Moore in rela- 
tion to alleged discrimination of railroads against 
sailing vessels at competitive water points. 

One speaker asserted that the railroads charge 
from 25 to 75 per cent less for carrying freight 
where they have competition with sailing vessels 
and that during the last ten years the number of 
schooners and barges has been reduced from 3000 
to 600 owing to this rivalry. 

The foregoing, from the Philadelphia Pub- 
lic Ledger, illustrates a feature of the shipping 
question that has but recently received atten- 
tion from those who discuss that question for 
public consumption. In a recent issue of the 
Journal the views of Mr, Wm. R. Wheeler 
were quoted to the effect that the difficulty 
encountered by American shipping lies not so 
much in the competition on the water as in 
competition on land, i. e., competition by rail- 
roads which run steamship lines as adjuncts of 
the railroad business, thus controlling trans- 
portation by water and dictating terms which 
it is impossible for independent shipping com- 
panies to accept or meet. The situation re- 
ferred to by the Public Ledger exemplifies this 
tendency. Of course, the railroads make 
good their losses, if any, by adding the 25 or 
75 per cent to the charges where there is no 
competition by sailing vessel or otherwi.se. 
Thus the shipper, and ultimately the consumer, 
"pays the freight" either in one way or an- 
other. Whatever be the solution, whether in 
the plan suggested by Mr. Wheeler to pro- 
hibit the ownership of vessels by railroads or 
in any other form of restriction, it is quite 
clear that the argument offered in support of 
Ship Subsidies, namely, that American ships 
can not compete with foreigners, will not hold 
water as against the known facts of railroad 
competition. 



New York, October 2. — The .American Fed- 
eration of Labor, through Vice-President John 
Mitchell, who is also chairman of the trade agree- 
ment department of the National Civic Federation, 
has issued a statement declaring that certain 
steamship lines are bringing undesirable immi- 
grants to this country and suggesting that Ameri- 
can wage earners advocate the incorporation of 
tlie following restrictions in the Immigration laws: 

First, that in addition to the restriction imposed 
by the laws at present in force, the head tax of 
$4, now collected, should be increased to $10. 

Second, that each immigrant, unless he be a po- 
litical refugee, should bring with him not less than 
$25, in addition to the amount required to pay 
transportation, to the point where he expects to 
find employment. 

Third, that immigrants between the ages of 14 
and 50 years should be able to read a section of 
the Constitution of the United States, whether in 
our language, in their own language, or in the 
language of the country from which thej' come. — 
Press Dispatch. 

The foregoing, whether practicable or not 
as a means of dealing with the immigration 
question, affords at least a suggestion worth 
considering. Whatever may be said against 
any attempt to put up the bars, upon the 
ground that there is still plenty of room in the 
countrv for all who wish to come, it remains 
true that the congestion of immigrants in the 
large cities constitutes a problem of municipal 
life that is fast reaching the point of insolubil- 
ity. The suggestions offered by John Mitchell 
may or may not fit the case, but they are sug- 
gestions and as such commend themselves to 
our judgment as against the mere wailings that 
emanate from other quarters and which 
amount to nothing more than so much sound 
and fury. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WORKERS OF THE WORLD. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



Switzerland and Germany, and of the River En- 
gineers and Firemen of Holland. 

"The following have partially stopped work or 
have dissolved: The Federation of Dockers, Sea- 
men and Inland Seamen in Spain (on account of 
severe persecutions and on account of the crisis), 
the Society of Tramway Servants in Oporto (Por- 
tugal) (on account of irregularities of the sec- 
retary), the Society of Tramway Servants in 
Catania (Sicily) (on account of the terrible conse- 
quences of the earthquake), the Confederation of 
Railway Workers in Argentine (on account of 
some lost strikes), the National Organization of 
Railway Workers of Hungaria (on account of dis- 
solution by the Government) and the Society of 
Railwaymen on the Oriental Railways (on account 
of defense by the Young Turkish Government). 
All these organizations were or are still affiliated 
with the International Transport Workers' Fed- 
eration. All told, this means a loss of 10,000 
"members, and we must now set to work to replace 
them. We shall try with new vigor to induce the 
organizations which have still kept apart to imme- 
diately join the international combination of all 
traffic and transportworkers." 

An interesting feature of the Correspondence 
Sheet is an article on the "Traffic and Transport 
Workers in India," by Dr. N. Krishna, of Bom- 
bay, from which we reprint the following: 

"In a country like India you cannot expect a 
strong labor organization, and a political organ- 
ization has been established only a few years ago. 
I shall therefore write a few lines, which may be 
of interest to my German brothers and fellow- 
workers. 

"In India we have about 35,000 miles of railway 
land and most of it either belongs to the State or 
is under the control of the State. The railway- 
men of India have not the right to strike, but they 
go on strike all the same. During the last five 
years there have been three or four strikes of 
some importance and in each case the railway- 
men secured at least something. In India there 
is no other combination of railwaymen, but I am 
glad to say there will be one soon (at present 
there is a secret one). The relation of the serv- 
ants toward the masters or toward the Govern- 
ment is not a good one, as most everybody in 
India hates the English Government. You must 
remember that the Government has the support of 
the army at any time and at any place. You must 
also remember another thing about your brothers, 
the Indian Railwaymen, and that is that the offi- 
cials have the absolute control. The officials en- 
gage any number of men at any time they see fit 
and they also discharge any man or any number 
of men as it pleases them. As to the conditions 
of engagement, there are none at all. The Rail- 
waymen, who are not Englishmen, get from 60 
to 120 marks a month and their hours of work 
vary between 10 and 12 a day, free Sundays or 
one day ofif a week and on most of the national 
holidays. In case of sickness, accidents, etc., the 
railwaymen can not expect a penny and surely 
there are no rent allowances of any kind for the 
Indians, but in case of an Englishman there is 
everything he can desire for the betterment of 
the working class of to-day. It is needless for me 
to say that the Government is using every effort 
to secure legislation of a still harder nature against 
the Indians. Things in Europe are quite different 
to what they are in India for the Hindoos and 
Indians. In Europe you have one master, in In- 
dia they have two masters, the first master is the 
luiglish Government and the second master the 
Indian princes and the economy maste.s. There- 
fore everything is in India not one-tenth as good 
as it is in Europe, and yet I see no difference to 
any extent except your wonderful organizations. 
^'ou must also bear in mind that the English 
Government in India is not there just for fun or to 
be kind to the Indians. The Englishmen are in 
India, because they get more than 130 million 
pounds yearly and that is all the English Govern- 
ment cares for and that is all they are in In- 
dia for. 

"The street railway in India is a new thing in 
one way, although it was started in India some 
30 or 35 years ago. There are not many miles of 
street railways in India. Every large city in In- 
dia and a few large towns has street railways. 
The street railways are in the hands of private 
concerns in India. I am glad to say that the 
street railway servants have an organization, but 
unfortunately it is not a national one. Each city 
has its own organization and so far they have 
more or less gained by the few strikes which have 
been undertaken during the last few years. Most 
of the organizations are recognized by the mas- 
ters of the street railways. 

"The worktime varies in India as a rule between 
10 to 12 hours a day in every trade and free Sun- 
days, in case they have no free Sundays they get 
four days off a month or one day off a week. 
The wage of the street railwaymen varies between 
40 and 55 marks a month, they also have a small 
allowance for clothes and they generally have an 
agreement fixing term of notice and payment. 
There is no insurance of any kind, but a small 
allowance is granted in case of disability. At the 
end of each line waiting halls are provided for, 
in short, the Indian street railwaymen are perhaps 



better organized and better paid than many other 
trades except the railwaymen. 

"Until about 10 or 15 years ago, the carriage 
or cart was owned by the one who drove it and 
whatever he made was his own money after he 
had paid the city or town government about 12 
to 18 marks a year. Nobody pays and nobody 
paid in the country if one has a carriage or a 
cart or both of them or any number of them. 
But now the things have changed. In all the large 
towns and in every city the carriages are owned 
by a few men, eight hours constitute a day's work 
and the driver may work the next eight hours if 
he wants or if he can. His income as a rule is 
just a little over 60 marks a month in case he 
works just eight hours a day. If he works longer 
his income will be more and it may get as much 
as 125 to 130 marks a month. As to the carts, 
however, there is still a large number of men who 
own them, about 30 or 35 per cent of the carts are 
owned by the men who drive them. In some cases 
these men make more money than the drivers of 
the passengers and in other cases these men make 
much less. The worktime is not less than 12 
hours a day and often as much as 14 to 15 hours a 
day. Let me say here that of all the workers of 
India the cart drivers are the best liked, because 
they always sing some funny songs or will make 
some jokes on somebody while driving the cart. 

"The carriage drivers have some sort of an or- 
ganization, but the cart drivers have none. 

"It is useless for me to speak about insurance, 
disability, sickness, -deposits and benefit institu- 
tions, as there is nothing of the kind in India in 
any trade or in any line of work, but I am in the 
hope that before I die all of these and every one 
of these institutions will exist. I may also say 
here that in every trade one has as a rule from 
30 to 75 days of rest a year. 

"I see just now that I have made a mistake by 
saying that the cart drivers of India are full of 
fun as that is not the case, as a matter of fact the 
dock workers are the men who laugh and make 
fun all the time and I can tell you that no class 
of men in any part of the world are as jolly as 
the Indian dockers. The dockers of Bombay, as 
anywhere in India, have, next to the mill hands, 
the stfongest organization in India, but an outsider 
knows nothing about it as nobody but a docker 
alone knows it. You must remember that India 
has no freedom of any kind and everything that 
the workingmen undertake must therefore be done 
in closed rooms until a few more years will have 
elapsed. 

"The rivers of India are not opened by the Eng- 
lish Government, but if they do so it will again be 
in the interest of the English masters as most of 
the seamen are English and they have their own 
organization. To speak of the few Indian sea- 
men is unjust because they are too few to be 
mentioned. 

"Now let me give you some information about 
your brothers and sisters in India which may be 
of interest to you. 

"1. The Indian pays more than 65 per cent of 
his income in taxes to the English Government. 

"2. One hundred millions of people in India 
can not get to drink rice soup once a day. 

"3. A few years ago as many as about six mil- 
lions died of hunger during a single year. 

"4. At present more than two million Indians 
die of hunger and starvation. 

"5. More than one and a half million of people 
in India die of plague and pest every year and 
most of them are children below the age of 12 
and 15. 

"6. There is not one school to every 14 or 15 
miles in India. 

"7. Not one working man out of 500 to 1000 
can send one of his children to the school. 

"8. The Indians have no liberty or freedom of 
any kind. 

"9. The yearly income at present of the Indians 
per head is just 40 marks. 

"10. England takes from India every year more 
than 120 to 130 million pounds. 

"Such, my comrades and friends, is the life in 
India. Remember, the Indians die of hunger not 
because they produce little, it is just the other way. 
The Indians produce too much, but the English 
robbers take it away and the result is that nothing 
is left for the Indians." 



STREET-CAR PROFITS IN LEEDS. 



According to a newspaper report concern- 
ing the working of the street railways of 
Leeds, England, under municipal manage- 
ment in 1908, the cor])oration committee re- 
ceived and passed the accounts, which 
showed a surplus of $2.S0,900, of which $19,- 
466 was ])ut down as reserve fund, and the 
balance, $23L434, went to the relief of the 
rates. The gross profits amounted to $796,- 
534. The amount carried to appropriation 
account as net revenue for the year was 
$586,992, from which $240,288 was deducted 
for sinking-fund contributions and $L35.804 
for permanent renewals, leaving the suri)lus 
above given. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, October 18, 1909. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7:30 p. m., E. Ellison, presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping medium. Balloting for dele- 
gates to the International Seamen's Convention 
was proceeded with and will be concluded at tht 
next meeting. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St., Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 11, 1909. 

General situation unchanged. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 11, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 11, 1909. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 11, 1909. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229'/2 Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 11, 1909. 
Shipping slack; prospects fair. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 62. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Oct. 11, 1909. 
Shipping good; prospects uncertain. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 9, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 11, 1909. 
Shipping slacking up some; prospects uncertain. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 5, 1909. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 14, 1909. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slow. Nominations were made 
for delegate to the New York Convention of the 
International Seamen's Union of America. The 
second instalment of the International Assess- 
ment for the benefit of the Marine Unions in the 
Great Lake District was ordered forwarded to the 
International Secretary. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, October 7, 1909. 
Shipping slack. Some of the steamers are lay- 
ing up. Nominated officers for the ensuing term. 
LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, October 4, 1909. 
Shipping medium. Prospects uncertain. Nom- 
inated officers for the ensuing term. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Oct. 11, 1909. 
Situation good. 

ALEX. McKECHNIE, Acting Secretary. 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 11, 1909. 
Shipping medium. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
IJ/^.A. Lewis St. 

DIED. 

Ott-. Lahr, No. 1058, a native of Germany, aged 
40, drowned from the schooner A. M. Baxter, at 
sea, on Sept. 25, 1909. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contribuled by the Lake Seamen's Unioni.) 



#^>&l 



"WELFARE" PLAN EXPOSED. 



V. A. Olander, cliairnian of the Lake Dis- 
trict Grievance Committee of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's I'nion of America, drove 
home some starthng facts in connection 
with the Lake Carriers' so-called "Welfare" 
plan, at a mass meeting held in the Labor 
Temple on Wednesday evening. The meet- 
ing had been intended to be more for benefit 
of the general public than for union men, 
but people did not seem to grasp the im- 
portance of the aflfair and outside of the 
many Lakemen there were only a small 
number of citizens in attendance. This 
proved somewhat of a disa])pointment to 
botli Mr. Liebold, cliairman of the meeting, 
and Mr. Olander. 

The speaker had stocked up a big su])ply 
of facts to give to the people of Erie, and 
it had been his desire that a great many 
would be present so that he could give the 
])ublio the union's side of tlie ])resent figlU 
on the Great Lakes. 

"I am sorry that there are so few citizens, 
outside the Lake seamen, present this eve- 
ning," said Mr. ( )lander. "Jt is hardly 
necessar}' for me to review in detail the 
causes which led up to the fight which is 
now being waged between the Lake Car- 
riers' Association and the Seamen's, Fire- 
men's, Engineers' and Cooks' unions. Most 
of you present here are entirely familiar 
with every detail of it. However, for the 
benefit of tho.se of \'ou who are not acquaint- 
ed with the true details, I will say I have 
in my possession documentary evidence 
against the Lake Carriers' .As.sociation that 
is indisputable that the one and only ob- 
ject of its 'Open Shop' plan is to wipe out 
of existence every union of workingmen on 
the Great Lakes. There is jx)sitively no 
other object, save the final results that go 
with it — starvation wages, long hours and 
unendurable conditions." 
. Mr. Olander was prepared to back every 
statement he made. He was armed with 
copies of letters sent out by the Lake Car- 
riers' .Association to the masters of vessels 
in which they were given positive orders 
not to allow a man to ship on one of their 
vessels who was in possession of a union 
card. 

"On April 9, 1908," continued Mr. Olan- 
der, "before the opening of navigation, the 
Lake Carriers adopted a resolution declar- 
ing for something they called 'Open Shop 
policy,' at the same time specifically staling 
through the public press that 'no discrimina- 
tion' was to be practiced against anyone. 

"To this the unions replied, through pub- 
lic statem'ents of <!iitr •"ofKcers, that as the 
unions were open to all seamen we feared 
no system regardless of the name, under 
which we were not to be discriminated 
against. It was the purpose of our unions 
to give the Lake Carriers a chance to prove 
what their 'Open Shop policy' really was. 

"Our members went to work as fast as 
the ships went into commission (this seemed 
surprising to a great many people, who had 
confidently expected a strike), they left 
their homes, (juitting jobs they had held 
during the winter, and m many cases paying 
railroad fares to get to their ships. The 



vesselowners, however, did not propose to 
let the union men work in peace, but no 
warning was given of what was coming. 

"On May 14, 1908, it was announced that 
thereafter no men would be permitted to 
ship upon Association vessels except through 
the Lake Carriers' shipping offices. This 
system was scarcely started before persecu- 
tion (I use the word advisedly) of union 
men was inaugurated. 

"About June 9, 1908, the captains of the 
Pittsburg Steamship Company began to dis- 
charge their crews, stating they had received 
orrlers to do so, for no reason than that 
the men declined to actually hand over their 
membership books to the captain and agree 
to quit the union. It was. a deliberate lock- 
out of the unicm men for the ])urpose of com- 
jielling them to surrender their right to re- 
main members of a lai)or organization. 

"This spring, 1909, the Lake Carriers' 
Association again declined to meet represent- 
atives of the unit)ns, and inaugurated the 
merciless continuous discharge book sys- 
tem under the name of 'Welfare" plan. 
Each seaman, upon payment of $1.00 to the 
Lake Carriers' Association, receives a. dis- 
charge book which he must retain in order 
to secure employment. This book he must 
deposit with the master of the ship, and 
upon quitting the vessel it may be returned 
to the seaman with the entry 'good,' or 
'fair,' (the captain's opinion of him) in the 
column provided for such marks. 

"l'>y this system the seaman is to be held 
in constant fear of an adverse opinion being 
rendered against him by any captain he 
serves under. If he desires to quit when the 
captain does not want him to he must hesi- 
tate — terror of being deprived of the book 
is relied u])on to bind him to the ship. He 
must not dare resent ill treatment — he must 
not com])lain — under constant expionage he 
must li\'e in fear, always in dread of the 
fatal mark. The continuous discharge book 
system is far more cruel than any ordinary 
blacklist. The particular .system chosen by 
the Lake Carriers is the most outrageous 
of any we have ever heard of. Might is to 
be made right. Fear is to be law. If the 
continuous discharge book system is suc- 
cessfully established on the Great Lakes, 
the native or naturalized seaman will soon 
be a thing of the past. Lhiion or non-union, 
they will leave. American manhood cannot 
exist under it." 

-Mr. Olander was enthusiastically ai)])laud- 
ed at various times, and after the open 
meeting requested all who were not con- 
nected with the Lake Seamen's unions to 
leave the hall, as he wished to speak ])ri- 
vately with the men. 1 le left for the West 
the .same evening. — Union Labor Journal. 
Erie, Pa. 



The Duluth Board of Inspectors of Steam 
\ essels has suspended the license of Jose]jli 
Waterman, who three weeks ago was chief 
engineer of the steamer Sonora of the Tom- 
lin.son fleet, for thirty days. He was charged 
with having left the steamer without a li- 
censed engineer on ))oard, and the charges 
were preferred by G. A. Tomlinson, owner 
of the boat. 



MITCHELL'S "OPEN SHOP." 



"Maritime Union I'.uiletin" is the name of 
a paper that has l)een established in Chicago 
for the purpose of giving publicity to the 
facts relating to the strike on the Great 
Lakes. The second number of the Bulletin, 
just to hand, is of exceptional interest to the 
people of Cleveland, as it contains a fac- 
simile typewritten letter bearing the signa- 
ture of John Mitchell, a large ve.sselowner 
of Cleveland, which was sent to captains o( 
ships and which is illuminating in reference 
to what these magnates of the Lake Car- 
riers* .Association, who have repeatedly de- 
clared that their .so-called "\\'elfare" plan, 
or "Open Shop" movement is not a war up- 
on trade-unions. .Addressing the cajjtains, 
Mr. Mitchell's letter reads: 
Dear Sir: — 

I enclose you herewith copy of a letter 
from the Lake Carriers' Association, giving 
list of the shipping masters' offices at the 
difYerent ports. When you are in need of 
anyone be sure to ship what men you need 
through the shipi)ing offices. WIIE.V YOU 
FIXD THAT YOU 1IA\E A.\Y UNION 
SAILORS ABOARD WHO HA\E 
BOOKS, YOU DISCHARGE THEM UN- 
LESS THEY GIVE UP THEIR BOOKS. 
WHAT V\^E WANT TO DO IS TO RE- 
LIEVE OUR SHIPS OF UNION MEN. 
Be sure to let no walking delegate go aboard 
yoiir boat at any time under any circum- 
stances. Keep a man at the head of the 
ladder when in port, and when a man tries 
to get aboard your boat, ask him his name 
and what he wishes, and if he can not give 
you a satisfactory answer, do not let him 
aboard. 

If I find that any ilelegates get aboard 
your boat. 1 am to ask for your resignation, 
unless you have a very good reason. 
Yours very truly, 

JOHN Mrn iiici.i.. 



MAKE BRAVE FIGHT. 



There is keen vexation and gnashing of 
teeth among the members of the Lake Car- 
riers' As.sociation — the shipowners of the 
Great Lakes' .section of this country — for, 
lo! the 10.000 strikers of the International 
Seamen's I'nion of .America, who went out 
in May last, show no signs at this date of 
weakening, though it was confidently ])re- 
dicted by the bosses that the strike would 
be over before June I. Tricks new and 
old have been tried to "l)ust" this powerful 
union, which is connected with all the mari- 
time unions of the world. .A few of these 
tricks were the institution of the "0])en 
Shop" — "closed to union men" : the impor- 
tation of strikebreakers from foreign coun- 
tries, and the .so-called "Welfare i)lan." which 
the men style the "Hell fare" plan. The 
strikers are confident of victory. They can- 
not, they say, work under such conditions 
of Open Shop, undermanning of ships, long 
hours and short pay. — .Michigan L'nion .\«l- 
vocate. 



The Reed Wrecking Company has suc- 
ceeded in raising the steamer Lackawanna. 
Temporary repairs will be made at Detroit. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SCABS BECOMING SCARCE. 



The strike of the seamen of the Great 
Lakes was 164 days old on Oetol:)cr 11. It 
has cost the vesselowners millions of dol- 
lars in wrecked and damaged vessels, caused 
by mishandHny of vessels by incomjjetent 
scabs and many lives have been sacrificed by 
the same cause. And all without result, all 
wasted. The seamen are to-day just as 
much determined to win as they were on 
May 1. On tlie other hand, scabs are lie- 
coming disgusted and frightened and are 
leaving the Lakes in droves. 

The Lake Carriers' Association lias "])ro- 
curers" out in every State in tlie Lnion, men 
who canvass the rural districts from farm to 
farm, seeking scabs to man the vessels on 
the Lakes. To all such they tell the same 
stor}" : "No strike, 'Open Shop,' l)ut there 
are a lot of Ijums wlio won't work and who 
will try to stop you. Don't talk to them."' 
This is the substance of the lies told Ijy 
Coach and Weeks, detectives, who arc out 
seeking scabs to man these vessels. Each 
scab is forced into the "Welfare" (?) ])]an, 
and iiis dollar is taken awa}' from liini at tiie 
end of the trip. He is registered as a mem- 
ber although in nine cases out of ten he is 
on his way back to the farm l^efore the ink 
is cold on the books. Then the Lake Car- 
riers' President gravely announces through 
the Trust pa])ers tliat over 8000 men are 
now enrolled under the "Welfare" plan. lUit 
he neglects to tell us that about 7000 of tliesc 
men have left the Lakes from time to time. 
And tliey are actually trying to scare us with 
that rot! "Nothing doing." We are on the 
job, and we will be there this time next year 
if necessary to do away will: the seal) 
shipping-master and the "Hell fare" book. 

Conneaut, O. 

W. II. Jenkixs. 



THE FUTURE OF BRAZIL. 



Through the death of Dr. Alfonso I'enna, 
her President, the earlv part of this week 
the greatest of South American republics is 
entering upon the era of a new administra- 
tion. Put the change of governmental con- 
trol arouses no apprehension among the Bra- 
zilians who, through their zeal and patriot- 
ism, have builded a government that is sta- 
ble and secure. 

In the succession of Vice-President Nilo 
Pccanha to the executive chair of the re- 
public the country undoubtedly has a man 
who will devote his every energy to the pro- 
motion of the growth and prosperity of his 
country. The great mass of Brazil's 18,000,- 
000 peoi)le are as ready to follow their new 
President in the jjaths of ])eace as they were 
willing to support former administrations. 

Whether by wise executive advice, or 
through the workings of a beneficent fate, 
lirazil has escaped many of the trials and 
tribulations that have fallen to the lot of her 
sister republic, llcr evolution has not been 
marked by the bloodshed and strife that have 
all but wrecked the less fortunate countries 
that are her neighbors. She has g'one on 
calmly and serenely until she has attained 
commercial relations that are world-wide, 
and has made her importance as a trade cen- 
ter felt in every civilized clime. 

Since the bloodless revolution of 188'^ 
when Brazil became a rei)ublic, her growth 
has been fast and certain. .\t the present 
time she supi)lies more than half the cofi'ee 



that is consumed in the world, while in oth- 
er industries she is forging rapidly into the 
foremost rank. She produces 250,000 tons 
of sugar in a year, 280,000 bales of cotton, 
300,000 bales of tobacco, 26,000 tons of rub- 
ber, 40,000 carats of diamonds, and kills 
2.50,000 head of cattle. These are average 
figures, and they are remarkable, from the 
fact that they represent the productive ca- 
pacity of only a comiiaratively small part 
of the vast country — a country that is larg- 
er in area than the United States. But she 
has other industries, too — gold, coal, prac- 
tically all of the more important minerals, as 
well as silk and woolen mills, that turn out 
thousands of yards of fabric annually. 

Brazil by no means has reached the extent 
of her development. When the thousands of 
s(|uare miles of dense jungle and the unex- 
])lorcd areas along her mighty rivers shall 
have yielded to the touch of civilization and 
the magic of modern machinery, there doubt- 
less will be found riches sufificient to ransom 
a world. Prazil is yet in her infancy as a 
world factor. 

The best wishes of the American ('.o\ern- 
ment and ])eople go out to the great, lusty 
republic of the Southern Continent, and its 
])rogress, resembling in so many respects the 
march of the United States, is followed here 
with friendly interest and s}mpath_v. — 
Washington Post. 



IMPROVED LIFE-PRESERVER. 



.\ new life-preserver has been introduced, 
the invention of j. S. Nowotnick of Ham- 
burg. This de\ice differs very materially 
from the prevalent types of life-preservers, 
and combines several novel and valuable fea- 
tures. It consists of a hollow belt of rubber 
5j4 inches in diameter. The ends consist of 
fiat plates of the same diameter, furnished 
with the requisite attachments, so that the 
belt can be quickly and easily hooked to- 
gether beneath the arms. 

Closely fastened to the ujiper surface of 
the belt is a small metallic cylinder, filled 
with liquid carbon dioxide. On turning a 
taj) the liquefied gas escapes at once into the 
belt, volatizes, and inflates it to its fullest 
capacity, 27^ quarts. The whole operation 
of attaching and inflating the belt requires 
thirty seconds. The buoyancy of such a 
belt is equivalent to fifty-five pounds. 

The advantages of this device over the 
customary Ijelts are twofold. In the first 
jilace the buoyancy of such an inflated belt 
is uniform at all points, so as to allow a per- 
fectly vertical ])osition in water to any per- 
sfMi wearing it. Secondly, its buoyancy far 
surpasses that of the current types, filled 
with cork or reindeer hair. Thus an ordi- 
nary cork belt, weighing eight pounds, sus- 
tains a weight of sixteen pounds. The gas- 
inflated l)elt, weighing only 4.4 jiounds, sus- 
tains a weight of fifty-five pounds. A cork 
belt of the same buoyancy would weigh over 
twenty-six pounds. 

The new ])reser\'er has been shown by re- 
jK^ated demonstration lo be admirably adapt- 
ed for the wants of the average ])erson, su])- 
porting the body so that the head is far 
above the surface of the water. .A type hav- 
ing a diameter of six inches has been devised 
for the use of exceptionally cor])ulent ])er- 
sons. It supjiort a weight of 71^2 pounds. 
It is ])lanncd to make an extended use of 
these rubber life-])rescrvers at seaside re- 
sorts. 



DREDGING ST. LAWRENCE RIVER. 



The Canadian Department of Marine is 
making plans, preparatory to dredging the 
ship channel of the St. Lawrence, in order 
to secure a continuous waterway between 
Montreal and Quebec of at least 35 feet in 
depth, thus insuring a safe passage for 
steamers of the Empress type, draft 
of these vessels now compelling them to dis- 
charge cargo at Quebec. The Government 
dredging plant is now limited to perform 
elifective work at a 30-foot depth. These 
dredges are to be increased to a 35-foot ca- 
pacity, and several new ones will be con- 
structed far exceeding this depth. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frank Donnelly is inquired for by his 
mother, Mrs. Eva Donnelly, 1317 Clark St., 
Racine, Wis. 



Wm. A. Nicholson, No. 13,156, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his sister, Miss 
Alice Nicholson, 356 Lake street, Oak Park, 
111. 



Millard McLeod, No. 22582, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his mother, 
Mrs. D. A. McLeod, Box 475, Sterling, Kan- 
sas. 



Fred Smith, No. 9872, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is wanted by his mother, at Buffalo, 
N. Y. Any one knowing his address please 
communicate with W. L. Smith, 55 Main 
St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Albert Appenyella, sometimes known as 
.\lbert Zcllers, supposed to be a seaman and 
a dredgeman, is inquired for by his sister, 
Anna Goodmiller, 806 E. Wood St., Deca- 
tur, III. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Teleplione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

iVIlLWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, O 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Phone Brll 181)0. 

NORTH TONA WANDA. N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridse Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 21.'! Hanks Avenue 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

HAY CITY, Mich inS F-iftli .X venue 

OOPENSBITRG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ERIE, Pa 305 French Street 

Telephone Bell 682, 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 

HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT. MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELffiF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Escanaba. Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Kte. Marie. Mich. 

Green liay, Mich. Sheboygan, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay. Wis. 

l.udington. Mich. Superior. Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo. O. 



w 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



PRE-EMINENCE OF SAN FRANCISCO. 



The causes which produced the pre- 
eminence of San Francisco arc still in opera- 
tion and can not be set aside. They are 
natural causes, steadily operative throughout 
long periods of time, just as natural causes 
have operated steadily to create and maintain 
great trade centers at Constantinople, Lon- 
don, New York and Chicago. 

Chief of these causes is the fertility of 
California in so many diverse fields of pro- 
duction ; next is its favorable situation for 
trade. .A place may be a great shipping port 
and not be a great city. The bulk of Puget 
Sound's ocean-going foreign commerce is 
handled at Tacoma : but this does not hold 
back Seattle's growth. Great shipping points 
are Sault Ste. Marie, Halifax, Newport 
Xews, Cherbourg, Southampton, but not 
great cities. The bay of San Francisco is the 
natural shipping point for our Pacific trade, 
determined through experience. Such loss 
as it sustains to the Northern ports through 
Alaskan development and their shorter haul 
to the Orient will be approximately offset 
by its greater proximity to the Panama 
Canal. 

What has chiefly made San Francisco is 
the fact that California is an empire in itself. 
Its resources are incredibly varied and abun- 
dant. It is pre-eminent in fruits and wines of 
many sorts. It is twelfth in wheat produc- 
tion. In gold it is second only to Colorado, 
with $16,000,000 a year, and in silver, third 
among the States, with $18,000,000. Over 
125,000,000 gallons of petroleum were 
shipped from San Francisco last year. It 
also has tremendous outputs of lumber, fish, 
wool, live stock and produce. Its inhabitants 
in 1900 were about equal to the combined 
population of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, 
-Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico. 

A few years hence our Pacific Coast will 
include at least four cities of the first class. 
.At San Francisco, let us say, will be the 
New York of the Pacific Coast ; at Seattle its 
Boston ; at Portland its Philadelphia, and at 
Los .'\ngeles its Baltimore. Another group 
of Jersey towns will gather on Puget Sound 
about Tacoma, another Pittsburg will grow 
up at Spokane, another Brooklyn at Oakland. 
It is not necessary to believe that the growth 
of one will impede the development of an- 
other. Business continues to be done and 
population to swarm at all our Atlantic Coast 
cities, notwithstanding the wonderful prog- 
ress of New York. — Indianapolis Star. 



ARBITRATION IN LABOR DISPUTES. 



Consul Frank W. Mahin reports from 
Nottingham that a threateend strike of Lon- 
don and Northwestern Railway employes, 
originating in 1907, has just been settled by 
arbitration, which method is amicably de- 
ciding many serious labor disputes in the 
United Kingdom. Most of the company's 
employes, numbering nearly 40,000 altogether, 
were interested. Both sides of the controversy 
appear satisfied w^th the arbitration. The 
employes gained .some of their demands, re- 
lating particularly to extra pay for overtime 
and Sunday labor and where a man does 
work for more than one day in a higher 
grade than his own. The arbitration is con- 
sidered of far-reaching importance in the 
effect it may have on the interests of em- 
ployes of other railway companies similarly 
situated, 



GREATNESS OF AUSTRALIA. 



.\otwithstanding the undeniable feeling of 
apprehension and unrest, both political and 
financial, which i)revails throughout the 
United Kingdom, Great Britain's colonial de- 
pendencies have evidently entered upon a 
period of rising wealth and power. India 
alone of all her outlying possessions presents 
a forbidding aspect. Canada is enjoying an 
interval of growth in population and riches 
unparalleled in her history. Conditions in 
South Africa are highly prosperous, and the 
approaching confederation of the British 
colonies in that continent along lines some- 
whal similar to those followed in Canada and 
.\ustralia promises to add immensely to the 
strength and influence of the colonial empire. 

The development of Australia is particu- 
larly impressive. Since the formation of the 
Australian commonwealth in 1901 the colo- 
nies composing it have flourished as never 
before, and their material growth has been 
accompanied by a corresponding gain of in- 
fluence in the British imperial system. Some 
instructive facts concerning this develop- 
ment were stated by Sir John Forrest, the 
Comonwealth Treasurer, in an address be- 
fore the .Australian Parliament, on August 
12. According to his figures, Australia's 
population has increased from 400,000 to 
4, .'00,000 in sixty years, 96 per cent of the 
present inha])ilants being English. They 
have bank deposits of $.560,000,000 and sav- 
ings bank deposits of $230,000,000, one per- 
son in every three of the entire population 
being a depositor. .Australia has produced 
$3,565,000,000 of minerals. She has 2,000,- 
000.000 acres of land, 10,000,000 of which arc 
under cultivation. She has 90,000.000 sheep, 
10,000,000 cattle and 2,000,000 horses. Her 
wheat crop in 1908 amounted to 62,000.000 
bushels, her wool clip was worth $115,000,- 
000, and .she exported $14,185,000 worth of 
butter. .Nustralia has 12.000 miles of coast 
line, and her imports and exports last year 
amounted to $570,000,000. 

Hap])ily for England, these great colonial 
(]ei)endcncies, Canada, South Africa and 
.Australia, are all dominated by a growing 
sentiment of loyalty to the empire. — New 
York Mail. 



NEWFOUNDLAND'S FISHING FLEET. 



The Provincial press of Prince Edward 
Island notes with much interest the fact 
that the Newfoundland sealing fleet which 
sailed from St. Johns on March 10 is 
equipped with wireless telegraph apparatus, 
which will greatly lessen the usual anxiety 
felt, as almost daily reports are anticipated. 
This fleet of sealers consists of twenty-three 
steamships manned by nearly 1,000 men; 
seventeen of the vessels ' proceed to the 
Grand Banks, while the other si.x cruise in 
the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In former years 
the vicinity of the Alagdalen Islands, 40 miles 
to the north of Prince Edward Island, was 
good sealing ground, but of late years the 
seals have not been found in that district 
in any great numbers. 



Resembling ice tongs in appearance, but 
without sharp ends, are the new tools iii- 
vented by a Connecticut man to facilitate 
the handling of hose by firemen. 



For fair goods of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
Ijy the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free te.xt books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

7^fTERNATI0NAL SEAMEIM'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Fage b.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 122 Alexander St.. P. O. Box 
1365. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, Wash., 1312 Western Ave.. P. O. Box «5. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Qulncy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box «2. 

PORTI..\ND, Or., 51 Union Ave. 

EUREK.A. Cal., 227 First St.. P. O. Box 327. 

SAN PEI'RO, Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOI,UI>tT. H. T.. Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch.; 
SE.\TTI,E, Wash., I40S14 W'estern Ave., P. O. 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. C.il.. 51 Steuart SL 

Branches: 
SE.A.TTLE. Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13. P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash.. P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

ASTORI.^. Ore.. P. O. Box 13S. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOW'N, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION, 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LOP.ING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBI'RG. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be i]rocured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET. SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



NOVA SCOTIA LOBSTER FISHERIES. 



The lobster fishermen of Cape Breton Is- 
land have been much exercised over the pre- 
vailing price of $2.25 per luindred weight 
( 112 pounds) for this year's catch. Unfortu- 
nately they were led to believe that the pack- 
ers of Nova Scotia had combined to hold 
down the price, and further that there was 
no legitimate reason for not paying last 
year's price, ranging from $3.25 to $4.05 per 
himdredweight. The truth of the situation 
is that never before have the wholesale deal- 
ers carried over so large a stock of last year's 
packing as they did from 1908 into 1909. 
This year's catch can only be disposed of at 
a reduction from last year's prices. 

At various points throughout Nova Scotia 
the lobster fishermen have held conferences 
to devise ways and means of meeting the 
present situation. At Mainadieu, where an 
American firm (one of the largest packers in 
Nova Scotia) has a factory, the fishermen 
refused to sell at $2.25 and gave the manager 
to understand that he might just as well 
close his plant, which he promptly did. After 
being convinced of the hopelessness of their 
contention and realizing their inability to sell 
elsewhere for more than $2.25, they sought 
to induce the firm to reopen its plant at 
Mainadieu and accept their catch at $2.25 
per hundredweight. The firm replied in sub- 
.'^tance that its crew had been disbanded and 
that it regretted its inability at so late a date 
to reorganize for this year's business. At 
the village referred to and at Mira Bay about 
100 families are solely dependent on lobster 
fishing for a livelihood. They are now sell- 
ing their catch to the Louisburg factory at 
the same price offered by the Mainadieu can- 
nery before closing. 

At a Gabarouse meeting of the fishermen, 
attended by a member and an ex-member of 
Parliament, it was shown that last year the 
packers paid at Gabarouse $4.05 per hun- 
dredweight. The fishermen held that if they 
were to accept $2.25 this year it would mean 
starvation. After considerable arguing, the 
fishermen decided to organize and do their 
own packing on the coroperative plan. There 
will be two plants, one at Gabarouse and the 
other at Gull Cove. 

At Antigonish the fishermen held off for 
a long time, traps were idle, and the fac- 
tories closed. Now the majority of che lob- 
ster fishermen have decided to accept the 
packers' offer of $2.25, which is $1.25 less 
than what was paid last year per hundred- 
weight. 

If the co-operative factories at Gabarouse 
and Gull Cove prove to be a success, it is a 
.safe prediction that the next year will see 
other lobster-fishing villages following their 
example. Further success would mean that 
eventually the entire lobster-canning indus- 
try of Nova Scotia, now largely in the hands 
of Americans, will pass over into the hands 
of Canadians. 

Some years ago the question of granting 
lobster-fishing licenses to aliens came up be- 
fore Parliament. I have been informed that 
during the next session this same question 
will come up again, and that the opposition 
will have considerably more support than it 
had the last time this question was con- 
sidered. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns ! 



SEAWEED AS FERTILIZER. 



Seaweed as a fertilizer is very much ap- 
preciated by the French fishermen who cul- 
tivate little vegetable gardens on St. Pierre 
and Dog Islands. Even the farmers of Mi- 
quelon and Langley, the two large islands 
in the group, find the sea grass deposited in 
large quantities along the shore equally as 
valuable as manure from the barnyards. 

Only Miquelon and Langley can be said 
to have any agricultural interests whatever, 
but in spite of prevailing high winds and a 
rocky soil it is surprising what quantities of 
vegetables are produced in the little patches 
of ground fit for cultivation on St. Pierre and 
Dog Islands. Dog Island seems to be little 
more than a great rock, and St. Pierre is 
not much better, but here and there in the 
"pockets" are found little plots of earth. 
These are carefully and gradually devel- 
oped by annual applications of seaweed un- 
til the maximum of production is reached. 
From that time on the weed is used to 
maintain the strength of the soil. 

Seaweed is used for fertilizer in some 
other parts of the world, but usually the grass 
is first burned, and only the ashes are put on 
the land. In St. Pierre, however, the weed 
gathered on the rocky shores is spread 
broadcast in its natural state. Newfound- 
land dogs, which are largely used as beasts 
of burden here, are factors, in this work of 
gathering and distributing seaweed. The 
faithful creatures can often be seen strug- 
gling up the hills, drawing heavily loaded 
carts. 

Seaweed is very plentiful, especially after 
storms, when it is found in great quantities 
on the beach. The fertilizing power of sea- 
weed is evidenced by the odor which begins 
to arise as soon as the plant starts to de- 
cay, becoming more pronounced and unmis- 
takable as the decomposition advances. 
This odor leaves no doubt of the presence of 
quantities of animal matter in the seaweed. 
Cabbages, celery, and lettuce thrive in this 
sea fertilizer. Potatoes, however, do not 
seem to do so well. Beets and certain kinds 
or varieties of peas also yield satisfactorily. 
The summer season, however, is very short. 



IMMIGRATION INTO BRAZIL. 



The elaborate immigration system of Bra- 
zil is declared satisfactory by the authori- 
ties concerned. The following extract is from 
the annual message of President Penna to the 
Brazilian Congress: 

"The number of persons entering the 
country in 1908 was 112,234, of which 17,539 
were ordinary passengers and 94,695 were 
immigrants. Compared with the previous 
year there was an increase of 26,908 immi- 
grants, or about 40 per cent. The number of 
immigrants coming on their own initiative 
was 74,999, and those brought in at the ex- 
pense of the Union numbered 11,109. The 
growth in immigration has continued into 
the ])rcscnt year, as is seen by the figures 
for the first c|uartcr in the port of Rio de 
Janeiro only, the number being 13,580, as 
compared with 8,607 in 1908 and 5,943 in 
1907. In spite of the meager sum appro- 
priated for this service it has been carried on 
with due regularity, both as to the recep- 
tion of immigrants in the ports and as to 
their settlement in the States." 



MARINE COOKS IN AUSTRALIA. 



The award of the Australian Common- 
wealth Arbitration Court is reported, fixing 
the wages of cooks, bakers, butchers, and 
scullery men employed on the interstate 
passenger and cargo steamers of the Com- 
monwealth Steamship Owners' Association. 
The following statement has been compiled, 
showing the minimum monthly wages: 

Employes. Award. Claimed. 

Interstate steamers: 

Chief cook $6,1.25 $68.00 

Second cook 41.35 43.80 

Third cook 29.20 31.60 

Ship's cook 36.45 39.00 

Baker 43.80 46.25 

Second baker, no award, pres- 
ent wages shown 24.35 34.00 

BiUcher 34.00 39.00 

Scullery man 26.75 26.75 

Passenger vessels trading within 
the limits of any one State: 

Chief cook 58.40 58.40 

Second cook 34.00 34.00 

Third cook 24.35 24.35 

Cooks on hoard cargo and col- 
lier steamers 48.70 48.70 

In announcing the award of the Arbitra- 
tion Court, Justice Higgins spoke as fol- 
lows : 

"The main features of my award are that 
I treat the payment of something like a liv- 
ing wage as the first essential to the settle- 
ment of a dispute, and that as far as possi- 
ble I appraise the difi^erent degrees of skill 
according to the same scale as at present 
used and accepted by employers and em- 
ployed. It is gratifying to know from the 
admissions of the respondents that the in- 
creases in pay are not beyond the capacity 
of this great industry, and that, while they 
will bring a gleam of gladness into many 
an humble household, they will not dimin- 
ish the comforts of shareholders in the com- 
panies. I propose that the award shall have 
operation for five years from its date ; and, 
in order to give time for making any new 
arrangements, that the new conditions as 
to work in port and the first payment of 
the increased wages shall begin with the 
year 1909." 



JAPANESE WHALING COMBINE. 



\Vith a view to placing the industry on a 
better and more paying basis, arrangements 
have been made as to an amalgamation of 
the Toyo, Dai Nippon, Nagasaki, and Tei- 
koku whaling companies, and steps are now 
being taken toward the buying u]) of the 
Naigai, Tokai, Taiheiyo, and five other com- 
I)anies. It is expected that the new amal- 
gamated com]>any will be in a position to 
open business by the beginning of April. 
The capital of the company is to be $2,500,- 
000 gold, of which $1,500,000 will be paid up. 
Mr. I). Maki will be president. The total 
catch of whales during the year ending 
August last amounted to 1,790 carcasses. 
The demand for whale flesh in the country, 
es])ecially in Kyushu, is steadily increasing, 
but the export of whale oil has been inactive 
of late years, largely owing to the depression 
of trade in Germany. In consequence of the 
increase in the number of whalers, an aver- 
age catch of each vessel has decreased in the 
total. Moreover, the wholesale and indis- 
criminate slaughlcr of wiiales is seriously in- 
terfering with the propagation of the animal, 
and the authorities are said to have in con- 
templation the ado])tion of some measures to 
prevent the reckless destruction of whales 
as at present. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Tlic German Imperial Government 
will ask for a loan of $125,000,000 in 
the beginning of 1910 to cover def- 
icits. 

A bomb was exploded at Barce- 
lona on October 15 in the street 
fronting the bishop's palace. Pieces 
of the metal seriously injured three 
policemen and a citizen. 

Cholera threatens to become .se- 
riously epidemic at Seoul, Corca. 
The authorities are taking every pre- 
caution, but Seoul is not a sanitary 
city and the disease has spread rap- 
idly. 

The naval harbor at Dover, Eng., 
which has been in course of construc- 
tion for eleven years and has cost 
about $20,000,000, was formally 
opened on October 15 by the Prince 
of Wales. 

A Russian imperial manifesto was 
published at Melsingfors on October 
14 ordering that the military contri- 
bution of $4,(X)O.O00 be taken from 
the Finnish treasury and turned over 
to Russia. 

The battleship Westfaleii. the first 
vessel of the super-Dreadnought type 
built for the German Navy, in a trial 
trip on October 12 developed a speed 
of twenty knots, while her engines 
indicated 24,000 horsepower. 

According to an apparently au- 
thentic report. Admiral Sir John 
Fisher, senior naval lord of the Brit- 
ish Admiralty, will retire from the 
Admiralty on October 22 and be ele- 
vated to the peerage, with the title of 
BaroB Thetford. 

Francisco Ferrer, convicted of 
complicity in the recent outbreak at 
Barcelona, was shot on October 1.3. 
The execution has aroused much re- 
sentment throughout Europe, fol- 
lowed by numerous demonstrations 
against the Spanish Government. 

The permanent International Peace 
Bureau at Brussels on October 10 
adopted a resolution suggesting that 
the governments of the world join in 
the creation of a fund for the relief 
of sufferers in the event of the oc- 
currence of great disasters in afiy- 
part of the world. 

The extraordinary budget of the 
Russian Ministry of Railroads has 
been submitted to the Douma. It 
calls for $31,100,000 for new con- 
struction in 1910. .Ml of this amount, 
with the exception of $163,000, will 
be expended in Siberia and on the 
Amur Railroad. 

It is understood that the Canadian 
Government's bill respecting naval de- 
fense to be brought before the com- 
ing session of Parliament will provide 
for a total capital expenditure of 
about $20,000,000 during the next six 
or seven years, the yearly approiiria- 
tion being about $3,000,000. 

The first Imperial edict recognizing 
the forthcoming Provincial Assem- 
blies was issued by the Chinese Gov- 
ernment on October 14. The Provin- 
cial Assemblies will make up the Im- 
perial Assembly, which is charged 
with the responsibility of drafting a 
constitution for the •Empire. 

The London Times says that the 
British Government has been con- 
sidering whether, in the event of the 
House of Lords rejecting the budget, 
it should not ascertain the opinion of 
the country by referendum instead of 
general election. Such a course, 
however, would necessitate the pass- 
ing of a special bill through Par- 
liament. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




Established 1SS8. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School In 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
American and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant officers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor. M. A.. Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor. Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters, including Naturalization. 



Seattle, Wagh., Letter Liat. 

Under a rule adopted by the SeattU 
Postoflice, letters addressed In care of 
I the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
! not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 



ROOS BROS. 

Biggest Values in Men's Clothing, 
Haberdashery f Hats 

50 YEA.RS IN BUSINESS 

ROOS^ROS. 

MARKET STREET San Francisco 



MARSHFIELD, OR. 

UNION CIGAR STORE 

383 FRONT ST. 

MARSHFIELD, OREGON 

Dealers In 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. CANDY, 

NUTS, ETC. 
Longshoremen and Sailors' Headquarters 
HERMAN CORDES, Prop. 
Phone 97-L 



EUREKA, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
seaman Ernst Dau, please notify the 
German Consul at San Francisco. 

James Thoburn was at the Sea- 
men's Institute about 1902. Letter 
awaiting him at 242 Steuart street, 
San Francisco. 

Arthur John Martin. Was in San 
Francisco last March. Any news of 
him sent to Seamen's Institute will be 
appreciated. 

Robert Fordyee Bowers, over 5 
feet in height, rather stout, was in 
American Navy during 1906. Letter 
awaiting him at Seamen's Institute, 
242 Steuart street, San Francisco. 

'''^Robert Fordyee Bowers, age 33 

years, height over 5 feet, stout build; 
correspondence awaiting him at Sea- 
men's Institute, 242 Steuart street, San 
Francisco. 

John M. Murphy, dark hair, blue 
eyes, height 5 feet 8, smooth face. 
Last heard of at Oakland. Any in- 
formation, communicate Seamen's In- 
stitute, 242 Steuart street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Harry W. Morse, of Watertown, 
Mass., about 5 ft. 8, light hair, blue 
eyes, wore glasses. Enquiry from 
Lillian J. Morse. Letter awaiting him 
at Seamen's Institute, Steuart street, 
San Francisco, 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Any one 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Portland, 
Ore. 

Henry Laurent, who has been sail- 
ing between San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 

John Johnson, a native of Norway, 
born September 15, 1858, at Blege- 
leidet Bamle; last heard from in 1904 
living at 230 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, 165 Third 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The Pride O'Humbolilt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO.. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," th« "Little 
Beauty," the "Prince**" and other 
high grade union-made cigar*. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, • Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET. COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



Allen. \V. J. 
Anderson, Alf. 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson. Carl P. 
Ankerstrom, C. 
Anker, C. 
Berentsen. R. 
Benson, E. 
Bianca, P. 
Bird, Chr. 
Bray. A. E. 
Braucr, Geo. 
Brown. Jim 
Burkland. John 
Carlson, Olo 
Carlson, lAidwik 
Carlson. Thure 
Carnell, Geo. B. 
Christofferson, Emii 
Christensen. VIggo 
Chapman, F. G. 
Conee. A. 
Coughlan. Chas. 
Daly, John 
Daniels, C. 
Droifelt. Albert 
Doll. Herman 
Egelkoft. Fred 
Elliot, W. V. 
Eliasen. E. 
Engberg, Oscar 
Ernst, George 
Erick, Mr. 
Erikson. Alton 
Erickson. Axel R. ' 
Espy. Orville 
Flynn. Maurice 
Fjelstad, K. M. 
Franz(!ll. Arthur 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
Gekler, Fritz 
Gonyette. Joseph 
Gustafson, Karl O. 
Hansen, H. C. -1998 
Haga, A. Andersen 
Hansen, T. S. 
Haug, H. H. 
Hansen, H. Johan 
Hansen, H. K. 
Harris, Jos. E. 
Hedlund, Arvid 
Hellwood, Mr. 
Hewitt, P. 
Jensen, Johannes 

-1684 
Jensen, Louis 
Jersch, W. 
Jorgensen, J. A. 
Jocketyn, J. 
Johnson, C. F. -1566 
Johnson. Eric 
Jolinson. P. K. J. 
Jolinson, Chas. 
Jolinson, C. J. 
Jolinsen, Hans 
Johansen, Knut 
Johansen, Alf. 
Johanson, Victor 
Johnson, Emit 
Klintberg, Chas. 
Kleine, Carl 
Klausen. KarL 
Klingenberg. John 
Krlstiansen. Louis 
Kristoffersen. Emit 
Krlstiansen, Nils 
Lathonen, Frank 
Larscn. H. C. M. 
Latz. Konstant 



Laurltsen. Hans 
Larsen, Kristian 
Ijaive, V. 
Linder. Victor 
Lind, Hjilmar E. 
Lorin. Kristian 
Mathison. Nils 
Martinson, Christ. 
Machado. Jj. 
Malmberg, A. C. 
M.ignusen, E. W. 
Martinsohn, A. 
Mc'Mahon. J. 
Mehuet, Jas. 
Mikkelsen. Kristian 
Miller, Adolf 
Molver. Olaf 
More, A. O. 
Morrison, J. 
Monoghan, J. 
Moore, James 
Nagel, A. 
Nelsen. M. 
Ness. Carl 
Nielsen. Wilhelm 
Nielsen, B. I'. 
Nielsen. Waldemar 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsson, Just 
Olsen. O. A. -872 
Olason, A. 
Olsson. Johan 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olson, Charles 
Orten, Sigurd 
Owens, J. 11. 
Peters. J. 

Pettersen, Sigurd 
Pernin. Clir. 
Pertells, W 
Penny. W. 
Petersen, P. 
Price, Bruce 
Rasmussen, A. N. 
Rasmussen, -R. -52,'> 
Reinman. Karl 
Rider, Arthur 
Rider, David 
Rugland. Ole 
Sandstrom, Th. 
Sanchez. F. 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Saalenes, T. J. 
Samuelson. Harold 
Schmak, M. 
Scherlen, Robert 
SchuUz. Ernest 
Sckubber. H. 
Skoog. August 
Soderlund, J. F. 
Solly, Ed. 
Sorensen. Hans 
Stoff. K. 
Syvertsen, Ole 
Swanson. J. 
Sunby. A. E. 
Tellefsen. Peder 
Thompson, T. 
Thorn, Arvid 
Torgersen, Ludvig 
Tockelyn, T. 
VIctorsen. Ernest M. 
"Warren, Louis 
Wallace. A. 
Walter, E. R. A. 
Wennecke, A. 
Wifstrand. C. T. 
Worm, Albert 



PORTLAND, OR. 



SCANDI A HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



GOOD 


FOR A 

CUP OF 


COFFEE 


OR A 


SQUARE MEAL 




TRY 




EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St*., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The five sailors who left the schoon- 
er A. J. West at Honolulu, on March 
30, 1908, are requested to communicate 
with the Secretary of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific. The libel against 
the A. J. West has been adversely de- 
cided by the Federal Court at Hono- 
lulu. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOIVI AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burniide 

Portland, Oregon. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
Office: 
33 UNION AVENUE - - Portland. Ora. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Thomas Ayres Phillips, seaman, last 
heard of at 44 Minna street, San Fran- 
cisco, in 1902. Information wanted 
by British Consul, San Francisco. 

Donald Corsie, sailor, aged about 
55, left the Great Lakes in 1885 for 
the West Coast and probably Aus- 
tralia, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Wm. McLaughlin, Julius Franz, K. 
Grunert, J. Koglund, W. Wickstrom 
and C. Christensen, who were mem- 
bers of the crew of the schooner Min- 
nie E. Caine at the time of her wreck, 
are inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



When making purchases from our 
•idvcrtiscrs. always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, 


WASH. 


BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



TACOMA, WASH. 



116 South 



' Street, 
Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron 8t. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &i CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. 8. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 




TACOMA, WASH 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



"THE WHITE HOUSE" 

ALEXANDER & McBRIDE 

403 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 



2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 



Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town 



Willi 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartiett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

11 Coleman Dock, SEATTLE, Wash. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1715. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
til Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed in the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. , 

494 ARCADE BUILDING 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



K. R. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



NILS HOKANSON 
High Class Tailor 

A place to go when othei.s fail to satisfy. 

First-Class Workmanship, Perfect Fit 
Guaranteed 

STRICTLY UNION IfOUSE. 

106 SPRING STREET 
Bet. 1st and 2d aves., Seattle, Wash. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Alfred Douglas Brakel, a native of( 
Russia, also known as Fred Hansen, 
left the Russian cruiser Lena; last 
heard of about three years ago, is in- 
(luircd for by his mother. Address, 
"Coast Sec^men's Journal." 



lam Watson, cliairman of the 
Cunard Steamship Company, died at 
London on October 4, aged 67 years. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 99 sail and steam vessels, of 5349 
gross 'tons were built in the United 
States during September. 

A ma.ximum speed of 34.548 knots 
was reported by the builders on Octo- 
ber 6 after the first of the official ac- 
ceptance trials of the new torpedo- 
boat destroyer Reid. 

Rear-Admiral James Barclay, U. S. 
N., retired, died at Boston on Septem- 
ber 26, aged 66 years. He was widely 
recognized as a torpedo and ordnance 
expert. 

Three British armored cruisers and 
three French battleships which have 
been attending the Hudson-Fulton 
celebration sailed from New York on 
October 8, leaving behind a substantial 
number of their men. 

Eight midshipmen have been recom- 
mended to be dropped from the An- 
napolis Naval .Academy because of 
their failure to pas.s on their re-ex- 
amination last month in the studies in 
which they were found to be deficient 
at the June examination. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 347 sail and steam vessels, of 48,- 
914 gross tons were built in the United 
States during the quarter ended Sep- 
tember 30. During the corresponding 
quarter ended September 30, 1908, 319 
sail and steam vessels of .20,887 gross 
tons were built. 

Fight transatlantic liners arrived at 
New York on October 3, bringing the 
largest number of passengers the Cus- 
tom-house has ever been called upon 
to handle in a single day. It was a 
record day for cabin passengers, 4294 
being landed. The steerage passen- 
gers numbered 4200. 

There are indications that Secretary 
of the Navy Meyer may overrule 
former President Roosevelt's '"surgeon 
in command" order, which brought 
about the sudden resignation of Rear- 
.\dniiral Willard H. Brownson, Chief 
of the Bureau of Navigation, on 
Christmas Fve of 1907. 

A new commercial enterprise known 
as the South American Fruit and 
steamship Company, was launched at 
Baltimore recently. The concern will 
have a capital stock of $300,000. The 
company expects to run a line of 
steamships along the coast of Ecua- 
dor, trading at the seaports in bananas, 
oranges and cocoanuts. The first 
boat.-, will j.tart in a few days, it is 
said. 

The Newport News Shipbuilding 
Company, building the battleship 
Delaware, has asked the Navy Depart- 
ment for a trial trip of the vessel on 
October 20. The probability is that 
the ship will be delivered to the Gov- 
ernment some months ahead of con- 
tract time. The battleship North Da- 
kota is in a like state of completion at 
the dock of the Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Quincy, Mass. 

There are now 44,149 enlisted men 
in the Navy, as against ^,027 in 1907, 
and the percentage of citizens has 
increased from 93.1 per cent in 1907 
to 95.7 per cent in 1909. The per- 
centage of native born men in the 
Navy h^is also increased from 82 per 
cent in 1907 to 88.4 per cent in 1909. 
Steady increase is shown in eidist- 
ments. In 1907 the total was 14,329, 
while in 1909 the total enlistments 
luimbered 18,723, Over 80,000 ap- 
plicants were rejected. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter List. 



Three Chinese were electrocuted at 
the State prison in Charlestown, 
Mass., on October 11. tor the murder 
of four of their countrymen in a 
"tong"' war in Chinatown, on .August 
2. 1907. 

It is reported that negotiatioris arc 
pending whereby the Burlington Rail- 
road may secure an outlet to the Pa- 
cific Coast through the purchase of 
an interest in the Denver and Rio 
Grande Railroad. 

Snow plows were necessary to clear 
the tracks for the operation of trains 
on the railroads east of Winnipeg on 
October 14. Snow to the depth of 
sixteen inches had fallen and a bliz- 
zard was raging. 

Wilbur Wright received $12,500 
from the Hudson-Fulton commission 
for the spectacular flights he made 
over New York Bay and up the Hud- 
son during the celebration. Glenn 
H. Curtiss received $5(K)0. 

The ballot to be voted at the munic- 
ipal election in New York on Novem- 
ber 2 will measure four feet live. 
inches wide and nineteen inches deep, 
and will contain the names of 1000 
candidates in twenty-one columns. 

Federal Judge Marshall, at Ard- 
more, Okla., on October 15, over- 
ruled the defendant's motion to quash 
the indictments charging Governor 
Haskell and other Oklahomans with 
fraudulently scheduling town lots in 
Muskogee. 

The directors of the .\tchison, To- 
peka and Santa Fe Railroad on Octo- 
ber 6 declared a semi-annual dividend 
of 3 per cent on the common stock. 
This is an increase of one-half per 
cent over the last previous _ semi- 
annual declaration. 

The Postoffice Department has 
made a request upon the Secretary of 
the Treasury to authorize the Bureau 
of Engraving and Printing to issue 
20.000,000 additional Hudson-Fulton 
commemorative postsige stamps. The 
original issue of these stamps was 
50,000,000. 

The citizens of El Paso, Texas, will 
present Presidents Taft and Diaz with 
loving-cups when they meet there on 
October 16. The cups will be of solid 
I8-karat gold and will be duplicates. 
Each will bear the coat of arms of 
both Mexico and the United States 
and incriptions. 

A special session of the Hawaiian 
Legislature is being considered by 
Governor Frear to take up the ques- 
tion of amendments to the Land 
laws to be urged upon Congress at its 
next meeting. The Governor is plan- 
ning for a general opening of all 
available public lands in the Territory 
to settlers from the United States. 

In an interview at Lowell, Mass., 
on October 8, General A. W. Greely, 
the Arctic explorer, expressed the 
opinion that both Cook and Peary 
reached the North Pole. None of the 
objections yet raised to Cook's narra- 
tive seemed to General Greely to be 
fatal and the alleged discrepancies ap- 
peared to him to be susceptible of 
reasonable explanation. 

Judge A. B. Anderson, of the United 
States Court at Indianapolis, Ind., on 
October 12, dismissed the proceedings 
against Delavan Smith and Charles R. 
Williams, proprietors of the Indian- 
apolis News, who were charged with 
libel in publishing articles alleging 
there was a corrupt profit of $28,000,- 
OOO in the sale of the Panama Canal 
to the United States. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
montlis only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors" 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abhors, Arne 
Abraliainsen, A. 
Aga, Jolian 
Akerson, Clias. A. 
Alander. O. J. 
Alver. A. M. 
Amundsen, Daniel 
Andersen, Chr. 
Andersen, -15Bi 
Andersen, Sam 
Andersen, Anton 
Andersen, -1108 
Andersen, -1514 
Andersen, -1048 
Andersen, -1560 
Andersen, -1305 

Hakke, Ed. 
Barrinto, J. 
Hastion, \V. 
Beck, Mr. 
BtH-knian, Hudolph 
Beikwitli. Geo. 
BcnSL'M. H. 
Berg, Julius 
Bcrt'nt.'seii, -1755 
Berlinz. lOmil 
Berntsson, M. 
Bevil:ii'(|ae, O. 
Birile, Chr. 
Birkelund, R. 
Bjiirklund. Erik 
Blindheim, O. C. 
Bliesath, Max 

Carlson-760 
Carlson, Fred 
(,'arlson, John 
Carlson, -1063 
Carlsson, John W. 
Carnaghan, Mr. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen-905 

Ualil, John B. 
Diez, Th. H. 
IJixon, John 
Doose, Wm. 
Dories, tl. 

Eklund, Harry 
Kkwall, G. A. 
Eliasen, C 
Kliasen, -3tf6 
l':iiassi-n, Sigurd 
ElUngsen, Fred 
Engberg, Oskar Leo 
Engblom. Albert 
Eriksen, B. H. 

Farnen, \V. Ij. 
Faulknc-r, John E. 
Feeley. i liomas 
Fildt, K. G. U. 
Fogland, Arthur 

Gabrielsen, Elling 
Geiger, Joe 
Gibbs, Harry D. 
Gronman, H. K. 
iJulberson, A. 
Gunnarson, John 

Halloran, Chas. A. 
Hallslrom, J. E. 
Halvorsen, H. B. 
Halvorsen, Jolian 
Halvorsen, Severin 
iialvorsen. Win. 
Hansen- 1869 
Hansen, Bmil 
Hanson, John 
llaiisen, -1195 
Hansen-1576 
Hansen, H. T. 
Hansen, Jens M. 
Hansen, Theo. 
Hansen, Enok 
Hansen, Charles 

Iiigebretsen, -125 
Ingeman. -132 
Ingwardsen, R. 

Jacobsen, Jacob 
Jacobsen, Hans H. 
Jacobsen, M;irtin 
Jacobsen, -17S<6 
Jansson, Andreas I. 
Jensen, N. O. 
Jensen, Edw. K. 
Jensen, Ingwald M. 
Jensen, -769 
Jensen, -1791 
Jensen, -1944 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen. -1076 
Jepson, A. 
Jenson, T. C. 
Johansen, Carl 
Joliansen, Joaklm 
Johansen, C. H. 
Johansen-1191 

Kaho, H. 
Kalman, L. 
Kane, G. 
KarUsen, -3SS 
Karlsen, Konrad 
Karlson, Aug. 
Karlson, Richard 
Karlsson, Gust. 
Karlsson, -760 
Karlgren-644 
Karthausir, Otto 
Kaufhold, Ed. 
Kavall, John 
Keelan, J. 
Kellgren, J. A. 
Kenniston. Frank 
Kerch, Geo. C. 

Laason, -1790 
Laason. M. 
Lphr. Otto 
Laine. W. E. 
I.,ane, Leonard 
Lane, Leeland 
Langrvardt, Chr. 
Larsen. Peter 



Anderson, -1048 
Andersen, Sven 
Anilcrsen, -1541 
Anderson, A. C 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, John 
.Andersson, Emil 
Andersson, Karl T. 
Andersson-1552 
Antonsen, Marius 
Arnold, E. B. 
Amtsen, Julian 
Aunbaun, A. 
Aylward, Jas. 

Blomqvist. Chas. 
Bohm, Emil 
Borresen, Niels 
Bourbigou, Louis 
Bower, G. 
lio.vesson, John 
Brandt, Oscar 
Bray, John K. 
Bray, Edward 
Bregler, Fred 
Brelin. Adolph 
Brewer, Wm. 
Brinton. Geo. 
Browne, Harold W. 
Brox, Harry 
Buaas, Thomas 
Bung. B. 

Christensen, S. 
Christensen-1332 
Christiansen, J. F. 
C'hrisloffersen, Jacob 
Chisholm, R. 
Claus, C. 
Couglilan, -1174 
Cutler, Wm. 

Dracar, Edgardo 
Drausmann, Chas. 
Uully, Alex 
Duncan, G. M. 
Durholt, Hugo 

Eriksen, Karl J. 
Krikson, E. W. 
Eriksson, -333 
Erickson, A. 
Erickson, Fred 
t-ncson, C N\ . 
Erikson, P. E. 
Espensen, E. N. 

Folwick, Carl 
Frankovich, A. 
l''rederiksen, B. 
Fredricksen, -529 
Froberg, T. W. 

Gunderson. Ole 
Gundersen-785 
Gundersen, Martin 
Gustafsson, G. B. 
Gutierez, A. 

Hanson, R. W. 
Harmening, Fritz 
Hedlund, Orvid 
Heesche, H. 
Hegener, Reinhold 
Heinz, Jack 
Hendriksen, Adolf 
Henriksen, Adolf G. 
Hentsrhel, Otto 
Hermansen, -1622 
Hewston, Jas. 
Hoglund, Frank 
Holt, Karl C. 
Holz-1764 
Hultberg-lS33 
Hultman, Albin 

Isaacsen, Isaac 
Itvelt, F. 



W. 



Jolianson, A. F. 
Johanson, -880 
Johansson, Victor 
Johnsen, -1281 
.Johnsen, Andreas 
Jolinson, John 
Johnson, Hilton C. 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, A. L. 
Johnson, -1509 
Johnson, Geo. 
Johnson, Hilmer 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, Fred 
Johnsson, I'rank 
Jonassen, Johan 
Jorgensen, Johan 
Josephson, E. W. 
Jouanne, Walter 

Kerr, Wm. 
Klahn, Karl 
Klaesson, Axel 
Klebingat. Fr. 
Klingstrom, G. 
Klingstrom. G. 
Kluge, Frank 
Knutsen, Halfdan 
Koff. M. 
Kolter, L. 
Kopats, Oscar 
Krautschard, F. 
Krestensen, C. E. 
Kristensen, -10S8 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kristiansen, L. A. 
Kuehme, W. 

I^ehto, Alex. 
Leino, G. F. 
Leibold, Fritz 
Leithoff, Carl 
fjewald. Harry 
I-ieberg. Gustaf 
Lindberg, .John 
Lindholm-610 



Larsen, Ludv. J 
Larson, L. 
Lass, -1406 
Lauretsen, Ole 

Madsen. -952 
Malmin. Tom 
Margnusson, E. 
Markmann, H. 
Martin. Geo. 
Matiiiesen, L. 
Matlsson, K. J. 
MattsKon. Edw. 
Matthews. H. J. 
Mattler, Franz 
Mi-L'lelland, Thos. 
McKeown, Thos. 

Narepu, F. 
Nauman. Alf. 
Nelsen, B. P. 
Nol.sen, -641 
Nelsen, Olaus 
Nelson, Martin 
Nelson, C. M. 
Nesbitt, J. 
Nesler, Wilson C 
Nielsen, -950 

O'Daly. John 
Oiestad, Hans 
Olafsson. M. 
Olsen, Olai 
Olsen, Gust. 
Olsen. Soren 
Olsen, -47S 
Olsen, Paulus 
Olsen-996 



Lindvist, Carl A. 
Lindroes, Oscar 
Lohne, E. 
Lundberg, John 

McKinley. Wm. 
Mehent, Joe 
Melart, Kolf 
Michelson, -1690 
Mikkelsen, Axel M. 
Mikkelsen, A. S. 
Miller, Jas. 
Moller. L. 
Monroe, Geo. E. 
Morken, Kristian 
Munze, Dick 



Nielsen. -909 
Nielsen, -1030 
Nielsen, -1014 
Nielsen, -918 
Niemi, Fr. 
Nilsen, C. J. 
Niisson. Carl F. 
Nobereit, Gus 
Norvik, Morten 



olsson, John Oscar 
Olsson, Alf. 
Olsson, J. W. 
Olsson. Karl 
Osol, Th. R. 
Osterdahl, Chxa. 
Ostlund, Edward 
Ounpaum, A. 



Pache. I' 


aul 


Peter.sen, 


S. 


Palizek, 


Lorenz 


I'etersen, 


Oluf 


Paulsen, 


Paul 


Petersen. 


Richard 


Pear.son, 


J. T. 


Petersen. 


Chas. 


Pedersen 


S. Rein- 


I'etersen. 


-782 


hold 




Peterson, 


-1318 


Pedersen 


Karl 


Peterson, 


Johan 


Pedersen 


-1006 


Peterson, 


Henry 


Pedersen 


-1136 


Peterson, 


-1164 


Pedersen 


-1263 


Pettersen 


O. T. 


I'edersen 


-1289 


Petterson 


Oscar 



Pedersen, Olav 
I'edersen, Oluf Chr. 
Pedersen, Pedar M. 
Pedersen, Olaf A. 
Pedersen, -1110 
Persson. HJalmar 
Perssen, H. W. 
Peratls. W. 
Peters. J. 

Ramlov. Emil 
Kasmussen. -525 
Hasmusen, Robert 
Rasmusen, -923 
Rasmuson, A. 
Ree^e, -685 
Keichelt. H. A. 
Remmer, Louis E. 
Reutern. Axel 
Rigoult, Bert 
(toalsen. K. B. 
Robinet. G. 

Sampson. Carl 
Samsing. Carl 
Sandberg. N. A. 
Sander, Chas. 
Sandell, -2222 
.Searahosio. M. 
Schevig, A. B. 
Schluter, Paul 
Schmehl. Paul 
Schmi<lt, Fritz 
Schmitt, Geo. 
Si'lmeokloth. Kd. 
Schrodt, Alf. 
Pcliiiltz, Alliert 
Schutz, Ludvlg 
Schiiltze. Axel 
Schwenkt. Kar'. 
Srhwitzer, Herman 
Scott, Ed. 
Semberg. John 
Siebert, Harry 
Siem. C. 

Rilfoerberg. Harold 
Simpson, L. C. 
Smith. Fred 
Smith, -648 
Smith, John V. 

Teigland, Karl 
Thorsen-615 
Thorsen-689 
Thorn. Arvld 
Thorsell, Ch. 
Tillman. Chas. 
Tiller, E. 

Utves, K. L. 
Valeur, Marius 
Vega. F. A. 
Verdick. C. 
Wahlstrom, Alb. 
Wiekman. P. 
Wallin, John 
Watson. A. J. 
Welsen, J. 
Werner, Paul 
Westhofer. H. 
Wetzel, Curt 
Weyer, Paul 
Weyman. Emil 
Whiteley, James 
Zlffer, Clias. 



Petterson, Anton 
Pettersson, -709 
I^etter-sson, -1208 
Pettersson, Sigurd 
Picard. Frank 
I'las. Henry 
Pratt. Mr. 
Purnhagen, Ludv. 



Robsham, Jens W. 
Rochov, Steven 
Rokov. Steffan 
Rommel, Andrew 
Rosenvald, Isak 
Rost, K. G. 
Rotlov. St. 
Roussel, Fernand 
Rudberg, C. 
Ruthberg. E. 
Rylts, A. 
Ryberg, S. 

Smith. Jas. B. 
Soderlund. A. 
Soland, Hans 
Solberg, T. 
Sorensen, -1492 
Sorensen, -1664 
Southerland. A. 
Sovik. H. 
Sprague. C. B. 
Steen, Helmar 
Stein. John 
Stensland. Paul 
Stephens. -1979 
Steusloff. Emil 
Strand. Louis 
Strand. Olav 
Suominen, N. 
Sutierez. Arthur 
Svendsen. A. F. S. 
Svendsen. Anker 
Svendsen, Otto A. 
Svendsen. Otto 
Swensson, Martin 
Swansson, Emil 
Swensson, I>. G. 
Syvertsen. Hans 



Tipp, T. 
Tofte. H. 

Torkelsen. Marlnus 
Torvik. Olaf 
Trenton. Louis 
Tuvesson, John 



VIckers, John 
Vortman, Wm. 

Wikland, Chas. 

Wikstrom. Wm. 
Wilke, Wm. 
Will, C. 
WInblad, M. 
Winter, -1057 
Winters, Ch. 
Witol. E. 
Wolter, John 
Wunsdorf, Aug. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Alfo, John 
Aeckerle, Ernst 
Anderson. Bskil 
Andersson, J. S. 
Berntsen, JuUua 
Cox, H. E. 
Farm, J. B. 
Fostwedt, Carl 
Hultberg, Ernst 
Jensen, M. 
Jacobsen, Hans 
Johnson. C. A. 
Kearns, Edwin 
Koch, Carl 
Kjorsvik. Johan 
Kruger. Heinrlch 
Kent, Jack 
Klebingat, Fred 



Llndeman, A. 
Lorin, Crtstian 
Lynd, Chas. 
Moren. E. H, 
Olson, Olaf 
Olson. Otto 
Ponnl Anton 
Patterson. A. K. 
Roalsen. Fred 
Rasmussen, Andrew 
Scott. Ed. 
Sundholm, Freppa 
Schultz. Ernst 
Schmidt. Franz 
Schneider. William 

1. 
Sanchez, Frank 
Tamm, P. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, A. B. Jacobsen, Olai 

Anderson, Chas. -907Johanson, Emil 
Behrent, E. -1579 Larsen. Holger 



Berndt, Hugo 
Buhmeister, John 
Chapman, F. 
Charlson. M. 



Lund, Peter 
McGuire. George 
Meyers, Chas. 
Nilsen. Oscar L. 



Christoffersen. Emil Nordenberg. John 



Clausen. Nils 
Davey. Chas. 
Ekblom. Alfred 
Eklund, Sven W. 
Eliasen, E. -396 
Franzell, A. 



Olsen. Ole Johan 
Olsen. Sigvald 
Poppe. George 
Ratshet. August 
Saunders, J. 
Sovig. Chas. 



Frederickson. F. H. Swanson. Ben 
-529 Turner, Alfred 

Hansen, Pete Turner. Richard 

Harris, J. Wells, Leo L. 

Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Ahrens, W. 
Anderson, E. 
Alexander. K. 
Arnold, E. B. 
Anderson, P. T. 
Anderson, Harry 
Andersson, J. R. 
Anderson, -1534 
Abbors, A. 
Anderson. Sven 
Appelgreen. J. 
Buchtman, F. 
BiUlngton, M. 
Blrkelund. R. 
Busse. Ch. 
Brandt, N. 
Benson, Jon. 
Boosban. Ch. 
Carlson. K. J. 
Cliristensen. H. 
.Christensen, C. E. 
Duval, Benolt 
Dories, H. 
Do we, J. 
Domhoff, J. 
Drager, Otto 
Eiehel, Ch. 
Eliassen, H. -599 
Eliassen, G. -1427 
Focketyn. F. 
Furman, F. 
Frank, F. -499 
Goepper, Ch. 
Godley, Geo. 
Hansen, H. M. 
Haniger, A. J. 
Hammond, J. A. 
Hammerquist, A. J. 



Hope, Ole 
Jacobsen, -1786 
Johansson, 1700 
Johannesson, J. 
Jacobsen. Erland 
Jensen. L. 
Jalonen. J. 
Johannesen, Carslen 
Kristiansen, L. 
Kavander. W. 
Koskinen. W. 
Long, L. 
Lerch, Paul 
Lewis, G. H. 
Lundgreen, C. 
Matsson, Karl 
Morris, Oscar 
Mulley, James 
Maibom. H. 
Metge, G. 
Morden. J. 
Michalsen. J. 
Nielsen. V. -1000 
Oien, Thom. 
Orten, S. 
Pierson. A. 
Pederson, -896 
Petersen, C. 
Pedersen. James 
Rantanen, -770 
Rustanious. J. 
Ouistgard. C. 
Swales. A. B. 
Swansen. Carl 
Syversen. H. 
Tuvfeson. Knut 
Taddiken, A. 
Vongher, Ed. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



.\nderson. Sven 
Behrens, E. -1549 
Boyle. John 
Chapman, F. S. 
Hillig, Albert 
Holtberg, John C. 
Johansen, - 2021 
Knucken, T. 
Klebingal, Fred 



Lundgren, Carl 
McCallum, Charles 
Xagel, Arthur 
Peterson, Paul 
Rosenfeld, Ij. 
Stabell, Frank 
Sundquist, Carl 
Walser. Ernest 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S LETTER LIST. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Letters at the Alaska Fishermen's of- 
fice will be advertised for six men t is 
only and will be returned to the lost 
Office at the expiration of seven moulhs 
from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify the 
Secretary of the Alaska Fishermen's 
Union of their present address, in order 
to have their mail forwarded them. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Andersson. Vicktor 
Dahlman, Axel 
Hansen, Chas. 
Holmstrom. Carl A. 
Jensen. -1944 
Johnson. Chas. 
Johannessen. -1863 
Kolstad. Anton 



Morken. Kristian 
Osol, Theo. K. 
Ruhlmann, Louis 
Ruthberg. E. 
Stangeland, Peter 
Torkildsen. Marius 
Wllberg. John 
Zimmerman. F. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Andreasen. Mogens 
Andersen, August 
Anderson, Axel 
Arntsen, Albert 
B«nson, John 
Bowman, Bernard 
Farrell, Henry D. 
GuUiksen, Gustav 
Green, John 
Hageli, F. 
Hagen, G. L. 
Hansen, Harry 
Hammerin, F. B. 
Jensen. Chs. 
Johnson. George P. 



Johannesen, August 
Kerr, Wm. 
Mullen, James E. 
Nielsen, Carl Johan 
Nicolarsen, Otto 
Niisson, Carl 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olson. Ole 
Olsen. Olaf 
pettersen, Isaac 
Prescott, Fred 
Rlise, Wm. 
Swanson, Chas. 
Thompson, A. 
Tonnessen. Jorgen 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Anderson. H. A. 

-1449 
Anderson. Olof 
Anderson, S. 
Armmi, Walter 
Bartels, C. H. 
Beary, Charles 
Bentsen, Bent 
Blunt. H. 
Bostrom, C 



Lambar, Erminio 
Lorensen. Orgt. C. 
MIehell. Agojtino 
Mittemeljer. J. F. 
Newman, J. S. 
Niccolai. Sant 
Nilsen. Ruder S. 
Nylund. Sven 
Olson. Bror 
Oman. Vicktor 



Brander, Frank -144301sen. G. 
Christensen, H. C. Oterdahl, Charles 



Clemensen, C. H. 
Conaughton, H. 
Edlund, Gust 
Geiger, Joseph 
Grant, John 
Gunther, Theo. 
Gustafson, Edvart 
Halvorsen, Ingval 
Hollins, Frank 
Isaacson, Gustav 
.Tohnsen, J. 
Karlsson, A. B. 



Pateejanski, R. 
Pedersen, P. G. 
Penny, Matt. 
Salminen, K. W. 
Shuils, Christ 
Sjellman, Jonas 
Svensen. Olof 
Stabell, Frank 
Teigland. G. 
Thoresen. G. 
Thoresen, Petter 
Walbreth, Carl 



Kittelsen, Chritlan Wlckstrom, Charles 
Knudsen. Jacob B. Yannl, C. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-S29 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal baw 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

(The German Bank) 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 

of San Franuisco.) 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital J1,2U0,00U.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds 1.504,4'.IS.6S 

Deposits, June 30, 1909 36,793,234.04 

Total Assets 39,435,681.34 

Remittance may be made by draft, postofflce 
or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s uioiiey orders, or coiu by 
express. 

Office hours — 10 o'clock a.m. to 3 o'clock p.m., 
except Saturdays to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday 
evenings from 7 o'clock p.m. to 8 o'clock p.m. 
for receipt of deposits only. 
0.5cers, 

President, N. Ohlandt; first vice president, 
Daniel Meyer; second vice preside it. Emil U"h!e: 
cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt: assistant cashier. 
William Herrmann: secretary. George Tonrny; 
assistant secretary. A. H. Muller; Goodtullow 
& Eells, general attonevs. ' 

Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Danel Mever. E:ni! KDlttf. Ign. 
Steinhardt. I. N. Walter. J. W. Van Hcrgen, 
F. Tilhnann Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. Good- 
fellow. 

Mission Branch, 2.572 Mission street, between 
Twenty-first and Twenty-spco'id street-^.. I-'or re- 
ceipt and payment of (!r-[,r,cit« o-hv 

C. W. Heyer, Managrer. 
Richmond District Branch, 432 Clement 
Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. 
For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
W. C. Heyer. Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 
Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run 
ning hot and cold water: b-iths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms. 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
|2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room Elevator Service 

AXET> LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast 3. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate 



THE ADMIRAL 

146 EAST STREET 
106 large, nicely furnished rooms from 
3Bc to $2 per day, $2 to $5 per week. 

Electric Light and Call Bells, Hot and 
Cold TVater, and Clean, Sanitary Bedding 
in Every Room. Electric Elevator Ser- 
vice. Free Baths. 

FERRY HOUSE 

CORNER EAST AND MISSION STS. 

Opposite Ferry Building 
EARTHQUAKE AND FIREPROOF 
The only house in tlie block between 
Market and Mission streets which was not 
Injured by the great catastrophe of 1906. 
Nice Sunny Furnished Rooms from 25c 
to $2 per day; $1.50 to $6 per week; rooms 
for two persons $2.50 per week. 

BANNERS, REGALIA, ETC. 

Gold Bullion, Silk Embroidered and 
Painted Silk and Satin Banners; Hand 
Embroidered Silk American and Spe- 
cial Flags; Reversible and Ribbon 
Parad* Badges; Silk and Satin Sashes 
and Regalia. All Union Made and 
Manufactured by 
THE WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 
860 Mission St. Phone Kearny 1966 

Patronize Home Industry. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
109STEUARTST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CIGAP CO., rtANUrACTURCBS 

133 HARTFORD ST., S. F. 



S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

MARKET AND 8ANSOME STREETS 

Branches: 624 Van Ness Avenue and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital. $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letters of Credit Issued, payable in ail parts of the world. 
Chas. F. Leege, Pres. W. A. Frederick, Vice-Pres. B. G. TognazzI, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vice-Pres. 



SOMETHING NEAV 

TKe Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 
■• ANTIDOTE. " 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
t a n t Advantages 
wliiih .ail tie found 
In No Other Pipe. 
1 -I h. "ANTI- 
DO TK" needs No 
Breaking In. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
thf tcrrois of the 
first few smokes in 
an onlinnry f'ipe. 
the First Smoke In 
an "ANTIDOTE" 
Is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 

^protects the briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" Is always 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) Is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing It to pass oft Into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

RASSER BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET. S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




Best Suits in Town 

for the money 

at 

Capt.C.J.Swanson 

Up-to-date Clothier 
and Gents' Furnisher 

OilsKins, Gold Seal 

Rubberboots 

Uniforms, Hats and 

Shoes 

Pants a Specialty 

Tlie main essential to working 
pants are good material and gcod 
workmanship. Then, as it costs no 
more, they may as well be properly 
cut. You get all these in "Stag" 
Union-made Trousers, guaranteed 
not to rip. Good for all purposes, 
priced $1 up to $7. 

119 EAST STREET 

Phone Douglas 1082 

San Francisco 




SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light blue) 
appears on the 
you are served. 



^^^*S 




Issued by Autnofiiyof tne Cigar MaKefs' Intefnalional Union ofAmenc 



Union-made Cigars. 

Sto dflliflf?. Ih«1)h«Cl5«!CO<:Ui«i)inlhlsb<»h»«b«nma««lv«n(StCl3SS\lb(Mnall 
aWmlflOf 'HtClCMM»«tlO'lllIUI»AII0IWl.UMI0N(ilAiii«;M. jn oijjniMtioKlcvoled h)l)»ad- 
»jncerr,OTl of ihe MOBoi kwnRWm^ iNmiftlUAl WUtARt Of THt CRAn. TlnwforewtntaumO 
Ihew Qnnn U> ill VTxMen Uiroufit>out lh« Mofkj 

All IntrinQimtnu upon this label wrilbe punished eccordinq to law 

M Ui^uku^. Presu'eiU, 





A "labor carnival and industrial ex- 
hibition" in aid of the building fund of 
the San Francisco Labor Council was 
opened at that city on October 16 and 
will remain open for nine days. 

Announcements were posted in the 
carbarns of the street railway com- 
pany at Omaha on October 4 noti- 
fying all the temporary employes that 
their services would not be needed 
any longer. 

President Lewis, of the United 
Mine Workers' of America, has issued 
a circular showing the present paid- 
up membership of the organization to 
be 262,747. This is a gain of 4,500 over 
the figures of any year since 1904. 

President James M. Lynch, of the 
International Typograpical Union, 
visited San Francisco last week in the 
interest of the printing trades. He 
addressed a special meeting of the 
Typos and allied craftsmen on Octo- 
ber 17. 

The convention of the International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, 
held at Chicago, September 20 to 
October 2, made provision for the re- 
admission of seceding members upon 
payment of the current month's per 
capita tax. 

Suit has been brought against the 
Southern Pacific Railroad at Sparks, 
Xev., to test the constitutionality of 
the "Full Crew Act." Tne complaint 
charges that the railroad has violated 
this newly enacted law in failing to 
have the required six men to consti- 
tute the crew of a fifty-car freight 
train. 

Labor Member Meagher recently 
gave notice ill New South Wales As- 
sembly of his intention to move, 
"That in view of the high prices of 
the necessaries of life, and the in- 
creased cost of rent, raiment, and 
food, the minimum wage to able- 
bodied employes in the Government 
service be 8s. per day." 

The doctors attached to the hospi- 
tals at Vienna have decided to go on 
strike on December IS unless the city 
agrees to their demand for an in- 
crease in salary. Private physicians 
will support the action of their col- 
leagues, so unless an arrangement is 
arrived at by the date set, the Vien- 
nese hospitals will be without medical 
aid. 

The total luiniber of cases of poi- 
soning and of anthrax reported to the 
British Home Office during August, 
was 42, consisting of 38 cases of lead 
poisoning, 1 of mercurial poisoning, 
and 3 cases of anthrax. In addition 
to the above, 17 cases of lead poison- 
ing (5 of which were fatal) were re- 
ported among housepainters and 
plumbers. 

Stoppage of work was proclaimed 
at Trieste, Austria, on October 14, in 
protest against the execution of Fran- 
cisco I'^rrer, and almost universally 
carried out. Only one evening paper 
appeared, and nearly all the shops, 
cafes and theaters were closed. Thou- 
sands of strikers paraded the streets 
with black flags, shouting: "Death 
to Alfonso; death to the Pope." 

A conference between John Moby, 
Secretary of the New Bedford Textile 
Council, and the members of the State 
Board of Conciliation and Arbitration 
was held recently in regard to the 
wage situation in New Bedford. The 
union representatives state that a 
strike of .ill the cotton mill operatives 
is threatened unless a speedy agree- 
ment is reached. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



"Could you learn to love me?" 
"Well, my teachers say I'm l)riglitcr 
than most pupils." 



Bumpology. — Many a man with a 

powerful voice has a dent where his 

bump of intelligence ought t" be. — 
Chicago Xews. 



Those p-oolish Questions. — "Our 
train hit a iiear on the way down." 
"Was the bear on the track?" 
"No; the train had to go into the 
woods after him." — Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 



The Spice of Life. — .\shley — "Do 
you have much variety in your board- 
ing-house?" 

Seymour — "Well, we have three dif- 
ferent iiaiiu's fur the nieals." — Ex- 
change. 



Revised Version.— "What is that old 
adage about 'A penny saved," etc.?" 
(|ueried the youth. 

"A penny saved by the old man 
means a dollar burned by his son in 
after years," answered the wise guy. 
— Chicago Tribune. 



I'i^uring It Out. — "But renumber, 
my dear," he said, "that you and I 
are one." 

She looked at him scornfully. 

"One!" she echoed. "Nonsense! 
We are ten. I'm the one and you 
are the cipher." — Pathfinder. 



Studies in Temperament. — "Don't 
you tiiink that a man is lucky to have 
a good disposition?" 

"I'm not sure," answ'ered Sirius Bar- 
ker. "Sometimes we confuse the 
cause with the effects. A man is like- 
ly to have a good disposition because 
he is lucky." — Washington Star. 



Learned It by Ear.^The dear little 
girl then arose, bowed and recited it 
in this manner: 

'Lettuce Denby up X. Dewing. 

Widow Hartford N. K. I-"ate; 
Still H. E. Ving still per Sue Wing 

Learn to label Aunty Waite." 

Then, with tumultuous ajjjilause of 
the audience ringing in her ears, she 
sat' down in hai)py confusion. — Chi- 
cago Tribune. 



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J. C. ESCHEN W. H. LITTLE 

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Established 1686 



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E. T. COLLINS. Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

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ASENT U. S. GOVERNMENT CH«RT$ IND NAUTICU PUBIICATIONS 
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12 MAR.KET STREET 

ttre of SacramtnIo and Market Sts., SAN FIANCISCO. CAL. 

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Rates Determined by' Transit Observation 
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HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
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Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 



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CAPT. J. G. HlTCHFiELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

This Modern Navigation School has no superior In the world to-day. 
As a practical navigator the Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right experience and ability to teach you up-to-date 
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on most any vessel sailing out of_ this port. ASK TUKM. 

Advice on Maritime T,.iw. Ship's Business and Naturalization FREE. 

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320 MARKET ST., S. F. Visitors WiTlcmne. Telephone Kearny 4686 



SAN FRANCISCO STORE 



Men's 
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$1.10 Each 



Worth Up to $2.50 



This is one of the best job lots of 
shirts VIC have ever been enabled to 
purchase at such a great concession. 
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cut ample and comfortable, neverthe- 
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one is made of an imported cloth and 
is neatly sewed. These shirts are the 
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plaited in narrow or wide tucks. The 
designs vary from the neat and small 
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more showy patterns. 



979 to 987 Market 
25 to 33 Sixth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



PAGE 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Now located at 

82 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Francltco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc.. Boots, Shoes, Rubbai 
Boots and Oil Clothins. Seamen's Outflti 
a specialty. 

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not make a mistake — ^Look for the Name 
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DEFENDER CIGAR STORE 

22 East St., San Francisco. 

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Agent for Sheerin's Laundry. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
Political Printinga Specialty 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

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1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 
2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 



When making purchases from our 
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Seamen's Journal. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seainien's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Qui Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Oiganization. 



VOL. XXIII. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27. 1909. 



Whole No. 2040. 



SWEDISH GENERAL STRIKE. 



IX A COiMAIUNICATION to the Sailors' 
Union of tlie Pacilic, acknowledging receipt 
of a contribution by the latter in aid of the 
Swedish strikers, Mr. Charles Lindley, Secretary 
of the Svenska Transportarbetareforbundet, and 
one of the principal advisers of the Swedish labor 
movement, presents a comprehensive summary of 
the causes leading up to the general strike in 
Sweden and the incidents of that great struggle. 
Mr. Lindley's letter, addressed to Secretary Furu- 
seth, of the Sailors' Union, is as follows: 

You will remember that when you were on a 
visit to Sweden the shipowners had begun a bat- 
tle with us in the north, with the purpose of 
robbing us of the preference to employment for 
union men. At that time this move had culmi- 
nated in, a battle all over Sweden, and the em- 
ployers' associations had decided to declare a 
general lockout on a given day. Then the Gov- 
ernment interfered and brought about an agree- 
ment. • 

The einployers were angry at the Government 
for pressing them to this agreement, believing 

'that if they had been allowed to go on they would 
have been able to smash up the unions, or at the 
least have weakened their political position dur- 
ing the elections that were to come during the 
next month. 

The Government tried to allay this feeling by 
promising the employers that it would help them 
to tight the Socialists. But the Government 
speeches seem to have been regarded in the op- 
posite way, as the result v,-as that we doubled our 
number in Parliament. 

The employers' organizations had in the mean- 
time found out that they had every chance to 
create lockouts during those bad times. Threat 
succeeded threat. After threatening several minor 
trades, they told the workers in the machine and 
engineering trades that they would be locked out 
for an indefinite time if they did not agree to ex- 
tend their agreement for another five years. It 
being the first of January, with bad times and a 
large number of unemployed, there was nothing 

• else to do but to accept the employers' proposi- 
tion. 

After this came the employers in the building 
trades, and demanded that we accept reduced 
wages and longer hours of work, or be locked out. 
We then decided to take the risk, and at the worst 
answer with a general strike. The employers, 
realizing this, drew back. But there are two 
employers' organizations, one for the building 
trades and one for all the industrial employers. 
Then the latter started again and locked out the 
tailors, the roadbuilders and the iron and steel 
millworkers. 

.-.The chief point in dispute was a reduction of 
wages. Seeing that the workers did not give in, 

,the employers decided to throw out 80,000 men 
and women in different trades, and, if this was 
not sufficient, to throw out still greater numbers 
of workers in- such trades as the employers' or- 
ganization might decide upon until the workers 
had signed an agreement that the employers 
should coiisidei- satisfactory. 

Well, what could and ought we to do on an oc- 
casion like this? To capitulate was to crush the 
spirit out of the organized workers. To stand 



still and let the employers only throw out and 
for us to keep those that were thrown out, was 
no policy either, as the employers distinctly had 
said that if those already thrown out did not 
prove sufficient, then they would throw out still 
more. We would only have weakened ourselves 
still more in futile attempts to maintain those 80,- 
000. Taking all those things into consideration, 
we decided to strike a quick blow by declaring 
a general strike among all the workers of Sweden. 

The workers followed the call in splendid style. 
The 4th of August will always be remembered as 
a great day in Sweden. The manifest from the 
Trades Federation asked every organized worker 
belonging to the Federation to stop work, with 
the exception of those who were engaged at the 
water works, gas works and sanitary workers or 
attendants upon animals. With very few excep- 
tions, they all came out. Besides these a very 
large number of unorganized workers also stopped 
work and came out, making about 300,000 work- 
ers out in the general strike. 

To give the proportion, I might mention that, 
according to the statistics of Sweden, we do not 
have more than 550,000 industrial workers in the 
whole country, and many of these are engaged in 
small numbers in small country places where 
there is no chance to organize them. Besides 
this we had, outside the Trades Federation, two 
unions who did not partake in this general strike, 
namely: the railwaymen and the typografs (com- 
positors and printers). 

There has been a lot of talk about a general 
strike, but it has come to our lot to practise it. 
Most of us have thought that if such a thing 
could be arranged it would only be a question 
of a week or a fortnight at the utmost. But here 
we see that we must reckon upon months. The 
capitalists and the middle class rushed in a fran- 
tic scare and bought up all available foodstuff 
and weapons of defense. Troops were stationed 
all over the country ready to charge if there was 
any occasion. But they did not have anything to 
do, as the workers kept up the most perfect order, 
electing their own patrolmen to keep order. 

Everything was brought to a complete stand- 
still. The trams, carts, cabs and passenger boats 
stopped running. The factory wheel? stopped 
making a noise. We began to feel that humanity 
had got a long-looked-for holiday. The sun was 
shining and the air was warm and the workers 
took their families with them and went out into 
the woods, preparing for the semester that they 
haven't had for years. The horse got a holiday 
as well for the first time. 

There was no occasion for any disturbances by 
the workers. The work was stopped, and that 
was sufficient. Then the capitalistic papers began 
to rage — Liberals as well as Tories. Through the 
.general strike, a lot of Liberal tradesmen and 
shopkeepers began . to lose very heavily or in 
other ways got into a tight fix. This brought all 
the Liberals and Conservatives into one hostile 
camp. There is no animal more wild than a 
bourgeoise when his economic interests are in 
. danger. Their papers were fairly raging, and 
calling upon the Government to take steps to 
protect those who were willing to work and call- 
ing upon the capitalist and the middle class to 
■ "volunteer." 

The first thing to get started was the street 
transportation. Engineers and others were placed 



on the tramcars, on the cabs and on the passen- 
ger steamers, who kept up the traffic. Then the 
papers began shouting, "See, the general strike is 
broken!" and this was transmitted into the for- 
eign press. 

We then considered it necessary to ask the 
printers to stop work, so as to bring an end to 
this traffic and let the general strike be felt with- 
out newspaper comments. This the compositors 
were willing to do upon one condition, and that 
was that they would stop work upon all papers, 
Conservative, Liberal and Socialist. We have 
about fourteen daily Socialist labor papers in our 
country. This we agreed to upon condition that 
we be allowed to send out a daily report contain- 
ing all the news of the strike. 

This was the only great mistake that we made 
during the battle. The papers were not stopped. 
They were able to come out with the help of fore- 
men, blacklegs and linotype machines, now still 
madder than before and resembling a disturbed 
nest of wasps. But the worst of it was that we 
had cut our own tongues. The labor press could 
not start with blacklegs or get the printers to 
alter their decision. 

Time went on. No support was given during 
the first fourteen days, but after that time there 
were lots of families actually starving. We were 
then compelled to support the most needy, and 
this called for enormous sums. An appeal had 
been sent out at the beginning of the battle to 
all countries through the international secretariat 
in Germany. 

Geruiany very soon organized the supply of 
economic support, which will ever be remembered 
in this country. But before Germany came the 
closely allied countries, Denmark and Norway, 
who from the very first week began to levy upon 
their members up to one krona {27 cents) per 
week, in support of. the Swedish strike. Still this 
was insufficient, so we could only give about 
three kroners per man per week. 

The difficulty to provide financial support, 
coupled with a declaration from the Government, 
to the effect that they would not arbitrate until 
those who had broken their contract went back 
to work, the communal local authorities, em- 
ployes and the printers, made the Trades Federa- 
tion executive decide, to allow every one to go 
back to work who was engaged by employers 
who did not belong to the Employers' Federa- 
tion, which had inaugurated the lockout. 

This position has now been in force for about 
three weeks, and during this time negotiations 
have been going on between the employers and 
the workers' Trade Federation. But the employ- 
ers still maintain that we should accept reductions 
in wages, and besides this agree upon a future 
basis for negotiations which among other things 
contains certain paragraphs that must always be 
accepted by the workers in all the new agree- 
ments, besides making the unions responsible for 
their members' acts, morally and financially, etc. 

There is no possibility . of our accepting such 
conditions, so we said no and broke off the nego- 
tiations. There is still an enormous number of 
men out. Besides the 80,000 that the Employers' 
I'^deration has locked out, there are some 10,000 
or 12,C00 who have been victimized. We have 
given all orders to try to get back to work, but 
the employers will not take back those locked out 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



STORY OF "KING HERRING." 



Of the whole tribe of fishes none con- 
tributes so largely to the support of the hu- 
man race as the herring. It is more exten- 
sively preyed upon by marine enemies than 
probably any other fish. It is absolutely 
without means of defense. Wherever it is 
found, in the North Atlantic as well as in 
the Pacific, it is caught by the hundreds of 
millions for commerce. For over two cen- 
turies the fisheries of the east coast of North 
America and for a much longer period those of 
the North Sea have maintained an immense 
food-producing industry, and they show no 
sign of exhaustion. 

If every mature female herring lays 20,- 
000 eggs, a very conservative estimate, and 
more than two of the progeny escape de- 
struction and spawn, says Hugh M. Smith, 
United States Deputy Commissioner of 
Fisheries, in the National Geographic Maga- 
zine, more fish will be produced than are 
necessary for maintaining the schools. The 
destruction done by man is really insignifi- 
cant, possibly not 5 per cent of the annual 
loss due to whales, porpoises, seals and other 
mammals, to cod, haddock, mackerel, sharks 
and other fishes, and to gulls and other birds 
and natural enemies that prey on the her- 
ring while still in the egg. 

Huxley held that the entire annual take 
of the herring in Europe did not number 
more fish than a single one of many schools 
contains. Putting the world's annual pro- 
duction at about 2,495,000,000 pounds, with 
a value of $36,000,000 at first hands, Mr. 
Smith estimates that the annual destruc- 
tion of herring by man exceeds 10,900,000,- 
000 fish, or seven fish to every person in the 
world. In one brush weir near Castine, Me., 
in October and November last year 20,000,- 
000 small herring were taken for canning in 
the "sardine" factories. More than 1,000,- 
000,000 herring are caught annually in Can- 
ada. 

But the herring industry of Scotland ex- 
ceeds that of any other country, being 50 
per cent larger than that of England, which 
ranks second. In 1907 the catch of Scot- 
land was more than 630,000,000 pounds, 
enough fish, if put end to end to extend 8,000 
miles. Five hundred steam vessels were 
employed. France, Norway and Sweden 
have enormous herring fisheries. As long 
ago as the fifteenth century there were 50,- 
000 Dutch herring fishermen, and between 
200,000 and 300,000 people were engaged on 
shore in related industries, such as boat 
building and net and barrel making. "The 
foundations of Amsterdam are laid on her- 
ring bones," the old saying ran, for when in 
the Aliddle Ages all Continental Europe ate 
no animal food during Lent but fish, the 
Dutch supplied most of the cured fish. 

In 1677 the Duke of York formed a cor- 
poration for the catching of herring. In 
1720 2,000 of the principal gentlemen of 
Scotland organized a company for herring 
fishing. Charles I hastened his downfall by 
his attempt to interfere with the privilege 
of free fishing off the American coast and 
then levying "ship money" on the fishing 
and merchant vessels at home. It was once 
the custom to take in pomp the first herring 
to the King at The Hague, where the lucky 
fisherman received a present of 500 florins 
at the royal hands. To fresh herring, fried, 
broiled or baked, and to herring salted, 
pickled, smoked or canned in oil or mus- 



tard, men of many nations to-day delight 
to render hungry homage. In its own right 
this small fish is entitled to wear the name 
of "King Herring." — New York World. 



OIL IN BRITISH NAVY. 



It is curious that the British naval authori- 
ties should have abandoned oil fuel at a mo- 
ment when in foreign fleets it has been de- 
cided that its advantages are so considerable 
as to make it desirable to abandon coal in 
these smaller craft. It is probable that there 
is one simple explanation of the change in 
Admiralty policy. The British Empire has 
very limited resources of oil fuel, and at 
present the supplies of the navy have to be 
obtained from abroad. These supplies may 
be cut off in time of war, and, therefore, the 
Admiralty are compelled to sink consider- 
able capital in reserve stores of fuel. The 
British Navy already possesses a large num- 
ber of ships which make large demands for 
oil fuel. All the later capital ships of the 
navy carry oil fuel in addition to coal, and 
for some years past all torpedo craft have 
been fitted exclusively for the use of liquid 
fuel. Apparently the Admiralty have decid- 
ed that, in view of the present limited sources 
of supply and their liability to interfer- 
ence, it is an act of statesmanship not to 
commit the navy further in this direction. 
There is every reason to hope that in the 
near future additional supplies of oil fuel will 
l)e available with the British Empire, and 
then presumably the Admiralty will revert 
once more to its use in new ships. No one 
who has any knowledge of the performances 
of the oil fuel burning craft of recent con- 
struction doubts that this agent possesses 
very great advantages over coal. It is more 
easily taken on board, and its use results 
in a considerable saving of labor. — Cassier's 
Magazine. 



EMIGRATION FROM SWITZERLAND. 



The total emigration from Switzerland 
during the year 1908 was 3,656, the smallest 
since 1894. The details follow: 

As 5,710 Swiss emigrated in 1907, the de- 
crease was about 36 per cent. Those go- 
ing to the United States last year numbered 
2,853, while only 577 went to Canada, Mex- 
ico, Central and South America. The de- 
crease in emigration to these last-named 
countries was quite 50 per cent, while to 
the United States it was but 8 per cent. This 
is somewhat remarkable in view of the fact 
that certain of the Central and South Ameri- 
can States have been making active efforts 
to attract emigration from Switzerland. 

Young and sturdy farmers, as the Swiss 
emigrants mostly are, they naturally turn 
their faces toward that country where agri- 
culture flourishes. They are a reading and 
intelligent people, and arc presumably aware 
of the fact that during the recent financial 
crisis agricultural interests suffered less than 
any others in the United States. In 1908 
Swiss emigrants secured letters of credit be- 
fore their departure, payable in the countries 
to which they were bound, amounting to 
$51,908. 

The loss to Switzerland by emigration 
was more than counterbalanced by the num- 
ber of immigrants from Austria-Hungary, 
Italy, the Balkan States, and Russia; the 
total immigration in 1908 being 19,000. 



PROPOSAL TO FILL EAST RIVER. 



That is a unique and startling suggestion 
of Thomas A. Edison to fill up the East 
River and cut a canal across the western 
part of Long Island to take its place. By 
this suggestion Manhattan would be largely 
increased in size, thus relieving the conges- 
tion which prevails at present, and New 
York and Brooklyn would be joined by solid 
land. More than this, it would do away 
with Hell Gate, with all its dangers, and 
leave it but a reminiscence. It is claimed 
for this suggestion that it is entirely feasi- 
ble and would very largely increase the dock- 
age facilities by means of the canal. At 
present Manhattan can not expand except 
upward, and the limit of upward expansion 
will soon be reached. A very good slice of 
San Francisco has been made by filling in 
the bay and now Seattle is spreading itself 
in the same way. To-day New York is the 
greatest city in the world in commerce and 
finance, if not in population. It must find 
some way to relieve the congestion, that 
will grow to the danger point unless relief 
be found. To fill in East River would be 
an undertaking almost equal to that of build- 
ing the Panama canal, yet it is not too great 
for such a city as New York to carry 
through. Engineers, backed by capital, are 
undertaking vast things in these modern 
days, and nothing appears to be beyond their 
ability to accomplish. Fifty years ago the 
present New York subway system would 
have been looked upon as the disordered 
dream of an enthusiast, yet it is now a real- 
ity. 

Tunneling the Alps was a dream of cen- 
turies until the engineers of the nineteenth 
century accomplished it. We may smile at 
the enthusiasm of Edison to-day, but the 
next generation may walk from New York 
to Brooklyn on dry land. A year or so ago 
everybody but wild dreamers laughed at the 
idea of men flying in the air like birds, yet 
we talk of great battles to come between 
airships as if such battles were imminent. 
All great inventions, all great engineering 
feats are the work of dreamers. Who now 
laughs at the idea of navigating the air, or 
even of fighting battles with airships? 
Who now laughs at the idea of sending mes- 
sages through the air across seas and land? 
Why, then, should we laugh at the sugges- 
tion of filling up East River? — Washington 
Post. 



TEXTILE WORKERS' WAGES. 



The British Board of Trade inquiry into 
workpeople's wages and hours of work in 
1906 has resulted in the publication of a 
volume dealing with the textile trades. 
Additional volumes are promised later in 
regard to other industries. The facts in 
the first volume, as summarized, show the 
following interesting figures: Textile work- 
ers in United Kingdom, 1,171,000, of whom 
482,000 were men and 689,000 women. The 
total wages paid in 1906 amounted to over 
$240,000,000, or an average per head of 
$211.68. The average for men per week 
was $6.83, for women $3.75, for boys $2.53, 
and for girls $2.17. 



"Burglar proof" plate glass, made by a 
firm at Rheims, France, is said to have with- 
stood blows from a steel-shod mallet and 
revolver shots, in tests, without breaking. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







■ 1 


*^^* 




On the Atlantic Coast. 

( Contributed by the Atlantic Giast Seamen's Unions. ) | 


^^^^* 






1 



MISSISSIPPI STEAMBOATING. 



•If difficulty has been experienced in navi- 
gating the Missouri it is because through 
long disuse its bed has become blocked in 
places with trees and snags. This has 
caused the water to seek other channels. 
But the Government has wakened to the 
necessity of clearing away these obstacles. 
Government snag boats have been working 
for nearly a year between Kansas City and 
St. Louis. Last year business men of Kan- 
sas City organized a boat company and suc- 
cessfully carried freight and passengers be- 
tween the two cities. There was no profit 
in the business for the reason that the boats 
could run only in the daytime, and even 
then they had to be guided carefully and 
slowly. But the experiment proved to the 
satisfaction of Congress that the river is 
navigable and needed only the attention that 
any other self-respecting river should have. 
It was the strongest influence in getting 
an appropriation to pay for improvement 
work, and it opened the way for the large 
scheme of transportation now maturing in 
Kansas City. 

This scheme contemplates the organizing 
of a transportation company with a capital 
of $L000,000. Walter S. Dickey, experi- 
enced in executive and organizing work, was 
chosen general manager, William Rockhill 
Nelson subscribed to the first $50,000 in 
stock and Mr. Dickey took a like amount. 
Other subscriptions already amount to near- 
ly one-half the required amount, and con- 
tracts for freight have been signed which 
assure the success of the undertaking. — 
Technical World Magazine. 



ELECTRICITY ON MAURETANIA. 



A writer in the Electrical Review of Lon- 
don gives an interesting account of the im- 
portant parts played by electricity in de- 
veloping the great speed attained by the 
.Mauretania. He says : 

"Without in any way reflecting upon the 
abilities of the engineers, it must be admit- 
ted that they did not seem to have grasped 
the great possibilities of the various auxilia- 
ries on the ship; and it is attention to these 
auxiliaries which determines the ultimate 
fulfillment of the designers' ideas. 

"As is now well known, practically all 
the auxiliary machinery on the Mauretania 
is electrically driven. . . . and it is 
equally well known, especially among elec- 
trical engineers connected with shipwork, 
that marine engineers have a stubborn and 
conservative objection to anything other 
than the steam-driven plant with which they 
have been brought up. When, therefore, an 
electrical installation of more than 2000 
horse-power was thrust upon them with 
])ractically no qualified electricians on board 
to enlighten thein as to its proper usage, 
they naturally felt some trepidation, and had 
little desire to attempt any record speeds. 

"Perhaps it is not quite evident why the 
speed of the ship should entirely depend on 
the auxiliary plant, and in explanation it 
must be said that practically all fast boats 
require a relatively enormous quantity of 
steam at high pressure, which can only be 



obtained from the boilers when high-power 
forced-draft fans are employed to supply air 
to the furnaces, and a slight diminution in 
their output has an immediate effect on the 
steam pressure of the boilers, and conse- 
quently on the speed of the engines and 
propellers. In the case of the Mauretania 
the forced-draft fans are electrically driv- 
en." 

According to the writer, the entire de- 
pendence of the boat's speed on the electric 
generating plant is now thoroughly under- 
stood and one of the first considerations is 
to keep up the voltage. Before this, it 
might drop 10 or 15 per cent and the only 
result was a dim light and the slowing down 
of a few unimportant motors — but on the 
Mauretania it is vital. In conclusion, we 
read : 

"It is strange, on the face of it, that such 
apparently small details should be the 
means of converting a twenty-three-knot 
boat into one of twenty-six knots ; but it 
i? no exaggeration to say that the records of 
the Mauretania are entirely due to a better 
understanding of the electrical conditions." 



HEIGHT OF WAVES. 



A puzzling question to all seagoers — 
that of the lengthened height of ocean waves 
and how to measure them — is answered by 
the Navy Hydrographic Office in a recent 
publication. Determination of the length of 
waves at sea may be obtained by direct 
comparison of the length of the observing ves- 
sel with the length from crest to crest of the 
waves over which she is riding, and when ships 
are sailing in company, a good estimate of the 
length of the waves may be made by compar- 
ing the known length of a neighboring ship 
from the distance from crest to crest of the 
successive waves. 

Another method of measuring the length 
of waves consists in towing a log line astern 
of a vessel and noting the length of the line 
when a buoy attached to the after end 
floats on the next wave crest abaft that on 
which the stern of the vessel momentarily 
floats. 

Replying to an answer regarding the 
height of ocean waves, the Hydrographic 
Office says its measurements and estimates 
from mariners and observers at sea indi- 
cate that the average height of all the waves 
running in a gale in the open ocean is about 
twenty feet. 

"About forty feet," it says, "is a common 
estimate of the height of the large waves in 
a severe gale on the North Atlantic, and 
this estimate is really not compatible with a 
recorded average of a little more than 
twenty feet." 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anton Jacobsen, a native of Stavanger, 
Norway, is inquired for by his brother, John 
Jacobsen. Address, Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union, Mobile, Ala. 



Demand the Hatters' label when buying a 



hat. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, lyi 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 85 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Uunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull, 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Scemannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 

Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

Denmark. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zecmansbond, 2 e 
Atjchstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 

Austria. 

Vcrband der Handels-Transport, Vcrkehrsar- 
beitcr und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques v pucrto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, I (Bar- 
celoneta) Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvetto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Several women in Uol'and now earn 
a living as practicing chemists. 

Port Pirie unionists in South .Aus- 
tralia have started a co-operative 
union woodyard. 

Members of the Bricklayers' Labor- 
ers' Union at Perth (West Australia) 
have struck for 10s. per day. 

Last Year's Eight Hours' demon- 
stration in Sydney, Australia, showed 
a net profit from the sports and art 
union of £2023. 

New Zealand carpenters and joiners 
are taking steps to prevent the impor- 
tation of American machine-manufac- 
tured joinery. 

The Australasian Council of the 
Federated Seamen's Union has sen- 
sibly decided to send an Australasian 
delegate to the International Seamen's 
Congress to be held in 1910. 

Australian Federal Labor members 
have vigorously denounced the indus- 
trial resolutions agreed to at the 
Premiers' Conference, describing them 
to be , such only as might emanate 
from a meeting of employers. 

Exclusive of seamen, the number of 
British workpeople reported as killed 
in the course of their employment 
during August, was 209, a decrease of 
4 as compared with July, and of 65 
as compared with a year ago. 

The changes in hours of British la- 
bor reported as taking effect in 
August, 1909, affected 800 workpeople, 
of whom 400 had their working time 
increased by 808 hours per week, and 
400 had an aggregate reduction of 720 
hours per week. 

The net result of all the changes in 
British wages taking effect in August 
was a decrease of £421 per week, as 
compared with a decrease of £619 per 
week in July, and one of £3,140 in 
August, 1908. The number of work- 
people afTected was 13,088. 

We are informed, says the Gayndah 
(Australia) Gazette, that the German 
settlers on the Binjour Plateau who 
have been employed by the Govern- 
ment for some time past in road- 
clearing work, have struck, demanding 
a higher rate of pay for their work. 

The ballot to decide on a printers' 
strike at Melbourne, Australia, for a 
minimum wage of £3 per week for 
compositors and letterpress machin- 
ists resulted as follows: Yes, 672; no, 
171. Unless their demands be ac- 
ceded to the men will cease work. 

Should the present dispute in the 
Victorian printing trade not be settled 
amicably, and the Melbourne printers 
are compelled to strike for a fair 
wage, steps will be taken to force the 
daily papers to publish nothing derog- 
atory to the men who may be called 
out on strike. 

Returns received from certain se- 
lected British ports (at which 83 per 
cent of the total tonnage in the 
foreign trade is entered and cleared), 
show that during August 42,765 sea- 
men, of whom 3,797 (or 8.9 per cent) 
were foreigners, were shipped on 
foreign-going vessels. 

At a meeting of the combined 
unions committee at^^Broken Hill, Aus- 
tralia, recently, it was decided to rec- 
ommend to the nev^f' committee the 
consideration of a proposition by the 
Barrier Labor Federation that in fu- 
ture troubles only unionists of twelve 
months' standing shall be eligible for 
strike pay, or, if not twelve months 
in the place, those who have been 
r unionists from the date of receiving 
their first pay in Broken Hill. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



L IPPM AN 


BROS. 


S32 BEACON & S31 FRONT, next 


to Fritz & Ernest 


SAN PEDRO CAL. 




COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 


OUTFITTERS 


Un on Goods for Union 


Men 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 




SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All Boods sold at lowest S:<n Kr;ini-isio prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to Inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Franci-sco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




'^^^ISTER^'^ 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 



him. Loosi labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



W ALK-OV ER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



San Pedro Letter List, 

Andersen, -1U5.0. I.ol'inan, K. 

Andersen, Peter F. Lelitonen, .John 

Alander, K. l.,und, if. K. 

Abhors. Arno I^aiio. Einil 
Albertsen, Johannes L,ercli, Paul 

Andersen, Kinar Xlaguire, Thomas 

Andeisson, Axel McKenzie, James 

Amnel. Albert Murie, Martin 

Buchtman, F. Mellin, Kdward 

Bontsen, Axel Mygitid, W. F. 

Brose, R. Mesak. Edward 

Belli ens. E. A. Xeulin;;, Albert 

Boylan, Cnris. J. Nielsen, Svend 

Bietilti, Th. -1338 Nordman, John D. 

Bower, Gosta O.sses, A. 

Brogard, Nils Olsen, Th. 

Comstedt, Ernst Olsen, O. -537 

Carlsson, C. Odman, Gus 
Christiansen, HaroldOtto, John 
Christiansen, G.-1054Oseses, W. A. 

Dahlberg, J. H. Petersen, S. R. 

Eckhardt, W. I'oterson. K. E., -903 

Engberg, Oscar Petersen, H. -1064 

Ek, Thure Peterson, L,aurltz 

Eriokson, John Pedersen, Gert C. 

Fay, Joe Pedersen, Alfred 
Fredericksen, Harry Pederson, Reinhold 

Fisher. -556 Peterson, Hans 

Folvik, Carl Rudland, Jakob 

Fleming, John Reed, L. C. 

Fasig, Don R:ismussen, E. 
Gabrielsen, K. -001 Scott, E. G. (pkg.) 

C.Hsk, A. Schwitzer, H. 

Gorsesen, Emil San, B. -2113 

Glausen, Harry Soarabosla. M. 

Guenther, Richard Seniberg, Jf. 

Heggum, Louis Sorensen, A. 
Hermanson. K. -15o4Steen, J. C. 

Hansen, Theodor Solie, Ingvald 

Hilke, Carl Svenssen, Nikolaus 

Hesse, Erick Sindahl, J. 

Haggenmuller, H. Syversen, Ole 

Hansen, Peter K. Stalsten, Karl 

Haarklau, I. Sandstrom. J. -1347 

Hansen. Carl Strahle, Charles 
Heinanen, C. (pkg.)Southerland, A. 

Johansen, C. -IISI Svendsen, C. -1050 

Johanson, J. -880 Swanson. Charles 

Jorgensen, B. Tommis, Frank 

Kuhne, W. • Tufvesson, J. 

Koch, Car! Trepetket, Frank 

Keinanen. Emll Touanne. Walter 

Klappe, J. Veyvoda, Frank 

Kristiansen, Eigil Quinn, W. 

Kraushatz, F. Wahrenheit, Otto 

Karl, Matti W ycligel, J. 

Krohn. J. A. Wahlstedt, R. -778 

Larson. I.,. Westerlund, T. F. 
Louis, Mickel 



JACOB OUSBN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 



Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran 
Cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., DPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C L. MUNSON 

Dealer In 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 




Named shoes are frequently made In Non- 
Union factories. 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what Its name, unless It bears a 
plain and readable Impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP are 
always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence of 
the UNION STAMP. 




Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tolxn, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



INFORMATION WANTED. j,.j,„es Sample, last heard of on ship 

Samuel England, age 48 years, com- i Santa Rita in .April, 1909, is inquired 
municate with Seamen's Institute, 242 for by Seamen's Institute, 242 Steuart 
Steuart street, San Francisco. street. 



The salvage claim originating 
through the SS. Curacao and SS. 
Australian has been adjusted. All 
money due the crew who were aboard 
the vessel at the time the Australian 
was assisted will be found in the man- 
ager's office, 112 Market street. Par- 
ties applying for such money will first 
apply to the head of their respective 
department for identification. The 
names of the men are as follows: !• 
.Mason, A. Mondini, R. Nelson, J. 
Jonasen, J. Lorenz, C. Swenson, H. 
Nelson, F. Rebases, C. Chidley. 

Wm. McLaughlin, Julius Franz, K. 
Grunert, J. Koglund, W. VVickstrom 
and C. Christensen, who were mem- 
bers of the crew of the schooner Min- 
nie E. Caine at the time of her wreck, 
are inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The American ship Acme, which sailed from 
San Francisco on June 17 for New York and 
Phihidelphia, was spoken on October 20 in latitude 
38 north, longitude 7Z west. 

The birthday of the German Empress was 
honored by the warships of six nations — the 
United States, Great Britain, Italy, The Nether- 
lands, Japan and Germany — in San Francisco Bay 
on October 22. 

This year to date the shipments of Puget Sound 
lumber to Panama have amounted to 30,000,000 
feet, and it is estimated that in addition to the 
orders now on hand the canal will take 15,000,000 
feet before the end of the year. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 21: Steamer Harriet Norton, William 
Peunone vice S. J. Norton; steamer Sea Fox, D. 
C. Thomsen vice George H. Mawdsly. 

A suit in admiralty was filed in the United 
States District Court at San Francisco on October 
22 by the Pacific Shipyard and Ways Company 
against the barge Atlantic to recover $978.44 for 
labor and material used in repairs. 

The whaling stations at Sechart and Kyuquot, 
nn the West Coast of Vancouver Islands, which 
will soon close down for the winter, have taken 
a total of 647 whales this season. Sechart took 
338 and Kyuquot 309. 

The first four of eighteen cases of illegal fencing 
.if Government land by prominent Wyoming stock 
men were disposed of on October 19 in the Fed- 
eral Court at Cheyenne. Two cases were dis- 
missed and two ranchmen were fined $200 each. 

The following changes of masters were recorded 
nt the San Francisco Custom-house on October 
22: Steamer Brooklyn, Johannes Olson vice H. G. 
Hansen; steamer Petroleum, John W. Spencer 
vice H. M. Hughes; steamer J. Marhofifer, George 
Winkel vice J. E. Johnson. 

Under the new arrangement of the Japanese 
ship subsidy the Osaka Shosen Kaisha, the com- 
pany which is operating a new line of steamers 
between Seattle and Tacoma and the Orient in 
connection with the Chicago, Milwaukee and 
Puget Sound Railway, will receive a bonus of 
$500,000 for its American service. 

The German ship Adolf, bound from St. Vin- 
cent for Port Townsend, has put into Monte- 
video, according to advices received at San Fran- 
cisco on October 21, in a damaged condition. 
Her cargo had shifted and her rigging was in a 
bad condition. It is reported that twenty days 
will be required to efifect repairs. 

The steam-schooner Chehalis, Captain Kittle- 
son, will attempt to get the schooner Ensign off 
the beach at Naples. The Chehalis has on board 
a lot of tackle, and if weather conditions are 
sood it is expected that the Ensign will be 
Inated. The insurance companies recently sold 
;ie schooner to Charles Foster. 

The wrecking of the steamer Daniel Kern, 
which was sunk by the steamer George W. Elder 
near Brookfield, Or., in seventy feet of water, 
has been completed and she is now in drydock at 
Portland for repairs. The work was directed by 
Captain Theodore Knulsen, a professional 
wrecker of Duluth, who came out from the East 
for the purpose. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
■ corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 18: Steamer Crowley No. 6, Axel John- 
son vice Frank McGrath; steamer Crowley No. 8, 
Frank A. Long vice Willard Rupert; steamer 
Crolomo, George H. Mawdsley vice R. Dabel. 
The barkentine Arago, C. S. Semsen master, was 
enrolled. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the custom-house yesterday: Steamer 
Santa Rosa, E. Alexander vice J. O. Faria; 
steamer San Jose, H. Thompson vice Ryland 
Drenan; steamer J. C. Elliott, J. F. Chlemens vice 
Louis Hackmeier. The schooner Modoc, J. H. 
Ticdeman master, and the steamer Coronado, 
Svend Stangeland master, were enrolled. 

The 18,000-ton steamship Cleveland, of the 
Hamburg-American line, left New York October 
16 on a round-the-world cruise, which will end at 
San Francisco in the latter part of February. The 
Cleveland has on board on the unique tour 600 
passengers and when she leaves San Francisco in 
February, 1910, homeward bound, she is expected 
to carry 100 more than this number. 

An ocean race from Honolulu to San Fran- 
cisco was begun on October 9 when the barken- 
tine Irmgard and the bark R. P. Rithet were 
towed out of the harbor and spread their sails 
at almost the same minute to catch a breeze th^t 
would start them on their way to the Coast. 
Both the Rithet and the Irmgard are reckoned 
speedy vessels and the race should be a close 
one. 

The United States Army transport Sheridan 
made good records for wireless communication on 
her recent trip from San Francisco to the Philip- 
pines and return via Nagasaki. This ship, accord- 
ing to a report to the Quartermaster-General's De- 
partment, received and transmitted wireless mes- 
^.•^ges 3500 miles from North Head, Wash., while 
-he was between Guam and Honolulu on her re- 
turn. 



Negotiations have been practically completed 
at Honolulu by the terms of which the Matson 
Navigation Company will acquire the barkcntines 
Irmgard and S. G. Wilder. A statement to this 
efifect is made by F. A. Schaefer, head of the 
firm of F. A. Schaefer & Co., Ltd., the present 
owners, and confirmed by T. H. Petrie, secretary 
of Castle & Cook, Ltd., agents for the Matson 
Company. 

United States Fisheries Commissioner George 
M. Bovvers has announced that he has selected 
the following sites for the six new fish hatcheries 
on Puget Sound authorized by Congress: One 
main station to be located, in all probability, at 
Concrete, on Baker River; one near Seattle, and 
auxiliary stations at Quilcene, on the middle fork 
of the Nooksack River; at Birdsview, on Skagit 
River, and on Puyallup River. 

Of the steamers in the Government coal fleet 
to the Pacific this season from the Atlantic 
Coast, the British tramp Baron Napier, Captain 
Kennedy, which has just arrived on the Sound, 
has made the smartest passage. She was sixty- 
six days steaming from Newport News to Puget 
Sound. The Baron Napier is on her maiden 
voyage from Glasgow, and her performance is a 
source of satisfaction to her owners and officers. 

The following changes of masters were recorded 
at the San Francisco Custom-house on October 
19: Schooner J. J. Stofen, Knud Nelson vice 
Jens Anderson; steamer Raymond, John A. W. 
Carlson vice C. A. Knudson; steamer Winehaven, 
Charles Johnson vice J. M. Dixon. The steamers 
Rainier, C. G. Lundquist master; and Ada War- 
ren. P. Collins master, and the schooner Wing 
and Wing, E. Erickson master, were enrolled. 

The new auxiliary schooner Neptune, being con- 
structed for a Hamburg company to be used for 
trading in the South Seas, was launched at Oak- 
land, Cal., on October 16. The Neptune is a trim 
little schooner with a tonnage of 150 tons, a keel 
106 feet long, and 11 feet deep, with a beam of 
26 feet. The Neptune has been constructed to 
take the place of the trading schooner Gazelle, 
which was lost on a reef near Gabriel Island last 
January. 

The sealing schooner Pescawha, the second of 
this year's northern fleet to return, is back at 
Victoria, B. C, from the otter grounds ofif the 
Alaskan, Behring Sea and Copper Island sealing 
grounds, and Captain Balcom and the crew are 
preparing a claim to be made to Washington for 
alleged illegal sealing up of the firearms of the 
vessel by the United States revenue-cutter Bear, 
which ended the sea otter hunting. The Pescawha 
brought only two otter skins and 873 sealskins. 

The steam-schooner Saginaw, which arrived at 
San F"rancisco on October 22, ninety hours from 
Aberdeen, lost nearly her entire deckload of lum- 
ber in a severe hurricane encountered ofT Cape 
Blanco on the 20th. For several hours the ves- 
sel had a hard time of it struggling against the 
terrific wind and tremendous seas which pounded 
over her. The lashings holding the lumber on 
deck could not withstand the strain of the thun- 
dering combers and at last gave way. precipitating 
into the sea about 100,000 feet of lumber. 

Charles P. Doe, of the North Pacific Steamship 
Company, has purchased the st-eamer Santa Clara 
from the Alaska Steamship Company. The vessel 
is now in drydock at Seattle and will be turned 
over to the new owner after being cleaned and 
painted and having a new rudder post installed. 
The purchase price is withheld. The Santa Clara 
will be operated in connection with the George 
W. Elder and the Roanc^ke, but whether the ves- 
sel will run from Portland to San Francisco or 
between Eureka and San Francisco has not. yet 
been announced. 

To meet the heavy demands of the increasing 
passenger trafific between San Francisco and the 
northern Coast ports, two new first-class steel 
passenger steamers are being constructed for the 
San Francisco and Portland Steamship Company, 
an ofifshoot of the Pacific Mail Steamship Com- 
pany, by the Newport News Shipbuilding Com- 
pany at Newport News, Va. One of the vessels, 
which will be sister-ships, was launched on Octo- 
ber 16 and christened the Bear. The second 
steamer, to be named the Beaver, will be launched 
some time in November. 



To Mariners: You will please take notice that 
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 
has installed and is maintaining between San 
Pedro and Terminal Island, one (1) subaqueous 
telephone and telegraph cable, 750 feet in length. 
That at said points said company will maintain 
monuments indicating the place where said cable 
lies. Do not drop anchor at these points. San 
Pedro, Cal., December, 1907. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
IMiA Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., iy2A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 50 Union St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADEl^PHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS. La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 213 Banks Ave. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 305 French St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 63 East Kinzie SL 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO. Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 8 Judson-St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Praser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water SL 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - Jl.OO 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all eommunications of a business nature to the 
Bus-iness Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers -will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the express^ions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 27, 1909. 



CALL FOR SEAMEN'S CONVENTION. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 
Boston, Mas.s., October 13, 1909. 
To all Affiliated Unions : Greeting — 

In pursuance of the Constitution of the 
International Seamen's Union of America, I 
hereby issue this call for the fourteenth an- 
nual convention of the above named organi- 
zation, to be called to order in the port of 
New York, November 29, 1909, at 10 o'clock 
A. M., and to be continued from day to day 
until such time as the business of the con- 
vention .shall be finished. 

I wish to call your attention to Sections 
2, 3 and 4 of the Constitution, as follows: 

Sec. 2. Representation at the convention shall 
he hased upon the average per capita tax paid 
during the year. Organizations shall be entitled 
to one delegate for 200 members or more, three 
delegates for 500 or more, and one delegate for 
each additional 500 or majority fraction thereof. 

Sec. 3. That voting be done, giving to each 
delegate one vote for 100 members or majority 
fraction thereof. 

Sec. 4. Delegates shall have the same qualifi- 
cations as the elective officers of the organization 
represented and shall be elected by a general vote 
of each organization. Provided no one shall be 
seated as a delegate in the convention who is de- 
linquent in or who has been expelled by any affil- 
iated union; nor shall any one be qualified to act 
as a delegate who is also a member of an)"- labor 
organization not affiliated with the International 
Seamen's Union of .\merica. In case a vacancy 
in the regularly elected delegation occurs between 
the election of delegates and the convention, the 
various organizations shall have the power to till 
such vacancies. 

Also Section 8, as follows : 

Sec. 8. .Affiliated organizations shall at least 
send one delegate to the convention and shall de- 
fray the expenses of such delegates as they send, 
unless as specified in Section 5. 

It is to be hoped that your organization 
will select as many and the best possible 
representatives, as -this convention will be 
called upon to decide many knotty questions. 

Hotel accommodations and other arrange- 
ments will be looked after by the local com- 
mittee, and you will be notified later as to 
which hotel headquarters will 1)C located in. 
Fraternally, 

Wm. II. FRAZIIiR, 

Secretary-Treasurer I. S. U. A. 



LABOR AND LIQUOR. 



The Journal has frequently stated its posi- 
tion on the "liquor question." In view of the 
recurring efiforts to commit the labor move- 
ment to a policy of opposing all measures to 
regulate or restrict the sale of liquor, we deem 
it advisable to repeat our views. The Journal 
is not in favor of Prohibition nor of any other 
method of arbitrary suppression, but it recog- 
nizes that under certain circumstances such 
methods may be justifiable and even necessary. 
The Journal favors sobriety — absolute so- 
briety — and therefore believes that all measures 
designed to encourage that condition should be 
supported. In the matter of "personal liberty" 
the man who wishes to refrain from the drink- 
ing habit and its invariable concomitants is en- 
titled to consideration equally with the man 
who wishes to indulge that habit. We do not 
believe that the principle of "personal liberty" 
should be invoked solely for the benefit of 
those who favor the unrestricted sale of in- 
toxicants. So construed, the principle be- 
comes a matter, not of liberty, but of license. 
Obviously and in common justice, there are 
two sides to the question. 

Of course, we are mainly concerned in the 
attitude of the labor movement upon this ques- 
tion. In general that attitude is quite clear. 
A perusal of the records of the labor move- 
ment .shows that it has recognized the evils 
of the liquor habit and declared for abstinence 
and sobriety as a pre-requisite to industrial 
and social progress. Occasionally, and indeed 
altogether too frequently, local labor organiza- 
tions have aligned themselves with the liquor 
interests. It is true that this position has been 
taken not so much, if at all, in sympathy with 
the liquor habit as in sympathy with the classes 
of labor whose employment is jeopardized by 
restrictions upon the sale of liquor. This at- 
titude, while natural and even commendable in 
a sense, is none the less a distinct reversal of 
the set policy of the labor movement at large. 
That policy is based upon the principle of 
right or wrong, of good or bad, in the liquor 
habit. Upon that principle there is no room 
for discussion ; it has been settled by the uni- 
form experience and testimony of mankind in 
all ages and in all circumstances. To ignore 
this principle out of sympathy for those in- 
dividuals or classes whose personal interests 
are affected is to subvert principle to personal 
considerations. Principle can not be main- 
tained in that way. History informs us that 
the progress of Christianity was hindered by 
the opposition of the organizations employed 
in making idols and images of the gods. Of 
course, the spread of Chi^istianity threw the 
idol-makers out of employment. Nevertheless, 
Christianity continued to spread. 

History repeats itself in the case of those 
organizations which, because of their employ- 
ment in the manufacture and sale of intoxi- 
cants, set their faces against all reforms in the 
conduct of the liquor business. Those labor 
organizations whose syinpathies outweigh 
their principles ought at least to practice dis- 
cretion ; they ought to remain silent rather 
than speak out on the wrong side. Con- 
sidered merely as a matter of policy, it should 
be borne in mind that every step taken in 
opposition to the reasonable restriction of the 
liciuor traffic brings us nearer the time when 
more radical measures will be demanded. 
.\ny traffic which refuses to submit to such 
restrictions as may be deemed necessary by 
the community in which it is carried on must 
prepare itself for the ultimate ordeal of a life- 



and-death struggle. Is the labor movement 
prepared to throw its own fate into the balance 
with the traffic which it now defends? If not, 
it will do well to carefully mark the drift of 
the current upon which it has here and there 
embarked. 



SEAMEN'S PAY WITHHELD. 



The men employed on Government dredges 
at New Orleans have made frequent com- 
plaints against the injustice of withholding 
their pay, the practice of the Government in 
this respect being the same as that of private 
contractors. The matter has been taken up 
by Mr. George C. Bodine, Agent of the Atlan- 
tic Coast Seamen's Union and Sixth Vice- 
President of the International Seamen's Union 
of America, who has addressed the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor, as follows : 

Hon. Eugene Chamberlain, 

Department of Commerce and Labor, 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: — May I ask that some inquiry be made 
by your Department as to the manner and system 
of paying the sailors, firemen and employes of 
the various Government dredges working in the 
vicinity of this port and paying ofiF here through 
the United States Engineer's office? 

For the past year I have received nothing but 
complaints from the employes as to the holding 
up of their pay. The men make no contract with 
the Government to serve any stipulated period; 
they can be discharged at the master's pleasure, 
with or without cause, and can also quit at their 
own pleasure, with or without cause. Yet there 
seems to be an arbitrary rule here that if they 
exercise the same right that the master has and 
quit of their own volition, they must wait till the 
end of the month before the Government will pay 
them. 

The matter has even gone so far now that the 
men are unable to get their pay at the end of the 
month. 

I inclose you an order, payable at the Custom 
House here, dated September IS, the time the em- 
ploye left the dredge Delatour. The indorse- 
ment shows that he called for payment of same 
daily until October 5. On October 6 I called with 
him and was curtly told to come again the fol- 
lowing day and that the office did not know when 
the money would be ready. As the man was in 
absolute need I was forced to advance the amount 
due on it myself, namely, $20. 

Twenty men who left the employ of the dredge 
Renyard on the 6th of this month, most of whom 
had worked a month and six days on her, and 
the majority of whom had about $50 apiece due 
them, have not been able to get any of their 
money yet, although the Government contracts to 
pay off monthly. It is now over half a month 
since their September pay was due. 

Section 4529 of the Revised Statutes of the 
United States, as amended by the Act of De- 
cember 21, 1898 (30 Stat, at large), compels all 
masters of domestic vessels- to pay their seamen 
within forty-eight hours all wages due them. It 
is hard to see why the Government with its force 
of clerks is unable to do what it compels private 
shipowners to do. 

It will hardly be necessary for me to point out 
that this system as practised in this port is breed- 
ing the invariable number of crimps, loan sharks, 
etc., who take advantage of the necessity of the 
men. In other words this Department of the 
Government is fostering the very class of men 
that Congress has been so long legislating against. 

I am prepared to furnish innumerable names, 
amounts, dates and particulars, if you so desire. 

Please return inclosed order. 
Very truly yours, 

GEORGE C. BODINE. 
Sixth Vice-President, International Seamen's 
Union of America. 

New Orleans, La., October 16, 1909. 

The point made by Comrade Bodine, name- 
ly, that the men involved are seamen and 
ought to receive their pay in accordance with 
the provisions of the Navigation laws, is a 
good one. A recent decision of the United 
States Supreme Court, rendered on May 13, 
1907, determines the status of dredgemen be- 
yond all question. The case decided by the 
Court was brought to test the bearing of the 
National Eight-Hour law upon the men em- 
ployed on dredges. The Court decided that 
the law does not apply to such men for the 
reason, among others, that they are not "me- 
chanics or laborers," but seamen. Being sea- 
men, the men employed on dredges should re- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ceive the benefit of the law designed for the 
protection of that craft. As Comrade Bodine 
says in his letter to Commissioner Chamber- 
lain, it is inconsistent, as well as unfair, that 
the Government should evade the laws made 
and enforced in the case of private employers 
of seamen. To all intents and purposes, the 
men employed by the Government on its 
dredges are in the same position as men em- 
ployed on a vessel without signing articles ; 
they may be discharged or they may quit at 
the pleasure either of the master or of them- 
selves. In either event they are entitled to all 
the wages due them immediately upon the 
cessation of their employment. 



THE SWEDISH STRIKE. 



On page 1 of this issue we print a letter 
from Mr. Charles Lindley, describing the cir- 
cumstances of the great strike in Sweden. 
Brother Lindley's letter presents the first 
authoritative and comprehensive account of 
the Swedish struggle that has so far appeared 
in print. Whatever may be said for or against 
the policy of the general strike, there can be 
no doubt that the provocation was great in the 
case of the Swedish workers. The situation, 
as we conceive it from Brother Lindley's let- 
ter, is strongly reminiscent of that existing in 
San Francisco in 1901. The organized em- 
ployers had locked out a large number of men 
and threatened to lock out others unless their 
terms were agreed to, which terms included a 
practical renunciation of the right to organize. 
Confronted by such a situation, questions of 
theory and policy are liable to fall before the 
question of dire necessity. The Swedish 
workers determined upon a policy of mutual 
self-defense, which seemed to be the only al- 
ternative of division and defeat. Whatever 
the immediate outcome, there appears good 
warrant for the prediction of Brother Lindley 
that the organized employers have been 
taught a lesson which will stand them in good 
stead should they ever consider a repetition of 
the general lockout. The force and value of 
this lesson and the consequent advantage to 
labor — in a word, the whole result of the 
strike — depends upon the manner in which the 
Swedish labor movement shall be supported 
in the period that must elapse before the com- 
plete resumption of work.' With a continuance 
and increase of support from the labor move- 
ment in other parts of the world, the Swedish 
workers will be. enabled to bring the struggle 
to a close in a substantial victory for the prin- 
ciple at stake, namely, the right to organize 
and to maintain organization free from the 
threat of the general lockout. Both the gen- 
eral strike and the general lockout must be 
abolished, or they must continue to exist as in 
the nature of cause and efifect. Send along 
your contributions, and help the Swedish 
workers win a great and la.sting victory for 
all organized labor. 



The Australian Seamen's Union has decided 
to send a representative to the International 
Seamen's Conference, to be held in Europe 
during next year. This action indicates the 
growing scope of the Conference and affords 
a good assurance that that gathering will be 
fully up to the standard contemplated when it 
was first conceived. With a good representa- 
tion from the leading maritime countries of the 
world, there is no room to doubt that the de- 
liberations of the seamen will produce results 
of material and lasting benefit. 



The Japanese Navy has won another great 
victory ! A boat race between crews from the 
visiting warships held on San Francisco Bay 
during Portola week, was won by the repre- 
sentatives of the Mikado. It so happens that, 
owing to a protest by the Japs, the boats from 
all other ships were barred from the race, leav- 
ing only two contestants, the Japs and the 
Naval Militia. A boat from the United States 
cruiser St. Louis covered the course and 
crossed the finishing line a considerable dis- 
tance ahead of the Japs. To their surprise, 
the spectators learned that the St. Louis' boat 
was not in the race and that only the Japs and 
the Naval Militia were competing. The 
former won the trophy by a half-length. Thus, 
the "greatest naval heroes since Trafalgar" 
have the satisfaction of knowing that though 
they can't race with seamen they can at any 
rate beat landsmen ! Of such stuff are 
Japanese naval victories made. 



In another column of this issue we publish 
the Call for the fourteenth annual convention 
of the International Seamen's Union of Amer- 
ica. As stated by Secretary-Treasurer Frazier, 
the coming convention will be confronted by a 
number of matters of the highest importance 
to the present and future welfare of the sea- 
faring craft. The past year has been marked 
by a number of developments which the con- 
vention must take cognizance of and deal with 
in a manner calculated to safeguard the fu- 
ture. From present appearances the New 
York convention will be largely attended by 
delegates from every District and local union 
of the International. LTpon the principle that 
"there is safety in numbers," the outlook for 
the coming convention affords good assurance 
that the work in hand will be well done. 



When purchasing overalls, shirts or ready- 
made suits see that they bear the label of the 
L%ited Garment Workers. By so doing you 
will assist the workers in that industry to 
maintain decent conditions of employment. 



SWEDISH GENERAL STRIKE. 

(Continued from Page .1.) 



until they have gone out of the unions. Still this 
will be better than to be forced to accept an 
agreement that will bind our hands for years to 
come. 

Besides we have not finished the fight yet. We 
have taken out from those that are ordered back, 
all such groups that can and will fight, and by 
their fighting are able to do the capitalists the 
greatest amount of harm. Among those are the 
miners, especially in the iron mining trade. This 
is the best stock-jobbing company in Sweden. 
Originally 1000 krone, shares are now sold at 
about 4000 krone. The Swedish Government is 
also interested in this company. The iron ore 
exportation is among the chief sources of income. 
By keeping this at a standstill we will be able 
to hold a good screw on the employers. Besides 
this, the iron and steel mills are stopped, also the 
few coal mines that we have and a few factories 
in several trades where we can bring pressure to 
bear. 

The big difficulty is with regard to financial 
sujjport. Certainly we shall get good help from 
tliose who have managed to get back to work, 
and we shall for some time get further support 
from Germany, Denmark, Norway, and America, 
which lately has taken up a supporting attitude. 
But I dread most of all the fearful winter, when 
the open-air works will be closed down and when 
the sufferings of the victimized will be horrible. 

We would never have undertaken this general 
strike if there had been any other way open, but 
there being none we did all we could to fight, win 
or lose. 

I don't consider the battle lost as yet, because 
we have in reality won what we went out for, 
namely, to put a stop to the ernploycrs using 
threats of general lockouts in certain trades. This 
1 raffle is now broken, and the unions, when they 
grow stronger, will not be hampered with this 
;inv more. Fraternally yours, 

CHARLES TTNDLEY. 

Stockholm, September 30, 1909. 




M 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, October 25, 1909. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7:30 p. m,, P. Scharrenberg presiding. Secre- 
tary reported shipping medium. Balloting for 
delegates to the I. S. U. of A. convention was 
concluded. A. Furuseth was granted leave of 
absence to attend the convention of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor at Toronto, Canada. E. 
Ellison was elected Secretary pro tem., and John 
H. Tennison, Assistant Secretary pro tem. Otto 
Dittmar was elected to serve as Second Patrol- 
man during the sickness of R, Rollo. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St., Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 18, 1909. 
Situation fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 18, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; 
prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 18, 1909. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 

4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 18, 1909. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 18, 1909. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 62. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Oct. 18, 1909. 
Shipping good. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 16, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping quiet; pros- 
pects fair. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 18, 1909. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 11, 1909. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects very poor. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 21, 1909. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good for galleymen and waiters. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 14, 1909. 
Shipping slow. Made nominations for delegate 
to the New York Convention of the I. S. U. of A. 
LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 11, 1909. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. Plenty of men ashore. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 15, 1909. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Paul Gerhardt presiding. Secretary 
reported that all vessels had returned from the 
season's catch except from Loring. The full as- 
sessment of $3000 for the benefit of the Lake Dis- 
trict was ordered paid to the International Secre- 

I. N. HYLEN, Secretary. 
93 Stcuart St. Phone Kearny 3600. 



DIED. 

Scvrin Christiansen, No. 144, a native of Nor- 
way, aged 47, died at San Francisco, Cal, on Oct. 
20, 1909. 

Os'-ar Alexander Soderstrom, No. 1465, a native 
of iMuland, aged 26, died at San Francisco, Cat, 
on Oct. 24, 1909. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^^^* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contribuled by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



fC'vS^ 



WRECKS OF A WEEK. 



Two Cleveland f.teamers, the Uranus, of the 
Gilchrist fleet, and the Pontiac, of the Cleveland- 
Cliffs Iron Company, collided in the St. Clair 
River during a fog yesterday morning (September 
28). The Pontiac had a large hole punched in her, 
and it became necessary to run her on the beach 
in order to keep her from sinking. The Uranus 
was only slightly damaged, and shortly after- 
wards she proceeded on her way to Buffalo with 
her cargo of iron ore. 

The Uranus was at anchor in the river waiting 
for the fog to clear away when the Pontiac came 
along and also went to an anchor, according to 
a dispatch from Detroit. In some way the two 
ships went together, with the result as stated 
above. Luckily none of the crews were injured. 
Both vessels were bound down to Lake Erie with 
cargoes of ore. Captain R. A. Gaskin had com- 
mand of the Pontiac, and Captain Charles Gaug- 
hcll was in charge of the Uranus. 

The Pontiac was launched in 1889, and is 300 
feet long by 41 feet beam, while the Uranus was 
launched in 1901. and is 346 feet long by 48 beam. 

The Pontiac's stern is in about twenty-five feet 
of water. Captain James Reed, of the Reed 
Wrecking Company, and Captain H. M. Baker, 
of Detroit, are on the scene of the accident, and 
will put in bids for raising the ship. The dam- 
age to the Uranus was slight, excepting that she 
lost one of her anchors. 

Some years ago the Pontiac collided with the 
Canadian Pacific passenger steamer Athabasco 
in the Soo River, and the Pontiac was sunk and 
Captain Reed got the contract for raising her. 
That was considered one of the most difficult 
wrecking jobs ever done on fresh water. 

Two Firemen Scalded. 
Two firemen on the steamer Hoover and Mason 
were scalded when two tubes of her boiler blew 
out. The injured men were cared for when the 
steamer reached Sandusky yesterday morning 
fSeptemhcr 28). The Hoover and Mason was 
bound from Conneaut to Sandusky when the ac- 
cident happened and the steamer was delayed. 

Steamer Disabled. 

Port Huron, Sept. 30.— The steamer W. D. 
Rees bound down, picked up the disabled steamer 
D. R. Vanallan ofTf of Sanilac this morning, and 
towed her to this port. 

Repairs on the steamers Mars and Pontiac at 
the Lorain drydocks are being rushed along, the 
owners being eager to have the ships back in com- 
mission at the earliest possible moment. 

.■\ dispatch from Toledo says the tug A. W. 
Colton was ordered to the steamer A. S. Upson, 
aground at Bar Point. The Upson was bound 
down. 

The steamer E. H. Gary broke down on Lake 
Superior and was towed to Duluth by the steamer 
H. C. Frick. 

The steamer Lackawanna, which was sunk at 
Port Huron by the barge Chieftain, made tempo- 
rary repairs at Detroit yesterday. She will go to 
Buffalo, where she will be repaired after she is 
unloaded. The Lackawanna has a hole fifty feet 
long in her side. It will take two weeks to com- 
plete repairs on her. 

Cleveland Boats in Collision. 

Port Huron, Mich., Sept. 28. — The steamer 
Pontiac bound down loaded with ore was caught 
in the heavy fog just above St. Clair this morn- 
ing and in rounding to to anchor she collided 
with the steamer Uranus of the Gilchrist fleet, 
which was lying at anchor waiting for the fog 
to lift. The Pontiac swung across the Uranus' 
bow and a plate on the starboard side was broken. 
Capt. Gaskin at once started the Pontiac for the 
beach and succeeded in getting her bow in shallow 
water while her stern is in about twenty-five 
feet of water. 

Captain H. M. Baker of Detroit will put a patch 
on the break, which is abreast of number seven 
hatch, and it is expected the boat will be afloat 
to-morrow. The damage to the Uranus was 
slight excepting that she lost one of her anchors. 
The Uranus will proceed to Buflfalo where her 
ore cargo is consigned. 

Towing Company Asks Limit. 

Buffalo, .Sept. 28. — Justice Brown reserved de- 
cision in the special term to-day on the motion 
of the Hand & Johnson tug line for an injunc- 
tion halting all litigation growing out of the over- 
turning of an ore unloader at the dock of the 
Lackawanna Steel Co. recently. The tug firm is 
the defendant in at least three actions, two by 
administratrices of two men who lost their lives 
in the accident and one by the Lackawanna Steel 
Co. The total damages asked is $150,000. The 
tug firm wants to limit its liability to the value 
of the two tugs engaged in the work — about $10.- 
000. 

The tugs were removing an ore vessel from the 
dock when the ore unloader was struck and over- 
turned. 

Sault St. Marie, October 4. — What might have 
been a more serious accident was avoided to-day 
by the Lyman C. Smith in St. Mary's River. In 



a thick fog the Smith. Jones and J. G. Monroe 
were bunched in Mud Lake, near Point Aux 
Frene, all bound up. Suddenly a down bound 
boat loomed up out of the fog. Captain Ames, 
of the Smith, quickly swerved to port, avoiding 
a collision with the down bound vessel, whose 
name could not be learned. In so doing he struck 
the Monroe a glancing blow, breaking four plates 
on the latter's port bow and twisted his own 
stem to starboard. When she reached the Soo 
she tied up at the pier awaiting orders. The 
Monroe went on up the Lakes, and later the 
Smith proceeded to her destination. 

The steamer Yosemite recently hit the over- 
head wires at the Newburg & South Shore rail- 
road bridge and broke her topmast. 

The steamer L. C. Waldo was reported aground 
at Stag Island recently. She was released before 
the wrecker Favorite reached her. Captain Cun- 
ning found the steamer Frank C. Ball disabled at 
that point. 

Detroit, Mich., Oct. 3. — The steamer Colling- 
wood was pumped out and successfully raised 
here to-day. The tug Harding took her farther 
down the river and she is lying near the Ameri- 
can bank and will be taken to the Detroit I. & 
S. Co. dock to unload her coal cargo. 

The steamer Sellwood, bound down with ore, 
that ran aground in Lake St. Clair, was released 
early to-day after she had lightered on the lighter 
Rescue. 

The tug Colton and the lighter Rescue have 
gone to the steamer Socapa, aground between 
Belle Isle and Windmill point. She is bound 
up with coal. 

The steamer R. L. Ireland, in collision with the 
steamer Mary G. Elphicke some days ago. is at 
the yards of the Great Lakes Engineering Works 
with a badly twisted stem. She will be on the 
dock for at least ten days. The Ireland is owned 
by the Gilchrist Transportation Company, of 
this city. 

.'\s a result of the collision between the steamer 
Thomas Barium, of Detroit, and the steamer 
George H. Russell of the Gilchrist fleet in Buffalo 
harbor on May 12, the Gilchrist Transportation 
Co. has filed a libel of $22,278 against the Barium 
in the United States Court at Detroit. John J. 
Barium, manager of the Thomas Barium, said 
yesterday that the action is merely a step in the 
adjustment of the matter to the satisfaction of the 
undcrwriers. The Russell was at anchor when 
the Barium hit her, and according to Barium the 
accident was caused by the reducing valve get- 
ting out of order and disabling the steam steer- 
ing gear. His position is that the accident was 
unavoidable. 

The steamer Ball Bros., which was released 
from where she was aground near Amherstburg 
Friday night, proceeded to reload her cargo of 
ore yesterday. She had been aground forty-eight 
hours, and was finally pulled off by the tugs 
I'"avorite. Harding and Goulder. 

Detroit, Oct. 7. — Indications along the river 
front are that the thick fog of last night, which 
tied up navigation all the way from Lake Erie to 
Lake Huron, will be repeated to-night. The 
big steamer Ball Brothers is still across the head 
of Bois Blanc Island, and the wrecker Favorite, 
the tugs Harding and Goulder and the lighter 
Rescue are at work on her. Considerable ore 
has been .taken out of her. She is reported out 
about a foot. The current is strong at that point 
;ind it will be hard work releasing her. 

The steamer Plummer was aground near Bar 
Point, but was released by the tug Home Rule. 
The big carferry Great Western lost her way in 
the river and ran on Sandwich Point, but was 
released by the ferry Lansdowne and a tug. The 
little lumber steamer Emma Thompson was 
aground on a shoal below Belle Isle, but was 
released by a tug. The passenger boats from 
Cleveland, Buffalo and Put-in Bay were several 
hours late this morning, but got in safely. 

The 525-foot steamer Joseph Sellwood ran 
aground Saturday in Lake St. Clair between the 
lightship and the canal entrance. The Sellwood 
was bound down with a load of ore. 

She signaled for aid, and a tug and lighter 
went to her assistance. The Sellwood is sup- 
posed to be aground on exactly the same shoal 
as the barge Sagamore, which went on over a 
week ago while being towed down by the steamer 
Pathfinder. 

Port Huron, Mich.. Oct. 11. — The steamer 
Cherokee and consort Chippewa passed down at 
10 o'clock this morning in tow of the tugs Ottawa 
and Diver. The Cherokee lost her stern bearings 
while crossing Saginaw Bay. She will be towed 
to Cleveland for repairs. 

The steamer Maruba is at the Globe yards 
having her bulwarks, rail and upper stanchions 
repaired. 

The City of Berlin has had her repairs com- 
pleted in dry dock No. 3. She was recently dam- 
aged by fire. 

The Abyssinia is in No. 1 drydock getting her 
bottom calked and having repairs made on her 
towing machine. 

The William Edwards is in No. 2 drydock hav- 
ing some calking done and getting the 'ead of the 
buckets changed on her wheel. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Sept. 27. — The steamer James 



Laughlan lies at anchor in Mud Lake totally dis- 
abled by the breaking of both of her steering 
gears. Tugs will leave and tow her to the Soo 
in the morning for repairs. 



STRUGGLE ON THE LAKES. 



Frequent in(|iiiry has been made as to the 
standing of the strikers and the progress of 
the strike that was begun by the seamen of 
tlie Lakes last May. As the press is par- 
ticularly silent upon the subject, the Journal 
made inquiry in Chicago and received the 
following information from that city, which 
tells of everything appertaining to the situa- 
tion : 

There is keen vexation and gnashing of 
teeth among the members of the Lake Car- 
riers' Association — the shipowners of the 
Great Lakes' section of this country — for, 
lo ! the ten thousand strikers of the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union of America, who 
went out in May last, show no signs at this 
date of weakening, though it was confident- 
ly predicted by the bosses that the strike 
would be over before June L 

Tricks new and old have been tried to 
"bust" this powerful union, which is con- 
nected with all the maritime unions of the 
world, and also with the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. A few of these tricks were 
the instituting of the "Open Shop"' — "closed 
to union men;" the importation of strike- 
breakers from foreign countries, and the so- 
called "Welfare" plan, which the men style 
the "Ilellfare" plan, and which V. A. Oland- 
er, of Chicago, chairn>an of the district 
grievance committee of the International 
Seamen's Union, characterizes thus: 

"Its purposes are to make it dangerous 
for any seaman to voice a grievance, to ask 
for redress, or to resent ill-treatment, upon 
I)enalty of being exiled from the Lakes. 
The plan is the most rigid blacklist system 
I have ever known. While modeled upon 
the general line of the notorious Shipping 
Federation of England, it is infinitely more 
dangerous to shipping. 

"The Lake Carriers' so-called 'Welfare' 
l)lan, or espionage system, is contrived au- 
tomatically to press downward." 

But such practices have not availed ,the 
Lake Carriers one jot. Strikebreakers come 
hopeful, and go away disgusted; while those 
who remain are for the most part inexperi- 
enced. Result: Numerous accidents, clog- 
ging of freight, and steamships representing 
soine $30,000,000 of invested capital lying 
idle at the docks unable to secure crews. 

The strikers are confident of victory. 
They can not, they say, work under such 
conditions of "Open Shop," undermanning 
of ships, long hours and short pay, etc. 
And as a warning to all workmen who may 
be misled by agents of the Lake Carriers, 
or misinformed by reports of the capitalistic 
press, circulars are being sent broadcast tell- 
ing the true state of aflfairs. 

A report from the headquarters of the In- 
ternational Seamen's Union in Boston is to 
the effect that a vote at a recent meeting on 
the assessment for the benefit of the strikers 
of the Great Lakes district was practically 
carried unanimously. — Machinists' Monthly 
Journal. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



HEIGHT OF LAKES. 



The United States Lake Survey reports 
the stages of the Great Lakes for the month 
of September as follows : Lake Superior, 
602.39 feet above tidewater, New York; 
Lakes Michigan-Huron, 580.82 feet; Lake 
Erie, 572.38 feet ; I,ake Ontario, 246.28 feet. 

Since last month. Lake Superior has fal- 
len J^-inch, Lakes Michigan-Huron, 2^4 
inches ; Lake Erie 5 inches, and Lake On- 
tario, Syi inches. During October, Lake 
Superior is likely to fall J-^'inch; Lakes 
Michigan-Huron, 234 inches; Lake Erie, 3 
inches, and Lake Ontario 434 inches. 

Lake Superior is 9 inches lower than the 
average September stage of the past ten 
years, and about 4,V2 inches lower than last 
year. It is 6 inches higher than in Septem- 
ber, 189L but 133^ inches lower than in Sep- 
tember, 1899, and 11^ inches lower than in 
September, 1905. 

Lakes Michigan-Huron are 23^ inches 
lower than the average September stage of 
the past ten years and 5^^ inches lower than 
last year, but 13 inches higher than in Sep- 
tember, 1896. In September, 1885, the wa- 
ter was 29 inches higher. 

Lake Erie is exactly at the mean Septem- 
ber stage of the past ten years and 3^^ inch- 
es lower than in September of last year, but 
is 1334 inches higher than in September, 
1876, and 17 inches lower than in Septem- 
ber, 1885. 

Lake Ontario is 3 inches higher than the 
average September stage of the past ten 
years, but 1034 inches lower than in Sep- 
tember last year. In 1870 it was 12 inches 
higher, and in 1883 it was 13 inches higher 
than in 1909. In September, 1895, it was 
2734 inches lower than this year. 



ORDERS FOR NEW SHIPS. 



Orders for new ships are still coming in 
and contracts for two more boats to come 
out next season have been closed. The last 
order which was placed by the Rutland 
Transit Company is for two package freight 
steamers of full Welland Canal size. The 
boats will be built by the American Ship- 
building Company. The new boats will be 
duplicates of the steamer Ogdensburg of the 
Rutland line. They will be 256 feet over 
all, 244 feet keel, 43 feet beam and 26>^ feet 
deep. The steamers will have quadruple 
expansion engines and Scotch boilers. 

This contract makes eleveii steamers that 
the American Shipbuilding Company has 
under contract for 1910 delivery. The list 
includes seven big bulk freight steamers, 
two package freighters and two passenger 
steamers. The company's yards at Lake 
Erie ports will be kept pretty busy on new 
work during the coming winter. 

The Rutland Transit Company, which or- 
dered the new boats, operates a fleet of 
package freighters between Ogdensburg and 
Buffalo and Lake Michigan ports. The 
boats of the line stopped at Cleveland until 
this season, when a change was made. The 
company has four steel and four modern 
steamers. 



Robert Carbridge, formerly engineer on 
the steamer Mack, pleaded guilty before 
Judge Taylcr, in the United States Court at 
Cleveland on October 8 of raising his li- 
cense, and he was sentenced to one year and 
one day in Leavenworth prison. 



NEW DOCK AT CONNOR'S POINT. 



The contract for the piling and concrete 
foundation work at the big new Philadelphia 
&- Reading dock on Connor's Point has been 
let by the Hiland-Patterson Company to the 
Barnett & Record Company, the work to 
be finished in about a month. The Hiland- 
Patterson Company had the contract to 
build the dock complete and has at various 
times sublet portions of the work. 

The exact figures at which the contract 
was let to the Barnett & Record Company 
were not made public, but it is understood 
to be one of the biggest jobs of the kind that 
has been let at the head of the Lakes in 
some time. There are to be three runways, 
each 450 feet in length, with a concrete foun- 
dation on piling, the concrete being four 
ffct deep and nine feet wide at the bottom, 
with a top width of three feet. In addition 
there are to be eighty piers of concrete, nine 
by nine feet. The dock is to be completed 
next spring. 

The old Grand Northern dock, which has 
been leased by the Carnegie Dock and Fuel 
Company, will be rebuilt and work will be 
started at once. The dock will be extended 
1,000 feet to the harbor line. 

The present dock, which will be entirely 
rebuilt for the Carnegie company, is 1,000 
feet long and 320 feet wide. The addition 
to carry it to the dock line is 1,000 feet 
more, making a total length of 2,000 feet. 
This will give the Carnegie company, when 
completed, the largest dock in point of stor- 
age capacity at the head of the Lakes. For 
the present no hard coal sheds will be built, 
but these will be arranged for early next 
year. 



LAKE MARINE ITEMS. 



The New York & Great Lakes Transpor- 
tation Company has decided to give its fleet 
of canal boats Indian names. Five of the 
fleet will be christened Tuscarora, Onon- 
daga, Seneca, Cayuga, while the sixth boat, 
which'is a steamer, will be named the Tona- 
wanda. 



September was a record-breaking month 
in lumber receipts at the Tonawandas, 52,- 
189,722 feet having been received. During 
the present season up to October 1, the lum- 
ber receipts at the Tonawandas amounted 
to 208,853,570 feet, while the ore receipts to 
date are 285,329 tons. 



With the view to the establishment of a 
Life Saving station at Toledo, O., General 
Superintendent Kimball of the Life Saving 
Service has been ordered to proceed to Buf- 
falo for a conference with Lieutenant Com- 
mander Stearns, United States Navy In- 
spector of the Tenth Lighthouse district. 



The first of the new steamers building by 
the American Shipbuilding Company for the 
Pittsburg Steamship Company was launched 
on October 23 at Lorain and christened the 
William B. Schiller. Mr. Schiller is presi- 
dent of the National Tube Company, one of 
the subsidiary companies of the Steel Cor- 
poration, with offices in Pittsburg. The sec- 
ond of the new steamers building by the 
American Shipbuilding Company for this 
company will be ready for launching about 
the middle of November, and will be named 
the John P. Morgan, Jr. 



There is a strong feeling among the cap- 
tains sailing vessels to Duluth that the 
north pier of the ship canal should be light- 
ed. After the pier lights maintained by the 
city had been extinguished last season a 
couple of lamps were maintained at the end 
of the pier, under arrangements made by 
\\'illiam Livingstone, President of the Lake 
Carriers' Association, but this year no such 
arrangements were made and since Septem- 
ber 15 there has been nothing to guide the 
mariner on entering the harbor but the 
range lights maintained by the Government. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journ.-kl's ad columns ! 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Frank Donnelly is inquired for by his 
mother, Mrs. Eva Donnelly, 1317 Clark St., 
Racine, Wis. 



Wm. A. Nicholson, No. 13,156, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his sister. Miss 
Alice Nicholson, 356 Lake street. Oak Park 
111. 



Millard McLeod, No. 22582, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his mother, 
Mrs. D. A. McLeod, Box 475, Sterling, Kan- 
sas. 

Fred Smith, No. 9872, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is wanted by his mother, at Buffalo, 
N. Y. Any one knowing his address please 
communicate with W. L. Smith, 55 Main 
St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Albert Appenyella, sometimes known as 
Albert Zellers, supposed to be a seaman and 
a dredgeman, is inquired for by his sister, 
Anna Goodmiller, 806 E. Wood St., Deca- 
tur, III. 



LAKE SEAMEN* S DIRECTORY. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, lil. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Teleplione 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Plioiie Boll ISItO. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 213 Banks Avenue 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Midi 108 Fifth Avenue 

OOnENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont.. Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ICRIE, Pa 305 French Street 

Telephone Bell 682. 

CONNBAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 113 92nd Street 

Teleplione 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 

HOSPiTALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELraP STATIONS. 

A.<!hland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Duluth,' Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

lOsrnnalni, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven. Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

CJreen Bay, Mich. Sliel)oyKan. Mich. 

Houp-'.Lon, Mich. SturKeon Bay. Wis. 

Ludinglon. Midi. Superior. Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



NEEDLE-WORKERS OF THE LOIRE. 



The recent inquiry by the French Bureau 
of Labor is set forth in a report deaHng 
with some of the "home" industries, espe- 
cially those in the branch of needlework. In 
the Loire region, at Bourges, Mans and Cho- 
let, women labor ten hours or more per day 
sewing on shirts, skirts and other articles 
of clothing. For this work they derive an 
annual income of from 108 to 240 francs 
($20.84 to $46.32). In numerous districts a 
wage of from 3 to 5 centimes (5 centimes= 
1 cent) per hour is paid. Competition, both 
in respect to labor and markets, is said to 
have produced this condition. The beauti- 
ful work of other days, known as classique, 
is no longer in demand. The poor stuff 
flooding the markets, principally in the 
country districts, has given rise to the keen- 
est competition among legions of working 
women, who engage in every kind of ordi- 
nary hand w'ork. In Bretagne, at Concar- 
neau, the sardine packers, when the season 
is slack, are employed in the production of 
"Irish lace" at ridiculously low wages. They 
produce their goods from patterns furnished 
to them by the large buyers. In Auvergne 
the field laborers make pillow lace, which 
nets them at the rate of 25 centimes (5 cents) 
per meter (39.37 inches). These same goods 
are said to be sold elsewhere for 1.50 francs 
(39 cents) per meter. The attempt made 
by certain fashionable ladies to place the 
laces "on vogue" has, according to report, 
met with little success. 

At a recent conference at the Academy 
of Moral and Political Sciences the question 
of a change of system with regard to such 
labor and its compensation was discussed 
by men prominent in the lace industry and 
trade. These men discourage any attempt 
to provide relief through legislative means, 
but suggest that an arrangement be effected 
with the workers which will insure them a 
more equitable basis in the production of 
their hand work. This includes the consid- 
eration of a minimum annual wage for a 
day of ten hours, as well as the condition 
that, in the distribution of work, the price 
of "making up" should accord with the min- 
imum rate. There seems to be a disinclina- 
tion to follow in the steps of recent British 
legislation in these special classes of indus- 
try. The feeling appears to sanction the 
scheme of a voluntary understanding or 
contractual relation between the cottage 
workers and the agents. — Consular Report. 



ANCIENT ART REDISCOVERED. 



Through mistaking another compound for 
borax, while working at his trade as a jew- 
eler, David Lamon of Denver has suddenly 
found himself in possession of the much- 
sought-after method of hardening copper. 
This powder, instead of softening the metal, 
as borax does, instantly changed the heated 
copper into such a degree of firmness that 
manipulation was impossible. Quick to take 
the advantage that fortune had so unex- 
pectedly thrust upon him, the jeweler at 
once made a critical analysis of the com- 
pound, determined the ingredient and 
finally protected his wonderful secret by a 
patent. 

The art that was old when the pyra- 
mids where building, and which crumbled 
into dust with its discoveries, to remain a 
mystery and a hopeless secret for centuries, 



has again been given the world by the for- 
tunate blunder of an unsuspecting jeweler. 

Heretofore the combined efforts of earn- 
est scientists to treat and harden this metal 
have either been in merely glazing the sur- 
face, or by addition of certain substances 
while in a molten state. Neither of these 
processes has really accomplished all that 
could be desired, nor has the treatment been 
put into practical use. 

Contrary to these methods, the Lamon 
process not only hardens the copper, but 
tempers it as well. It is neither treated in 
the molten state, nor glazed, but the finished 
product, in any and all shapes, is given a 
complete and lasting physical change. The 
tensile strength is increased and the life of 
the metal lengthened more than treble. — 
Technical World Magazine. 



WOMEN AND THE OCCUPATIONS. 



There has been a considerable amount of 
discussion of late in the press and in the 
magazines in regard to the number of wom- 
en who are entering the trades and profes- 
sions. Professor Thomas — who is connect- 
ed with the University of Chicago — has been 
writing articles for the American Magazine 
and in the September issue of this periodical 
he devotes himself to a consideration of this 
subject. Part is as follows: 

"It is idle, indeed, to speak of the ex- 
clusion of women from the occupations. 
They are entering them from the top and 
from the bottom. The ill-conditioned are 
being forced into them and the well-condi- 
tioned — those whom men have been educat- 
ing while deploring the use of their educa- 
tion — are already entering them in considcr- 
al)le numbers at the top. And they are 
finding new and characteristic ways of giv- 
ing to society that reserve of affection and 
nurture which they have heretofore re- 
served for the child and the home. 

"In the year 1900 there were more than 
3,000,000 women gainfully employed in the 
United States (as against 23,753,836 men), 
the rate of increase between 1890 and 1900 
of the number of women so employed was. 
much greater than the corresponding in- 
crease for the employment of men (for wom- 
en 32.8 per cent; for men 21.9 per cent), and 
the number of women gainfully employed 
increased more rapidly in the decade than 
the female population. So, whether we wish 
it or not, the old order is already changing 
rapidly. It is too late to theorize on this 
point. It means simply that the old idea 
that all women should live on the activities 
of men and should limit their own interests 
to the bearing and rearing of children has 
gone to pieces." 



LA50R'S ECONOMIC PLATfORM. 



The tie-treating plant of the Mexican Cen- 
tral Railroad has reached an output of 3500 
ties per day, making it one of the largest con- 
cerns of its kind in the world. The local 
plant is the first in the history of railway 
operation to make a success of the treatment 
of ties by the Ebano oil process. It is ex- 
pected that the treatment will prolong the 
life of each tie from 8 to 12 years. 



The production of all kinds of cement in 
the. United States last year totaled 52,775,- 
925 barrels, worth $44,376,656, a decrease in 
value from 1907 of over $11,500,000. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the .American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OP AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 122 Alexander St., P. O. Box 
1365. 

TACOMA, W'ash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SE.A.TTLE, Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, W^ash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 62. 

I'ORTI.AND. Or., 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

.SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box C7. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 14081^. Western Ave., P. O. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. n Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal.. 200 M SL 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



PRECOCITY AND GENIUS. 



. There was Jenny Lind, for instance, who, 
at 5 or 6 years of age, astounded everybody 
with the purity of her voice and her won- 
derful skill in its management. The piano- 
forte playing of Meyerbeer, Mozart and 
Mendelssohn, when they were 6 years of 
age, aroused the admiration of every critic, 
while when he was 8 Paganini composed a 
sonata of so difficult a nature that none but 
himself could execute it. He performed it 
in public at the age of 9. 

At the age of 3 Paderewski could play the 
piano, while Lady Halle, when she made 
her first public apeparance at 6 years of 
age, created such enthusiasm that a tour 
was instantly arranged, which included 
such musical centers as Leipzig, Berlin and 
P>reslau. At 8 Lady Halle was playing at 
the London philharmonic concerts. 

Among present-day actresses are many 
who showed histrionic talent at tender 
years. INTiss Ellen Terry made her debut 
when she was 8. Mrs. Kendal was appear- 
ing at the Marylebone Theater when she 
was 4, and playing Ophelia at the Hay- 
market when she was 16. Miss Bateman, 
the famous impersonator of Leah, first ap- 
peared on the stage when she was 5, and 
when she was 8 was brought to London by 
the late P. T. Barnum to appear in a series 
of Shakespearean revivals. Lady Bancroft 
was at one time the leading child acress in 
the country, while Miss Ada Reeves ap- 
peared before the public when she was 6, 
and at 14 was an acknowledged music hall 
"star."' Miss Vesta Tilley began still earlier. 
Her stage career started when she was 3, 
and at 6 she first appeared in men's clothes 
and was advertised as the "Pocket Sims 
Reeves." 

Two or three years ago quite a number 
of child-preachers were attracting attention 
on both sides of the Atlantic, notably Fran- 
ces Storr, the 12-year-old Doncaster girl, 
who often had audiences numbering close 
upon 2000; Lonnie Dennis, who was only 5 
when he preached to an audience of over 
3000 in New York, and included among his 
sermons one which told how he was called 
to the ministry at 4 years of age ; and Jack 
Cooke, the Manchester boy, who at a very 
early age determined to become a second 
D. L. Moody. He preached his first sermon 
when he was 11, and two years later con- 
ducted many successful missions in the 
States. 

Who knows but what they may follow in 
the footsteps of Spurgeon, who was an ac- 
tive member of the Baptist connection while 
he was still in knickerbockers, and preached 
his first sermon at the age of 16? Before 
he was 20 Exeter Hall was not large enough 
to hold his congregation. George Fox, the 
evangelist and founder of the Society of 
Friends, was quite a little boy when he 
started preaching at a tavern, and George 
Whitefield and John Wesley both com- 
menced preaching at a very early age. 

It has often been said that the most amaz- 
ing example of precocious genius on record 
is furnished by John Stuart Mill, who at 
3 years of age was learning the Greek al- 
phabet, and at 8 had read in the original 
many Greek authors. Then he began to 
learn Euclid, algebra and Latin, and be- 
fore he was 12 was made to teach the young- 
er members of the family. 



The precocity of Sir William Rowan 
Hamilton, the celebrated mathematician, is 
often overlooked. He excelled in the study 
of languages, and is said to have known at 
least thirteen at the age of 12. At 3 years 
of age he was a very good reader of English 
and considerably advanced in arithmetic. 
At 4 he was a good geographer, and at 5 
able to read and translate Latin, Greek and 
Hebrew. Then he added a knowledge of 
Italian and French to his learning before 
going on with Arabic and Sanskrit. — Lon- 
don Tit-Bits. 



INDUSTRIAL GERMANY. 



The German industrial census of 1907 
takes in all concerns that employ labor. As 
soon as a man employs in his business one 
person outside the members of his own fam- 
ily his business becomes an industrial con- 
cern and subject to government regulation. 
The railroad, postal, telegraph and telephone 
employes are especially excluded, but city 
tramway employes, employes in the railroad 
shops, farm laborers, foresters, clerks, sales- 
men, and even the employes of the army 
canteens are included. These figures indi- 
cate a constant tendency in manufacturing 
toward the development of larger concerns. 
In other classifications both the number of 
concerns and the number of their employes 
are increasing in about normal ratio. Re- 
garding the figures as a whole, during the 
past twelve years (1895-1907) the number 
of employes has increased in a ratio about 
four times that of the concerns employing 
them, and the proportionate increase of fe- 
male employes is still greater. 

The census of 1907 shows that there were 
then employed in 4,025,591 industrial concerns 
in Germany a total of 14,348,389 persons, of 
whom 3,510,466 were women. Of these con- 
cerns 3,423,645 were independent or main con- 
cerns and 601,946 were branch shops or fac- 
tories. In 1895, the date of the last previous 
census, the total number of employes was 10,- 
269,269, an increase of 4,079,120 for 1907. 
The number of concerns in 1895 and 1907, re- 
spectively, as given in the census was as fol- 
lows : Gardening, stock raising, fishing, etc., 
53,547 and 63,706; manufacturing, mining and 
building, 2,428,473 and 2,326,200; trade and 
transportation, including hotels and restau- 
rants, 1,176,068 and 1,635,685. In the fore- 
going concerns the number of employes in 
1907 in excess of 1895 was as follows: Gar- 
dening, etc., 50,983 ; manufacturing, mining 
and building, 2,852,407 ; trade and transporta- 
tion, including hotels and restaurants, 1,175,- 
730. 

The classification of trade and transportation 
includes not only stores, tramways, forwarding 
agencies, etc., but also practically all places 
where liquors are sold. 

In addition to the foregoing classifications, 
statistics of a class of concerns under the head- 
ing of theatrical, musical, carnival showmen, 
and fair merchants were collected in 1907 for 
the first time. Of such concerns 34,338 were 
found, giving employment to 87,906 persons, 
of whom 19,067, or nearly 22 per cent, were 
females. 



Work on the first fourteen-inch gun ever 
built for the Navy has been begun at the 
Government factory at Washington, D. C. 



FISHERMEN'S RELIEF FUND. 



M 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



San Francisco, Cal., October 15, 1909. 
To the Officers and Members of the Alaska Fish- 
ermen's Union — 

Comrades: We, your regularly elected Finance 
Committee, as per instruction of meeting October 
1, 1909, beg to report, after a careful examination 
of the various subscription lists for Hans Goran- 
son, No. 11, Michael Nilsen, No. 280, and John 
Anderson, No. 552, also on separate subscription 
lists for Mrs. H. Goranson, Mrs. Willman and 
Jack Malony, as follows: 

On the Goranson, Anderson and Nilsen lists, as 
follows: 
By the North Alaska Salmon Co. men, 

Hallerville $ 49.OO 

By the North Alaska Salmon Co. men, 

Lackonak 51.00 

By the North Alaska Salmon Co. men, 

Egegak 19.0O 

By the North Alaska Salmon Co. men, 

Nushagak 00.00 

By the L, A. Pedersen's men at Naknek. 148.00 
By the Nelson Lagon Salting Station men 30.00 
By the Olson and Nelson men, Koggiung 24.50 
By the Peter M. Nelson's men, Egushik.. 50.00 
By the F. B. Peterson's men, Naknek.... 56.00 
By the F. B. Peterson's men, Ugashik.. .. 48.00 
By the Northwestern Fisheries Co. men, 

Orca 7.00 

By Ch. Buschmann of the N. W. F. Co , 

Seattle 5.00 

By the A. F. P. Co. men, Astoria, Ore. 

(Nushagak) Sl.QO 

Ry the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

Karluk 57.50 

By the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

Koggiung 58.50 

By the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

Egegak 76.00 

By the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

(Nushagak), Clarks' Can 144.00 

By the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

(Nushagak), Scandi Can 53.50 

By the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

Naknek 184.50 

Ry the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

I-oring 35.50 

By the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

Chignik 64.50 

By the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

Alitak 36.00 

By the Alaska Packers' Association men. 

Cook Tnlet 2.00 

Ry the Alaska Packers' Association men, 

Fort Wrangel 64.00 



Grand Total $1314.50 



Total paid out by Treas. Ed. Andersen.. $ 451.60 
Leaving a balance to be divided of 862.90 



Grand Total $1314.50 

We, your Committee, recommend that this 
money be equally divided between the three par- 
ties, these funds having been subscribed for that 
purpose. This will give to each two hundred and 
eighty-seven 63/100 dollars ($287.63). 



We, your Committee, further find that addi- 
tional subscriptions have been taken up by our 
Seattle Agent, Fred. Swanson, for Comrade Hans 
Goranson, as follows: 
From the crew of the J. D. Peters for the 

N. W. F. Co., Seattle $ 98.50 

From the crew of the B. F. Packard for 

the N. W. F. Co., Seattle 92.50 

From the crew of the ship St. Paul for 

the N. W. F. Co., Seattle 163.00 

From the crew of the bark Guy C. Goss 

for the N. W. F. Co., Seattle 131.00 

By the Northwestern Fisheries Company 

of Seattle 50.00 



Grand Total $535.00 

These funds we find have been properly turned 
over to Mrs. Goranson, widow of Hans Goranson. 
To Mrs. Hanna Willman, widow of Comrade 
Karl E. Willman, who drowned on the Koggiung 
River, Alaska, July 4, 1909, we find the following 
separate subscription taken up and properly 
turned over to Mrs. Willman: 
Ry the men from the L. A. Pedersen Can- 
nery, Naknek $ 77.00 

By the men from the A. P. A. Cannery, 

Naknek 87.50 

By the men from the A. P. A. Cannery, 

Koggiung 292.50 

By the crew of the James Nesmith while 
paid off per J. Johnson 47.00 



Grand Total 



.$504.00 



We further find fifty-six no/100 dollars ($56.00) 
subscribed to sick Italians by the crew of the 
ship Indiana while paid off, and which funds have 
been properly turned over to Jack Malony, who 
was in charge of these subscriptions. 
Rcspectfullj' submitted. 

I. N. HYLEN, Secretary, 
Alaska Fishermen's Union. 

PAUL GERHARDT, 
HFNRY R. HOEPPNFR, 
THOMAS SWANSON, 

Finance Committee. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The Chinese Government has an- 
nounced that the four treaty ports in 
Chientao will be opened on Novem- 
ber 2. 

The second international pure-food 
congress was opened at Paris on 
October 18 by M. Ruau, Minister of 
Agriculture. 

The University of Copenhagen has 
declined to forego its privilege to the 
first examination of the North Pole 
records of Dr. Cook. 

The Chilean Government has de- 
cided upon $20,000,000 naval expendi- 
tures. The program includes the 
building of a Dreadnought. 

Prophecies of a second war between 
Japan and Russia are made in the 
Hochi Sliimbun, a Tokio paper, under 
the heading "Superficial Peace." 

Twenty-five persons were drowned 
on October 21 following the bursting 
of a dam at Lake Dorkos, thirty miles 
northwest of Constantinople. The lake 
supplies water for the capital. 

Japanese newspapers complain that 
despite official action by the Chinese 
Government, the boycott against Japa- 
nese steamers and merchants is grow- 
ing, especially in North China. 

A report was current in St. Peters- 
burg on October 20 that orders had 
been issued for the mobilization of 
the First Corps of the Russian Guard 
preliminary to the occupation of Fin- 
land. 

The recent earthquake in Beluchis- 
tan, East India, was the worst that has 
occurred over such a wide area in 
many years. It is reported that the 
fatalities were 136 and that 150 per- 
sons were injured. 

Copies of circulars issued in North 
China have been received in Japan 
after having been spread broadcast 
among Chinese of the lower classes 
disseminating inflammatory state- 
ments against the Japanese. 

Professor Caesar Lombroso, the 
noted Italian criminologist and alien- 
ist, died at Turin on October 19. He 
was born at Venice in November, 1836. 
Professor Lombroso was widely 
known for his stuoies in criminology. 

Nicaragua is fully carrying out with 
the United States her agreement for 
the settlement of the claim of the 
George D. Emery Company in annul- 
ment of the latter's timber concession 
in Nicaragua, and has made the first 
payment on the $600,000. 

The Spanish Cabinet formed Janu- 
ary 25, 1907, under the Premiership of 
Antonio Maura resigned on October 
21 as a result of the bitter attacks 
made against the Government by the 
former Premier, Moret y Prendergast, 
representing a powerful opposition. 

King Frederick of Denmark has ac- 
cepted the resignation of M. Christen- 
sen, Minister of War and Marine. 
Christensen has been the subject of 
severe criticism at public demonstra- 
tions because of his alleged respon- 
sibility in connection with the Alberti 
frauds. 

American capital is being invested 
heavily abroad in the construction of 
railroads. There has just been granted 
to an American syndicate the right to 
construct 1243 miles of railroad line 
in Turkey, extending from Ivas to 
Mosul and beyond, and touching the 
towns of Harput, Diarbekir, Bitlis and 
Van. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
:ind best equipped private Nautical School in 
tlie United St.ites. Graduates prepared for the 
.\merican and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant officers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
lug the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal Instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M. A.. Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor. Passed Master. Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters, including Naturalization. 



ROOS BROS. 

Biggest Values in Men's Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Hats 

50 YEARS IN BUSINESS 

ROOS BROS. 



MARKET STREET 



San Francisco 



MARSHFIELD, OR. ' 

UNION CIGAR STORE 

383 FRONT ST. 

MARSHFIF.LU, OREGON 

Dealers in 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO, CANDY, 
NUTS, ETC. : 

Longshoremen and Sailors' Headquarters 
HERMAN CORDES, Prop. 
Phone 97-L 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
seaman Ernst Dau, please notify the 
German Consul at San Francisco. 

James Thoburn was at the Sea- 
men's Institute about 1902. Letter 
awaiting him at 242 Steuart street, 
San Francisco. 

.'\rthur John Martin. Was in San 
Francisco last March. Any news of 
him sent to Seamen's Institute will be 
appreciated. 

Robert Fordyee Bowers, over 5 
feet in height, rather stout, was in 
American Navy during 1906. Letter 
awaiting him at Seamen's Institute, 
242 Steuart street, San Francisco. 

Robert Fordyee Bowers, age 33 
years, height over 5 feet, stout build; 
correspondence awaiting him at Sea- 
men's Institute, 242 Steuart street, San 
Francisco. 

John M. Murphy, dark hair, blue 
eyes, height 5 feet 8, smooth face. 
Last heard of at Oakland. Any in- 
formation, communicate Seamen's In- 
stitute, 242 Steuart street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Harry W. Morse, of Watertown, 
Mass., about 5 ft. 8, light hair, blue 
eyes, wore glasses. Enquiry from 
Lillian J. Morse. Letter awaiting him 
at Seamen's Institute, Steuart street, 
San Francisco. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Any one 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Portland, 
Ore. 

Henry Laurent, who has been sail- 
ing between San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 

John Johnson, a native of Norway, 
born September 15, 1858, at Blege- 
leidet Bamle; last heard from in 1904 
living at 230 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, 165 Third 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," th« "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 



C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second Street, 



Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY S. YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups. Sarsapariila and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

4.38 SECOND STREET. COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



SC ANDI A HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 
Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSE.N', Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The five sailors who left the schoon- 
er A. J. West at Honolulu, on March 
30, 1908, are requested to communicate 
with the Secretary of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific. The libel against 
the A. J. West has been adversely de- 
cided by the Federal Court at Hono- 
lulu. 



HE LIVES UP TO HIS NAME 

WHO 

Why Boss the Boss Tailor 




HE EMPLOYS ONLY FIRST- 
CLASS UNION HELP 
NUF CED. 

Boss the Tailor 

1120 MARKET ST. 



Opposite Seventh 



San Francisco 



Seattle, Wanh., Letter List. 

. Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
PostofBce. letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union .Xgency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 

Andersen, A. B. Krentz. Karl 

Akes.son, C. A. Kristofferson, Alfred 

Andersen. Lars Kristiansen, Louis 

Andersen. Carl P. Kristiansen, Nils 

Aposliolokos, P. G. Kristofferson, Emil 

Apps, P. Kuhl, Hans 

.\tkinsen, S. Larsen, Chr. 

Back, M. Larsen. Hans 

Rerentsen, Rolf. Latz, K. 

Berentson, Alex. Laurltsen. Hans 

Blomquist, B. W. Lind, H. E. 

Bohman, Eric Lof, 0.scar 

Boad. Malmberg, A. C. 

Brown, Jim Mavers, P. M. 

Brakke. Hans Masterson. D. 

I5uck, F. Mattson. E. -1856 

Buth, Sigfrled Mathison. Nils 

Carmen, Geo. B. McDonald. .Tames 

Carlson, Thure McFadden. W. 

Christiansen, An- McGulre, O. S. 

drew Mitchell, S. 

Chapman, P. G. Mietm.an. John 
ChristolTersen, Emil Mikkelson, Kr. 

Christie, W. Morrison. J. 

Chotard, Emil Molver. Olot 

Conee, A. Monsson, S. 

Draw, J. Mortimer, Ernest 

Eichel, Chas. Ness, Carl 

Klliot, W. V. Nelson, Peter 

RIsted, John Nirholsen. O. T. 

lOliasen, C. Optlger. Geo. 

lOllioidt, Alfred Olsen, E. K. 

I'^lwood, Alfred Olason, Axel 

i:ngstrom. Chas. Olsen, B. -597 

Ernst, Geo. Olsen, Hans P. 

Rrickssen, A. R. Olsen, Anton 

Fasig, Don Olsen, Ragwold 

Frodriksen, B. D. Overland, T. -912 

Glasheen, Jolm Peder.ssen, Olaf 

Gonyette. Joseph Pedersen, Chr. 

Grohn, John Pel, J. Van 

Grise, J. H. Penny, W. 

Gustafson. K. O. Petterson, Meyer 

Hansen. K. Johan Peterson. Peter 

Hansen, Harold O. Petersen, E. P. -668 

Hansen. T. S. Penningrud, L. 

Harris, E. Price. Bruce 

Hansen, John Rasmussen, And. 

Hansen. Ernest Rasmussen, Harold 

Hellnvood, Rasmussen. Ackton 

Hodlund, Arvid Ruman, Karl 

llermansen. L. Rlehbrack, Paul 
Herbert, Chas. • Rides, Arthur 

Holden, W. Robertson. D. A. 

Ingalls. Lewis Rugland, Ole 

Jacklin, C. Sandstrom, Th. 

Jacobson, T. Saaleness, T. J. 

Jacobson. Carl Sandstrom. O. S. 

.lersch, W. Scherlan, R. 

J. W. Seidel, G. 
Johanson, C. J. -1566skarin, R. 

Johanson, K. -1592 Sorensen. Hans 

Johanson, Chas. Sally, Ed. 

Johanson, Hans Steen, Ivar -1999 

.Johnson, -Mf. -1700 Sundley. E. 

Jolinson. Eric Swanson, Emil 
Jorgensen, Julius A. Swanson, B. 

Kalning. Jacob Thomas, W. 

Kahlhetser, F. Thonesen, Tonger 

Kaald, Jolian Thompson, T. G. 

Kisher, K. Zcbr. G. 

Klingenberg. J. "^Vinnle, Clifton 

Knutson, E. A. Worm. Albert 

Koliler, Albert Woolridge. C. C. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes. Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing. Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burntide 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
. or we both lose money. 
OflHce: 
23 UNION AVENUE - • Portland. Or*. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, 


WASH. 


BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 




1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



HUOTARI &i CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

"announcement 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPP^NDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothlng^, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closf>B at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road " and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 

around the corner from the Union Offlce. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Wliere tlie Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 

Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chaa. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

11 Coleman Dock, SEATTLE, Wash. 

Offlce Phone, Ind. 1713. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 



r^ 




MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Clothjng, Boots and Shoes, 

Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnlsh- 

. ings and Sailors' Outfits. 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Henry 'D. Steele, No. 2166, of the 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Alfred Douglas Brakel, a native of 
Russia, also known as Fred Hansen, 
left the Russian cruiser Lena; last 
heard of about three years ago, is in- 
quired for by his mpther. Address, 
"Coast Seamen's Journal." 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, please mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed in the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

494 ARCADE BUILDING 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



NILS HOKANSON 
High Class Tailor 

A place to go when other.s fail to satisfy. 

First-Class Workmanship, Perfect Fit 

Guaranteed 

STRICTLY UNION HOUSE. 

106 SPRING STREET 
Bet. 1st and 2d aves., Seattle, Wash. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



W. J. McARDLE 
Men's Furnishings, Rubber Boots, Oil- 
skins and Shoes. 
Union-made Goods a Specialty. 
70 Yesler Way, corner R. R. Avenue 
Seattle, Washington. 



The loss from fire which swept 
Quebec's water front on Oc'-ober 17 
will exceed $1,000,000. 

The British schooner Emily R., 
from St. John for Maitland, with a 
general cargo, foundered ofif Cape St. 
Mary on October 12. 

The schooner Albert Phara has been 
beached at Bangor, Me. She has 
been purchased by George A. Gilchrist 
and will be broken up. 

A special cable from London states 
that while no official statement is ob- 
tainable there, yet well-informed cir- 
cles attach much importance to the 
rumored Canadian Pacific control of 
the Allan Steamship line. 

The new German steamship Etha 
Rickmers, which was constructed at 
Bremerhaven, and which arrived at 
Norfolk, Va., recently, has been or- 
dered to proceed to Philadelphia to 
load a full cargo of case oil for Japan. 
Record target practice scores of the 
Ainerican Navy for 1909, show that 
the Washington is a winner in the 
battleship class, the Charleston in the 
cruiser class, the Wilmington in the 
gunboat class, and the Tingey in ves- 
sels competing for the torpedo trophy. 
Attaining a speed of 31.85 knots an 
hour, the torpedo boat destroyer Reid 
had a four-hour run at Bath, Me., on 
October 9, completing her tests for 
speed and coal and water consumption 
and clinching her claim to the title of 
fastest of American naval vessels. 

A $10,000 silver service and a stand 
of colors were presented to the battle- 
ship Minnesota at New York on 
October 4. The silver was the gift of 
the State whose name the warship 
bears, and the flags came from Min- 
nesota school children, each child hav- 
ing given one cent for the purpose. 

Captain Rawding, of the schooner 
Ellen Little, which arrived at Bos- 
ton from Tampa, recently, reports 
passing a vessel's spar projecting 
about IS feet out of water and stand- 
ing upright, on October 3, in latitude 
34.10 north and longitude 76 west. The 
spar i.s apparently attached to a sub- 
merged wreck. 

First Officer J. S. Townsend, of the 
United States collier Hannibal, has re- 
ceived a personal letter from the Sec- 
retary of the Treasury commending 
"the promptness, coolness and disre- 
gard of personal danger" which char- 
acterized his action in saving seven 
lives during the coaling of the United 
States steamship Mississippi in Hamp- 
ton Roads, on September 13. 

The Merchants and Miners' line 
steamship Persian has been placed on 
the Southern route from Philadelphia, 
while the steamship Lexington, of the 
same line, will operate between Phila- 
delphia and Boston. The former will 
take the place temporarily of the 
steamship Frederick, which is to 
undergo repairs at Newport News. 
The Frederick was towed into Savan- 
nah recently after having met with a 
series of mishaps during the recent 
hurricane. 

The freight steamer George Stone 
of Cleveland was wrecked on Point 
Pelee, Ont., on October 13 and six 
lives were lost. Captain Paul Howell, 
Peter Daley of Erie, Pa., and six 
members of the crew were overturned 
in tile surf attempting to go ashore 
for assistance. Two of the crew clung 
to the overturned boat four hours 
until they drifted ashore. The re- 
maining ten members of the ci-'ew 
were taken ofT the wreck by the 
steamer F. M. Osborne. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Eleven Chinese, arrested at Dallas, 
Texas, recently in a freight car, were 
sentenced to deportation. 

The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania 
on October 19 allowed an appeal in 
the cases growing out of alleged 
grafting in connection with the build- 
ing of the State Capitol. 

Six of the fifteen county officers 
and salesmen indicted by the special 
grand jury for offering and accepting 
a bribe at Youngstown, O., pleaded 
guilty on October 22. 

Commander Robert E. Peary's 
proofs, records and observations that 
he reached the North Pole April 6, 
1909, have been submitted to the Na- 
tional Geographic Society. 

L. Gutierrez De Lara, whose extra- 
dition is sought by Mexico, has been 
released at Los Angeles, Cal., on $3000 
bail. De Lara is charged by the Fed- 
eral authorities as an anarchist. 

Figures received by the Nashville 
(Tenn.) Banner show that ninety- 
three persons were killed and one hun- 
dred injured in the recent cyclone in 
Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia. 

Philip Allen, Jr., vice-president of 
the First National Bank of Mineral 
Point, Wis., was arrested on October 
15 charged with the embezzlement of 
$168,000 of the bank's funds. 

Charles R. Crane, recently appointed 
Minister to China, was dismissed from 
that post by Secretary of State Knox, 
upon the ground of indiscretion in the 
public discussion of the relations be- 
tween the United States, China and 
Japan. 

Night riders have again commenced 
active operations in Kentucky, and 
burned the barn of Edward Johnson, 
near Willow, in Bracken county. 
Three thousand pounds of tobacco 
were destroyed. Johnson had not 
pooled his crop. 

As a result of a hurricane which 
struck the southern coast of Florida 
on October 11 Key West is a mass 
of wreckage and the damage to prop- 
erty is estimated at $2,000,000. Many 
lives were lost and a large number 
of vessels were wrecked. 

Governor Frear of Hawaii esti- 
mates the population of the Territory 
of Hawaii at 175,000. Of this total 
75,000 are Japanese, 18,000 Chinese, 
35,000 Hawaiians, and the 47,000 oth- 
ers of various nationalities, including 
whites, Spanish, Portuguese, etc. 

So great has been the demand for 
new Lincoln pennies that nothing else 
has been coined at the mint in Phila- 
delphia since the end of June. The 
coinage of the copper coins in the 
three and a half months has reached 
the total of 70,000,000 pennies. 

The New York Tribune, founded by 
Horace Greeley in 1841, announced on 
October 21 that two radical changes 
had been made — the price has been 
cut from 3 cents to 1 cent, while the 
familiar six-column makeup has been 
changed to seven columns. The Her- 
ald now remains the only 3-cent 
morning paper in New York. 

A committee of fifteen colored men, 
representing the colored citizens of 
Fairbanks, Alaska, presented former 
United States Senator Foraker with a 
gold medal at Cincinnati on October 
21 in recognition of his eflforts in be- 
half of the colored soldiers who were 
dismissed from the United States 
Army for alleged participation in the 
Brownsville (Texas) riot. 



San Francisco Letter LUt. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
montlis only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abhors, Arne 
Aga, Johan 
Akerson, Clias. A. 
Alander, O. J. 
Alver, A. M. 
Amundsen, Daniel 
Andersen, Chr. 
Andersen, -1562 
Andersen, Sam 
Andersen, Anton 
Andersen, -1108 
Andersen, -1514 
Andersen, -1048 
Andersen, -1560 
Anderson, -1048 

Hakke, Ed. 
Barrinto, J. 
Bastion. W. 
Beck, Mr. 
Beckman, Rudolph 
Beckwilh. Geo. 
Hensen. B. 
Berg, Julius 
Berentsen, -1755 
Berlinz, Emil 
Berntsson, M. 
Bevilacciue. O. 
Birde, Chr. 
Birkelund, R. 
Bjorklund, Erik 
Blindheim. O. C. 
Bliesath, Max 

Carlgren, -644 
Carlmark, Barthold 
Oarlscn, Sigurd 
Carlson, -735 
Carlson-760 
Carlson, Fred 
Orison, John 
Carlsson, John W. 
Carron, Ed. 
Chapman, Frank 
C'haler, B. 



Andersen, Sven 
Andersen, -1541 
Anderson, A. C. 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, John 
Andersson, Emil 
Andersson, Karl T. 
Andersson-1552 
Antonsen, Marius 
Arnold. E. B. 
Arntsen, Julian 
Aunbaun, A. 
Aylward, Jas. 

Blomqvist, Chas. 
Bohm, Emil 
Borresen, Niels 
Bourbigou, Louis 
Bower, G. 
Boyesson, John 
Brandt, Oscar 
Bray, John K. 
Bray, Edward 
Bregler, Fred 
Brelin, Adolph 
Brewer, Wm. 
Brinton, Geo. 
Browne, Harold W. 
Brox, Harry 
Buaas, Tliomas 
Bung, B. 

Chauche, J. A. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Carl E. 
Christensen, -587 
Christensen, -S50 
Christensen, -1125 
Christensen, Albert 
Christensen, M. H. 
Christensen-1332 
Claus, C. 
Cutler, Wm. 



[)ahl, John B. Dories, H. 

Ue Young, A. R. Dracar, Edgardo 

Diez, Th. H. Drausmann, Chas. 

Doose, Wm. Duncan, G. M. 



Edman, O. -557 
Eliassen, Sigurd 
Ellingsen, Fred 
Endresen, -673 
Engberg, Oscar 
Kngblom, Albert 
Eriksen, E. H. 
Ericksen, Gerhard 

Fallbom, J. A. 
Farnen, W. L. 
Faulkner, John E. 
Fogland. Arthur 
Fors, Alf. 

Gabrielsen, Elling 
Geiger, Joe 
Gibbs, Harry D. 
Gras, Chas. 
Green, W. 
Gronman, H. R. 

Haagensen, Martin 
Hallstrom, J. E. 
Malvorsen, Chas. 
Halvorsen, H. E. 
I lalvorsen, Wm. 
Hamilton, B. L. 
Hansen, -1134 
Hansen-1869 
Hansen, Emil 
Hansen, -1195 
Hansen, H. T. 
Hansen, Jens M. 
Hansen, Enok 
Hansen, Charles 
Hanson, N. 
Hansson, -1270 
Harmoning, Fritz 

Ingeman. -132 
Ingvalsen. Ing. 

Jacobsen, Hans H. 
Jacobsen, Martin 
Jacobsen, -1786 
Jansson, Andreas L 
Jensen, N. O. 
Jensen, Edw. K. 
Jensen, Ingwald M. 
Jensen, -769 
Jensen, -1791 
Jensen, -1944 
Jensen. -1076 
Jepson, A. 
Jenson, T. C 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen, Joakim 
Johansen, C H. 
Johansen-1191 
Johanson, A. F. 

Kaho. H. 
Kalman. L. 
Kane, G. 
Karlsen, Konrad 
Karlson. Aug. 
Karlson, Richard 
Karlsson, Gust. 
Karlgren-644 
Karthauser, Otto 
Kaufhold. Ed. 
Kavall, John 
Keelan, J. 
Kellgren, J. A. 
Kenniston, Frank 
Kerch, Geo. C. 
Kerr, Wm. 

Laason, -1790 
Laason, M. 
Lahr, Otto 
Laine, W. E. 
Lane, Leonard 
Lane, Leeland 
Langvardt, Chr. 
Larsen, Peter 



Erickson, K. 
Erikson, E. W. 
Eriksson, -333 
Erickson, A. 
Ericson, C. W. 
Erikson, P. E. 
Espensen, E. N. 

Frandsen, Niels 
Frankovich, A. 
Fredricksen, -529 
Frederiksen, B. 
Froberg, T. W. 

Culberson, A. 
Gunnarson. John 
Gunther, Chr. 
Gunderson, Ole 
Gustafsson, G. B. 

Hediund, Orvid 
Heesche, H. 
Hegener, Reinhold 
Heimann, Chr. 
Hendriksen, Adolf 
Henriksen, Adolf G. 
Hentschel, Otto 
Hodermann, Max 
Hogensen, M. 
Hoglund, Frank 
Holmgren. G. J. 
Hoist, Richard 
Holz-1764 

Huchlassen. Thomas 
Huisman, K. 
Hultberg-1833 
Hultman, Albln 

Isaacson, Hans 
Itvelt, P. 

Johanson, -880 
Johansson, Victor 
Johnsen, -1281 
,.Johnsen, Andreas 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Hilton C. 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, A. L. 
Johnson, -1509 
Johnson, Geo. 
Johnson, Hilmer 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, Fred 
Johnsson, Frank 
Jonassen, Johan 
Jorgensen, Johan 
Josephson, E. W. 

Klahn, Karl 
Klaes.son, Axel 
Klebingat, Fr. 
Klingstrom, G. 
Klingstrom. G. 
Kluge, Frank 
Knutsen, Halfdan 
Koft, M. 
Kolter. L. 
Kopats, Oscar 
Krautschard, F. 
Krestensen, C. E. 
Kristensen, -1088 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kristiansen, L. A. 
Kuehme, W. 

Lehto, Alex. 
Leino. G. F. 
Leibold, Fritz 
Leithoff, Carl 
Tjewald, Harry 
Lieberg, Gustaf 
Lindberg, John 
Lindholm-610 



Larsen, Ludv. J. 
Larson, L. 
Lass, -1406 
Lauretsen, Ole 

Madsen, -952 
Malmin, Tom 
Margnusson, E. W. 
Markmann, H. 
Martin. Geo. 
Mathiesen, L. 
Mattsson, K. J. 
Mattsson, Edw. 
Matthews. H. J. 
Mattler, Franz 
Mit'lelland, Thos. 
McKeown, Thos. 

Narepu, F. 
Naunian, Alf. 
Nelsen, B. P. 
Nolsen, -641 
Nelsen, Olaus 
Nelson, Martin 
Nelson. C. M. 
Nesbitt, J. 
Nester, Wilson C. 
Nielsen, -950 

O'Daly, John 
<-)iestad. Hans 
Olafsson. M. 
Olsen, Olai 
Olsen. Gust. 
Olsen, -47S 
Olsen. Paulus 
Olsen-996 

Pache, Paul 
Palizek. Lorenz 
Paulsen. Paul 
Pearson, J. T. 
Pedersen, S. Rein- 
hold 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pedersen, -1006 
Pedersen, -1136 
Pedersen, -1289 
Pedersen. Olav 
Pedersen, Oluf Chr. 
Pedersen, Pedar M. 
Pedersen, Olaf A. 
Pedersen, -1110 
Persson, Hjalmar 
Perssen, H. W. 
Peratis, W. 

Raahange, J. F. 
Kainlov, Emil 
Randle. Dave 
Rasmussen, A. R. 
Rasmusscn, Erik 
Rasmuson, A. 
Reese, W. H. C. 
Reichelt, H. A. 
Reutern, A.\el 
'Robinet, G. 

Saarin, J. 
Sampson, Carl 
Samsing, Carl 
Sandberg, N. A. 
Sandell. -2222 
Saul, T. A. 
Saunders. Chas. 
Scarabosio. M. 
Schevig. A. B. 
Schlosser. Ludv 
Schmidlen, John 
Schmidt. Fritz 
Schmitt. Geo. 
Schneckloth. Ed. 
Schulz, G. 
Schultz, Albert 
Schultze. Axel 
Schwartz, Jos. 
Schwencke. Karl 
Seiron, Tom 
Siebert, Harry 
Siem, C. 

Silfoerberg, Harold 
Siniens, Frank 
Simpson. L. C. 
Smith, Fred 
Smith, -648 
Smith. John V. 
Soderlund, A. 

Teigland, Karl 
Thomsen. Grouland 
Thomas, Jos. W. 
Thorne, Gus 
Thorsen-689 
Thorn. Arvld 
Till. Chas. 

Valeur. Marius 
Vega. F. A. 
Verdick. C. 
Vetland, John 

Wahi, J. 
Wakely, R. E. 
Wallrath, K. 
Watson, A. J. 
Wells, Geo. A. 
Welsen, J. 
Werner, Paul 
We.sthofer. H. 
Wetzel, Curt 
Weyer. Paul 
Weynian. Emil 
Wiberg, E. A. 

Zifter, Chas. 



Llndvlst, Carl A. 
Lindross. Oscar 
Lohne, E. 
Lundberg, John 

McKinley, Wm. 
Mehent, Joe 
Melart, Rolf 
Micholson, -1690 
Mikkelsen, Axel M. 
Mikkelsen, A. S. 
Miller, Jas. 
Moller, L. 
Monroe. Geo. E. 
Morken. Kristian 
Munze. Dick 



Nielsen, -909 
Nielsen, -1030 
Nielsen, -1014 
Nielsen, -918 
Nieml, Fr. 
Nilsen. C. J. 
Nilsson. Carl F. 
Nobereit, Gus 
Norvik, Morten 



Olsson. John Oscar 
Olsson, Alf. 
Olsson, J. W. 
Olsson. Karl 
Osol. Th. R. 
Osterdahl, Chaa. 
Ostlund, Edward 
Ounpaum, A. 

Peters, J. 
Petersen, S. 
Petersen, Oluf 
I'etersen, Richard 
Petersen, Chas. 
Petersen, -782 
Peterson, -1318 
Peterson, Johan 
Peterson. Henry 
Peterson. -1164 
Pettersen. O. T. 
Petterson, Oscar 
Petterson, Anton 
Pettersson, -709 
Pettersson. -1208 
I'ettersson, Sigurd 
Pratt. Mr. 
Purnhagen, Ludv. 

Rochov, Steven 
Rokov, Stefltan 
Rommel, Andrew 
Rosenvald. Isak 
Rost, K. G. 
Roussel, Fernand 
Rustanius, -925 
Ruthberg, E. 
Ryits, A. 
Ryberg, S. 

Soland, Hans 
Solberg, T. 
Sonnenberg, Herman 
Sorensen, -1492 
Sorensen. -1664 
Southerland, A. 
Sovik, H. 
Sprague, C. B. 
Stangeland, P. E. 
Steen, Helmar 
Stein, John 
Strand, Olav 
Strandquist. Louis 
Sundberg. K. K. 
Sutierez. Arthur 
Svanson. Hugo 
Svendsen, -1050 
Svend.sen. A. F. S. 
Svendsen. Anker 
Svendsen, Otto A. 
Svendsen. Otto 
Swanson, Carl 
Swanson, Hugo 
Swanson, -1932 
Swansson, Emil 
Swensson, Martin 
Swensson. L. G. 
S.vvertsen. Hans 



Tiller. E. 
Todal, Maartin 
Tofte, H. 
Tollefsen, Aug. 
Torkelsen. Marinus 
Trenton. Louis 
Turan, R. 

Vickers, John 
Viereck. Henry 
Vogel, Alartin 
Vortman, Wm. 

Wickstrom, Chas. 
Wideberg, Oscar 
Wiekman, P. 

Wilitol, Ernest 
Wikstrom. Wm. 
Wilke, Wm. 
Wilson. Fred 
Wingsten, Hj. 
Winsens. P. G. 
Winters, Ch. 
Wolter, John 
Wun.sdorf, Aug. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, Eskll 
Andersson, J. S. 
Berntsen, Julius 
Cox, H. B. 
Farm, J. B. 
Fostwedt. Carl 
Hultberg. Ernst 
Jensen, M. 
Jacobsen, Hans 
Johnson, C. A. 
Kearns, Edwin 
KJorsvik, Johan 
Kent, Jack 



Klebingat, Fred 
Lorin, Crlstian 
Lynd, Chas. 
Moren, E. H. 
Olson, Olaf 
Olson, Otto 
Scott, Ed. 
Sundholm, Freppa 
Schmidt, Franz 
Schneider, William 

I. 
Sanchez, Frank 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson. A. B. Jacobsen. Olai 

Anderson, Chas. -907Johanson. Emil 

Behrent, E. -1579 Larsen, Holger 



Berndt, Hugo 
Buhmeister. John 
Chapman, P. 
Charlson, M. 



Lund. Peter 
McGuire, George 
Meyers, Chas. 
Nilsen. Oscar L. 



Christoffersen, Emil Nordenberg, John 



Clausen, Nils 
Davey, Chas. 
Ekblom, Alfred 
Eklund. Sven W 
Eliasen. E. -396 
Franzell, A. 



Olsen, Ole Johan 
Olsen, Sigvald 
Poppe, George 
Ratshet, August 
Saunders, J. 
Sovig. Chas. 



Frederickson, F. H. Swanson, Ben 



529 

Hansen, Pete 
Harris, J. 



Turner, Alfred 
Turner, Richard 
Wells, Leo L. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Ahrens, W. 
Anderson, B. 
Alexander, K. 
Arnold, E. B. 
Anderson, P. T. 
Anderson, Harry 
Andersson, J. R. 
Anderson, -1534 
Abhors, A. 
Anderson, Sven 
Appelgreen, J. 
Buchtman, F. 
Billington, M. 
Birkelund, R. 
P.usse. Ch. 
Brandt, N. 
Benson, Jon. 
Boosban, Ch. 
Carlson, K. J. 
Christensen, H. 
Christensen. C. E. 
Duval, Benolt 
Dories, H. 
Do we, J. 
Domhoflf, J. 
Drager, Otto 
Elchel, Ch. 
Eliassen. H. -599 
Eliassen. G. -1427 
Focketyn, F. 
Furman, F. 
Frank, F. -499 
Goepper. Ch. 
Godley. Geo. 
Hansen, H. M. 
Haniger, A. J. 
Hammond, J. A. 
Hammerquist, A. J. 



Hope, Ole 
Jacobsen. -1786 
Johansson. 1700 
Johannesson, J. 
Jacobsen, Eriand 
Jensen. L. 
Jalonen, J. 
Johannesen, Carsten 
Kristiansen. L. 
Kavander, W. 
Kosklnen, W. 
Long, L. 
Lerch, Paul 
Lewis. G. H. 
Lundgreen. C. 
Matsson, Karl 
Morris, Oscar 
Mulley. James 
Malbom, H. 
Metge, G. 
Morden, J. 
MIchalsen, J. 
Nielsen, V. -1000 
Oien, Thom. 
Orten, S. 
Pierson, A. 
Pederson, -896 
Petersen. C. 
Pedersen, James 
Rantanen, -770 
Rustanious, J. 
Quistgard, C. 
Swales. A. E. 
Swansen, Carl 
Syversen, H. 
Tuvfeson, Knut 
Taddiken, A. 
Vongher, Ed. 



Pt. Townsend Letter LUt. 



Anderson, Sven 
Behrens, E. -1549 
Boyle, John 
Chapman, F. S. 
Hillig. Albert 
Holtberg. John C. 
Johansen, - 2021 
Knucken, T. 
Klebingal, Fred 



Lundgren, Carl 
McCallum, Charles 
Nagel, Arthur 
Peterson, Paul 
Rosenfeld. L. 
Stabell, Frank 
Sundqulst, Carl 
Walser, Ernest 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' 
of the Pacific. 



Union 



Andersson, Vlcktor 
Cornelius. L. 
Dahlman. Axel 
Hansen, Chas. 
Holmstrom, Carl A. 
Jensen, -1944 
'nhnson, Chaa. 
Johnson, Ed v. -1980 



Johannessen. -1863 
Kolstad. Anton 
Morken, Kristian 
Kuhlmann. Louis 
Ruthberg, E. 
Torkildsen. Marius 
Wilberg. John 
Zimmi-rman. F. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S LETTER LIST. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Letters at the Alaska Fishermen's of- 
fice will be advertised for six months 
only and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of seven months 
from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify the 
Secretary of the Alaska Fishermen's 
Union of their present address, in order 
to have their mail forwarded them. 



Andreasen. Mogens 
Andersen, August 
Andrrson, Axel 
Arntsen, Albert 
Benson, John 
Bowman, Bernard 
Farrell, Henry D. . 
Gulliksen, Gustav 
Green. John 
llageli. F. 
Hagen, G. L. 
Hansen, Harry 
Hammerin, P. B. 
Jensen. Chs. 
Johnson, George P. 



Johannesen, August 
Kerr, Wm. 
Mullen, James E. 
Nielsen, Carl Johan 
Nicolarsen. Otto 
Nilsson, Carl 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olson, Ole 
Olsen, Olaf 
Pettersen, Isaac 
Prescott, Fred 
Rllse, Wm. 
Swanson, Chas. 
Thompson, A. 
Tonnessen, Jorgen 



Eureka, CaL, Letter LUt. 



Anderson, H. A. 

-1449 
Anderson, Olof 
Anderson, S. 
Armml, Walter 
Bartels, C. H. 
Beary, Charles 
Bentsen, Bent 
Blunt, H. 
Bostrom, C. 



Lambar, Ermlnlo 
Lorensen, Orgt. C. 
Michell, Agojtlno 
Mittemeijcr. J. P. 
Newman, J. S. 
Niccolal, Sant 
Nilsen, Ruder 3. 
Nylund, Sven 
Olson, Bror 
Oman. Vlcktor 



Brander. Frank -144301sen. C. 
Christensen, H. C. Oterdahl. Charles 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Johan Pommer, a native of Russia, 
aged about 38, supposed to be some- 
where in a Pacific Coast State, is in- 
quired for by Alex Pommer, Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, 44-45 East street, 
San Francisco. 



Clemensen, C. H. 

Conaughton. H. 

Ediund. Gust 

Geiger. Joseph 

Grant, John 

Gunther. Theo. 

Gustafson, Edvart Svensen. Olof 

Halvorsen. Ingval Stabell. Frank 

Hollins. Frank 

Isaacson. Gustav 

Johnsen. J. 

Karlsson,, A. H. 



Pateejanski, R. 
Pedersen. P. G. 
Penny. Matt. 
Salmlnen. K. W. 
Shulls, Christ 
Sjellman. Jonas 



Teigland, G. 
Thoresen, G. 
Thoresen. Petter 
Walbrefh. Carl 



Kittelsen. Chrltlan Wickstrom. Charles 
Knudsen, Jacob E. Yannl. C. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

(The German Bank) 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 

of San Francisco.) 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cai. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000.000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,504,498.68 

Deposits, June 30, 1909 36,793,234.04 

Total Assets 39,435,681.384 

Eemittance may be made by draft, postotflce 
or Wells, Fargo i: Co.'s money orders, or coin by 
express. 

Office hours — 10 o'clock a.m. to 3 o'clock p.m., 
except Saturdays to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday 
evenings from 7 o'clock p.m. to 8 o'clock p.m. 
for receipt of deposits only. 
OrSoers. 

President. N. Oblandt; first vice president, 
Daniel Meyer; second vice president, Emil Uolite; 
easbier. A. H. R. Schmidt; assistant casbicr. 
William Herrmann: secretary. George Tourny; 
assistant secretary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow 
& Eells, general attorneys. 

Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt. Daniel Mever. Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhardt. I. N. Walter. J. W. Van Bergen, 
F. Tillmann Jr., B. T. Kruse and W. S. Good- 
fellow. 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission street, between 
Twenty-first and 'Twenty-spcond street:;. I''or re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 

C. W. Heyer, Manager. 
Richmond District Branch, 432 Clement 
Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. 
For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 
Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 
400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
^2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGRBN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 



THE ADMIRAL 

146 EAST STREET 
100 large, nicely furnished rooms from 
35c to $2 per day, $2 to $5 per week. 

Electric Light and Call Bells, Hot and 
Cold "Water, and Clean, Sanitary Bedding 
in Every Room. Electric Elevator Ser- 
vice. Free Baths. 

FERRY HOUSE 

CORNER EAST AND MISSION STS. 

Opposite Ferry Building 
EARTHQUAKE AND FIREPROOF 
The only house in the block between 
Market and Mission streets which was not 
injured by the great catastrophe of 1906. 
Nice Sunny Furnished Rooms from 25c 
to $2 per day; $1.50 to $6 per week; rooms 
for two persons $2.50 per week. 



BANNERS, REGALIA, ETC. 

Gold Bullion, Silk Embroidered and 
Painted Silk and Satin Banners; Hand 
Embroidered Silk American and Spe- 
cial Flags; Reversible and Ribbon 
Parade Badges; Silk and Satin Sashes 
and Regalia. All Union Made and 
Manufactured by 

THE WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 

860 Mission St. Phone Kearny 1966 

Patronize Home Industry. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

109STEUARTST., SanFrancisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



BfiST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTUREiiS 

133 HARTFORD ST., S. F. 



S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CAUFORNIA 

MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 

Branches: 624 Van Ness Avenue and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letters of Credit issued, payable in all parts of the world. 
Chas. F. Leege, Pres. W. A. Frederick, Vice-Pres. B. G. Tognazzi, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vice-Pres. 



SOMETHING NEWT 

THe Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

" ANTIDOTE, " 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
t a n t Advantages 
which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking in. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first few smokes in 
an ordinary Pipe, 
the First Smoke in 
a n "ANTIDOTE" 
is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. T ii e 
Catalytic lining 
protects the briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" is always 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Cataiyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing it to pass oft into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

KASSE:R BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET, S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




Best Suits in Town 

for the money 

at 

Capt.C.J.Swanson 

Up-to-date Clothier 
and Gents' Furnisher 

OilsKins, Gold Seal 

Rubberboots 

Uniforms, Hats and 

Shoes 

Pants a Specialty 

The main essential to working 
pants are good material and good 
workmanship. Then, as it costs no 
more, they may as well be properly 
cut. You get all these in "Stag" 
Union-made Trousers, guaranteed 
not to rip. Good for all purposes, 
priced $1 up to $7. 

119 EAST STREET 

Phone Douglas 1082 

San Francisco 




^-^^ « >»^^~X f^^"W~^'W~^ ^7» See that this label (in light blue) 
^^ j^^l B^ 3 I^L. t^ l^^^^^appears on the box in which 



you are served. 



^^^S^^^^^^^^^^^^sinmom^Q 




U&ued by AuUiOfilyof tne Cigar MaKers' International Unionof America 

Union-made Cigars. 

UhiS €fllifif;J That the a^ut conuined Inthls box havd b«(i mala bya MlSt-ClJSS mUMiai 
aM[«l£ROFlH[ClGAI(MAKfRJ'INI[JlllATION*lu»IONij( Amtiu, tnomiizitmieyaMbiilviii- 
MnctmmlortheMORAl,MAT[Rl«an(llllI[lu;cmAIW[llARi;OfTM[CRArT. "" ' ' 



Ihcfvlore we rflconunend 



theM Cigjrs to all smolders lAroughout the worlij 
All Inlringemtnts upon this label wdfbe punished according to taW 



F«C 
' SIMILE 



^ ?!C (^ASiiU>. PresieUnt, 
V C-ffUo) 



^f America. 




Sydney (Australia) employers are 
appealing against a recent award of 
the Clothing and Tailoring Wages 
Board. 

The Executive Council of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor has issued 
an appeal for financial assistance to 
the Swedish strikers. 

The Australian Federal Government 
is making preliminary investigations 
in connection with a proposed unem- 
ployment insurance scheme. 

The Employers' Federation in Syd- 
ney, Australia, has taken legal advice 
respecting the issue of the badge by 
the Shop Assistants' Union. 

Six hundred coal miners at Helens- 
burgh, New South Wales, are idle in 
consequence of a dispute in connection 
with cavilling for places. 

The dispute in the Victorian print- 
ing trade has been satisfactorily set- 
tled at a conference, the employes ob- 
taining a large all-round 'ncrease of 
wages. 

The directors of the Melbourne 
(Australia) Tramway Company have 
issued a Czar-like ukase forbidding 
the formation of a union amongst the 
employes under penalty of losing 
steady employment, etc. 

One hundred delegates bolted the 
recent convention of the Ohio State 
Federation of Labor owing to the 
adoption by that body of a report 
seating the delegates from a seceding 
local of the Electrical Workers. 

The five shearers' unions in New 
Zealand have adopted the rules of the 
Australasian Workers' Union, and 
amalgamated under the name of "The 
New Zealand Shearers and Other Pas- 
toral Employes' Industrial Union of 
Workers." 

Resolutions denouncing the "mur- 
der" of Francisco Ferrer, the Spanish 
revolutionist, who was condemned by 
court-martial and shot in Barcelona, 
were adopted at the session of the 
Executive Council of the American 
Federation of Labor held at Wash- 
ington, D. C, on October 19. 

The United Textile Workers of 
America met in annual convention at 
Washington, D. C, on October 19. 
There were present about forty dele- 
gates, representing 10,000 organized 
workers. The convention was ad- 
dressed by President Gompers, of the 
American Federation of Labor. 

Peonage that is believed to exist in 
and about Chicago, as well as in other 
parts of the United States, was the 
subject of investigation at Chicago on 
October 20 at the meeting of the 
peonage committee of the special im- 
migration commission appointed by 
Congress at the suggestion of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt. 

The steamer Siberia, which arrived 
at Honolulu on October 22, brought 
forty-eight Russian families, composed 
of 214 members, to relieve the scarcity 
of the sugar plantation laborers which 
has existed on the Islands since the 
Japanese employes of the planters 
went on strike several months ago. 
The immigrants came from Man- 
churia. 

What promised to be a serious 
strike on the Salt Lake division of the 
Southern Pacific has been narrowly 
averted as the result of a recent con- 
ference between employes and offi- 
cials. It is reported that the com- 
pany has agreed upon a four-cent-per- 
hour increase as a compromise to the 
six-cent increase said to have been de- 
manded by the machinists. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



"We all make blunders. I thought 
once I was a square peg when I was 
really a round one.'' 

"How did you find out your mis- 
take?" 

"I got into a hole!" 



"Why don't you deal with me?" in- 
quired the new grocer. 

"Didn't know you were in busi- 
ness;," explained the old editor, and 
the next day his paper had another 
big display ad.— Pittsburg Post. 

"How much do I owe you?" growled 
the man as he arose from the barber 
chair. 

"Only a quarter for the shave, sir," 
replied the tonsorial artist. "I won't 
charge you anything for plastering up 
the place I cut you." 

Officious Offspring— Pa, may I ask 
just one more question? 

Patient Peter — Yes, my son. Just 
one more. 

Officious Offspring— Well, then, pa, 
how is it that the night falls, but it's 
the day that breaks? 

Affable Passenger— Indeed and you 
are a music hall artist! I am a bank- 
er, and 1 think it must be at least 
twenty years since I was in a music 
hall. 

Music Hall Artist (regretfully) — 
And I'm quite certain, sir, it's twenty 
years since I was in a bank. 

"There is one thing I like about 
classical concerts," remarked the gen- 
tle cynic. 

"What's that?" queried the dense 
party. 

"One never hears the tunes whis- 
tled on the streets the next day," an- 
swered the other. 



"No," drawled the mayor of the far 
Western settlement, "the boys had 
some money tied up in that thar bank- 
rupt telephone company, an' they just 
didn't like the way the receiver was 
handling the business." 

"Didn't, eh?" commented the tour- 
ist. "Well, what did they do about 
it?". 

"Oh, they just hung up the receiv- 
er." 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, tor instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for, or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 IVIARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 



THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 

DEPOSITARY OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Capital and Surplus $600,000. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

LEWIS I. COWGIUL. President HENRY WILSON 

FREDERICK F. SAYRK, Vice-President ALBERT SUTTON 

L. M. MatDONALl), Cashier JACOB JENSEN 

J. C. ESCHEN W. H. LITTLE 

Money tran.sni]lted to all parts of the world at lowest rate.s. 



I SAN TRANCISCO STORE 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Qub 

E. r. COI^I^INS. M»natf«r 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



D. EDNVARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQU.A.RTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

50 EAST ST., and 4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 




UENT U. S. GOVERNMENT CHtRTS AND NAUTIML niBllUTIONS 
KrOOGRAPHIC AND CEODETIC 



H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MAR.KET STR.E.ET 

Gore ol Sacramentu and Market Sts., SAN FIANCISCO. CAl. 

DCALCR IN 

Watches, Chronometers, Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods, Diamonds 



MARINE ca, FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observation 
Chronometcr* and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN S. CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. 
Boss of the Road Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 
Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS. SHOES AND CLOTHING 



rw 



w 



A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 

> Isuid tgaeHutliiiilj ol tin 

l^inraiiwnoiuu. | UIVioiN 





'^ommmCa 



ill Witck Be;ilrli( 
Wututad tot 9 7»n 



IRELIABLEt. 



Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 



Telephone Kearny 20i1 



715 MARKET STREET neit to Call Building 

Branch Store 2593 Mission Street neaf 22nd 

San Francisco, Cal. 

! ^ Largest and Finest Assortment in Diamonds 

' 'Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Silverware. Cut Glass, Opera 
Clas ses. U mbrellas and Silver Novelties. ^^^ 

^^ Eyes Eianined Free b) Eipert Opticians ^^ 

J2K. 1«K. & UK. Solid Gold Wcddlol Rlngj Sold by Welihl 



Men's 

Shirts 

$1 



They are made in the eas.v-to-get- 
into coat style with cuffs attached. 
Tlicv are mostly of iiorcale, a. few 
madras scattered in; they have plain 
or plaited fronts. In delicate self- 
colorod stripes, broad double stripes, 
and with stripes with dainty figures 
between; also in figures alone; also 
some in the solid colors, as well as 
many in the darker shades. Cut full 
for comfortable wear, and strongly 
scweii. especially in the places where 
tile strain is greatest. Ordinarily we 
would ask much more, but this is an 
unusually good lot picked up at ran- 
dom at a low price. 

YOU CAN GET THEM NOW. 



^li 



979 to 987 Market 
25 to 33 Sixth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



PAGE 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Now located at 

82 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Franclic* 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furni.sliing Goods, Hals, Caps. Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc., Moots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothlnx. Seamen's Outflti 
a specialty. 

II you want first-class goods at tha 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — ^Look for the Nam* 
and Number. 



UNITED STATES NAUTICAL COLLEGE 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. C. S., Principal 

This Modern Navigation School has no superior In the world to-day. 
As a practical navigator the Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right experience and ability to teach you up-to-date 
methods in a systematic and easy manner. You can find one or more of our pupils 
OTi most any vessel sailing out of this port. ASK THEM. 

Advice on Maritime Law, Ship's Business and Naturalization FREE. 
Evenings By Appointment. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 
320 MARKET ST., S. F. Visitors Welcome. Telephone Kearny 4686 



Don't forget Charles Johnson's 

DEFENDER CIGAR STORE 

22 East St., San Francisco. 

My aim is to please everybody with 

good goods, fair prices and 

courteous treatment. 

Agent for Sheerin's Laundry. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
Political Printing a Specialty 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

4 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 
1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 
2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 



When making purchases from out 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, (or Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Oiganization. 




VOL. XXIII, No. 7. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3. 1909. 


Whole No. 2041. 



COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERIES. 



THE DESTRUCTION of the Columbia 
River fisheries by fishwheels and the defeat 
of the legislation enacted by direct vote of 
the people of Oregon are fully described by Ed. 
Rosenberg, Secretary-Treasurer of the United 
Fishermen of the Pacific, in a communication to 
the Labor Press, of Portland, Or. We reprint 
Comrade Rosenberg's communication in full, as 
follows: 

In the Columbia River fisheries over $4,001),- 
000 of capital is invested. Over 7,000 workers 
find employment in this industry during part of 
the year. The value of the catch of 1908 was 
$1,200,000. A case of chinook salmon, containing 
48 one-pound cans, now sells from $5 to $6.60 
per case, according to grade of fish. 

In 1884, when the fish traps, seines and wheels 
had as yet not to any extent caused the great 
destruction of our salmon, when fishing was 
mainly carried on by gillnets, the pack reached 
its highest figure, 656,000 cases. At $5 per case 
this would give $3,280,000. At $6.60 per case, it 
would make $4,329,600. 

Through the destruction caused on the Colum- 
bia by fish traps, seines, and especially through 
fishing with wheels in the narrows of the Upper 
Columbia, our salmon last year, as stated, 
brought us only $1,200,000. 

This year, the pack being 30 per cent less than 
last year, it will give us only $840,000. With the 
fishwheels and the seines in the narrows of the 
Upper Columbia improving their methods year 
by year, the decline will become more rapid each 
year. The fishwheels almost absolutely prevent 
the depositing of salmon spawn in over two- 
thirds of the best spawning grounds of the Col- 
umbia. This compels the various fishing gear to 
more and more exhaust the returns from the re- 
maining one-third of our natural spawning 
grounds. 

As to our salmon industry we are somewhat 
now in the same position as the man who, in- 
heriting a farm of ISO acres, all splendidly cul- 
tivated, only seeds year after year 50 acres, leav- 
ing 100 acres to go to waste. The consequence 
is that the yield is not only two-thirds less, but 
the tendency is to overwork the 50 cultivated 
acres, in an efTort to get the largest possible 
crop. 

I say somewhat, because a neglected farm, after 
a few years of careful tilling, might again become 
as productive as ever. But as our salmon only 
come every four years into our rivers to spawn, 
the young returning to and remaining in the ocean 
four years to mature, once the salmon are ex- 
hausted, by being prevented to reach their spawn- 
ing grounds, it will take the most careful pro- 
tection and great expense for from 30 to 50 
years to again restock the river, with many 
chances of failure even then. 

And what is destroying this great food prod- 
uct of our State? The answer is, shortsighted 
greed, backed by political corruption. 

The salmon spawn above head of tide, that is, 
in those parts of the Columbia and its tributaries 
where the ocean tides do not any more affect the 
rise and fall of the river, where the water always 
flows in one direction and gravel bars enable the 
salmon to so deposit their spawn, that while the 



spawn is protected frcmi other predatory I'ishes. it 
has sufficient air to hatch out and the salmon fry 
have the protection of gravel and rocks against 
their enemies. 

In the Columbia, al)0\-c head uf tide, lislnvlieels 
have been erected and seines are operated. In 
the narrows of the Upper Columbia and at the 
falls, these wheels under ordinary water condi- 
tions form an almost absolute barrier against 
the salmon endeavoring to reach the spawning 
grounds. 

For over twenty years the Legislature of Ore- 
gon has been urged by friends of salmon pro- 
tection to prohibit commercial salmon lishing 
above head of tide in the Columbia. This pro- 
tection is applied to other salmon streams of the 
Pacific Coast. But a number of the fishwheel 
owners, having become millionaires through this 
wasteful system of fishing, resisted this reform. 
The majority of the legislators always proved 
pliant tools in the hands of these few wealthy 
men. 

Hence in 1908 the Initiative was invoked as the 
only possible method to save our salmon. Lead- 
ing citizens from all over the State readily gave 
the prestige of their names, gave their time for 
this purpose. The State Federation of Labor and 
the State Grange unanimously indorsed the bill 
to stop salmon fishing in the Columbia at head of 
tide. The people at the polls in June gave a ma- 
jority of 26,000 votes, out of 86,000 votes cast; 
that is, gave a larger majority for this bill than 
for any of the other measures voted upon, ex- 
cepting the bill confirming the principle of Direct 
Legislation. 

Surely, everyone would have said, the people 
and salmon protection have won. 

But not so, for the fishwheel owners, fully 
realizing that in a fair fight in the open they 
were hopelessly beaten, presented at the same 
election to the vote of the people a trick bill 
which, under the guise of salmon protection, 
practically abolished salmon fishing in the wide 
lower river and gave the salmon-fishing over to 
the few millionaire fishwheel owners. This lat- 
ter bill, through misrepresentation, trickery and 
fraud, secured a majority of 6,000. 

As the Initiative law provides that where two 
bills dealing with the same matter are in con- 
flict, the bill receiving the highest vote shall 
become law, the friends of salmon protection 
took steps to bring these two bills before the 
State courts, the proper tribunal in such cases. 
However, predatory wealth is not easily deprived 
of its prey. The Board of Fish Commissioners 
was induced to come to its aid. Under the proper 
beating of the drums of our cajjitalistic press, 
always ready to succor our robber barons, tlie 
master fish warden of Oregon made spectacular 
arrests of Washington wheelmen and trapmen. 
Duly the Governors of the two States involved 
met, disagreed, talked about calling out the 
militia to protect their respective fishermen. 
Then duly the Washington wheelmen brought 
the matter to the Federal court at Portland. 
That court issued an injunction, not only for- 
bidding the enforcement of these two Initiative 
laws in strictly Washington waters, but also in 
Oregon waters. The Attorney-Gener.'.l of Oregon 
pled for suspension of the two laws in Oregon 
waters. That is, the attorney for Oregon pled 
with the I'-cderal court that the rights of his 



clients, that of the voters of Oregon, to have 
their own laws tried in their own courts, be taken 
away from them. 

This concluded the first act in this drama, 
which can be entitled "Initiative and Referendum 
Betrayed by Its Guardians." 

Fortunately, some time prior to this the friends 
of salmon protection, the friends of the right of 
the people to enact laws for their benefit, had 
induced the Attorney-Generals of the States of 
Oregon and Washington to carry the Chris Nel- 
son case to the Supreme Court of the United 
States, which, by deciding disputes over fishery 
jurisdiction on the Columbia raised by the two 
States for tlie last twenty years, would prevent 
the interference of the lower Federal courts in 
such a dispute as that caused by the enactment 
of the two Initiative fishery bills. 

Through the aid of the two senior Senators 
of Washington and Oregon, who appeared in 
November, 1908, before the United States Su- 
preme Court and urged a speedy trial, this case 
was advanced on the calendar and a decision, 
favorable to true salmon protection, was rendered 
by that court on March 1, 1909. 

Here again, however, in the second act of this 
drama, the Legislature of Oregon betrayed the 
people by repealing, on February 19, 1909, the 
two Initiative fishery bills — that is, by the narrow- 
margin of ten days the wheelmen got ahead of 
the people. For when the Federal court at Port- 
land granted the injunction suspending the oper- 
ation of the two Initiative fishery bills, it was 
understood the decision of the United States Su- 
preme Court in the Chris Nelson case would 
annul or modify it, so lliat the State courts could 
act. 

Not only did the Oregon Legislature repeal 
the two Initiative fishery bills, but it took thirty 
days in the spring from the fishing season and 
enacted a weekly closing law from Saturday night 
to Sunday night. As the wheels are so con- 
structed that practically no salmon can pass their 
sixty miles of territory in the Upper Columbia, 
such closed seasons simply meant that tne salmon 
were protected in the lower river, to be given 
to the niillionaire fishwheel owners of the Upjjcr 
Columbia. 

The results of the present fishing season on 
the Columbia fully proves the latter contention. 
While the pack in the Lo